Less is More? Watch

exppex
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#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
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The statement "less is more" perplexes me. Logically, as long as you are recovering enough to make progress in workload then the more volume you do the more potential for growth and strength increases? However, real training experience does not seem to always follow this thinking.

How does your training experience credit or discredit the "less is more?" idea?
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by exppex)
Logically, as long as you are recovering enough to make progress in workload then the more volume you do the more potential for growth and strength increases?
If that was true marathon runners, for example, would be some of the most muscular and strongest people in the world.

There are a whole range of factors which influence muscle and strength development. Yes volume and recovery ability are two but there are many more which are of equal or greater importance such as the type of stimulus you apply to your muscles, diet, rest, etc.
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exppex
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Report Thread starter 9 years ago
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(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
If that was true marathon runners, for example, would be some of the most muscular and strongest people in the world.

There are a whole range of factors which influence muscle and strength development. Yes volume and recovery ability are two but there are many more which are of equal or greater importance such as the type of stimulus you apply to your muscles, diet, rest, etc.
But surely the more specific stimulus applied to your muscles is ALWAYS better than less stimulus provided you are able to recover for the next session or program overall progression over a time period. The method being used to increase the stimulus being irrelevant. The method invariably is specific to the goal and results expected from training.

I just don't see how the suggestion that to do less than you are capable of on purpose could logically be seen as a good idea, as you are reducing the applied stimulus, giving less adaptation as a result. The only possible reason I can see are factors that contribute to recovery(such as diet and rest). Otherwise, surely you should continue to do as much as possible, bordering on overtraining, but avoiding passing the actual threshold by controlling your programming. This way you should get a powerful stimulus, leading to a powerful adaptation to that stimulus, which can then be used to perform a stronger stimulus without the regression in performance caused by systemic overtraining.
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Rucklo
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Report 9 years ago
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(Original post by exppex)
I just don't see how the suggestion that to do less than you are capable of on purpose could logically be seen as a good idea, as you are reducing the applied stimulus, giving less adaptation as a result. The only possible reason I can see are factors that contribute to recovery(such as diet and rest). Otherwise, surely you should continue to do as much as possible, bordering on overtraining, but avoiding passing the actual threshold by controlling your programming. This way you should get a powerful stimulus, leading to a powerful adaptation to that stimulus, which can then be used to perform a stronger stimulus without the regression in performance caused by systemic overtraining.
I presume you mean such things as 5X5 Programs?

1) Generally people on them are beginners. You don't want them causing injuries or getting massivly sore to begin with.
2) By doing less reps it's easier to increase strength. Only doing 5 reps mean's you can add more weight on easier. I was a bit of a noob when i started and i did 8-10 reps from my first session. And i could generally up the weight, but only for 5-6 reps. So i never actually increased it much since i thought it was failing. When i want on a strength routine it started going up well.
3) Real life. I do not want to walk around college like I have been raped in the ass after squatting 90kg for as many as I possibly can do. Sure if your are a pro or madly dedicated then yeah go for it but I train to be stronger and healther in real life. And me not being able to walk properly for 3 out of 7 wouldn't be what I was training for.
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