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Binge drinking in students watch

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    Hello all,

    I am a postgrad student at Paisley University, doing my PhD in binge drinking (Yes I have heard all the jokes ). Part of what I am interested in is looking at the difference between the stereotypical image of binge drinkers and what really goes on.

    As part of this I am conducting an online survey at...

    http://freeonlinesurveys.com/rendersurvey.asp?id=91605

    ...which takes about 5 minutes to complete and is completely confidential. I am also interested in what people think about binge drinking in general though so if anyone has any comments they would like to post please do so
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    I think binge drinking is partly a result of moral decline due to Thatchers destruction of industry (therefore whole communities)

    It's also due to more middle class kids growing up in an age of more independence where many have jobs where the money is used for leisure only almost.

    Every time I go out to town I binge drink. I don't fall on the floor and be sick, but I binge drink.
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    It's also due to more middle class kids growing up in an age of more independence where many have jobs where the money is used for leisure only almost.
    The reason why they binge more is that the government has taken a dim view of boarding schools having their own bars, thus many dont have them on more. The result is that they dont know how to drink in moderation, previously we were taught this.
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    The advent of binge drinking coincided with the availability of alcho-pops.

    The taste of alcho-pops, being fruit based makes them more palatable than say a dry white wine, lager, vodka and tonic - several can be drunk within the space of one hour, the alchol content is high, the taste inoccuous and the result deadly!
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    Most middle class kids don't go to boarding schools though I wouldn't have thought.
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    (Original post by Northumbrian)
    Most middle class kids don't go to boarding schools though I wouldn't have thought.
    Id class myself middle class and i went to one. Middle class is a broad definition includuing barristers, doctors, etc and many of these people send their children to boarding school. What is middle class than? Its not only upper classes who go.
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    Whatever you class it as, most don't go to boarding schools.
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    (Original post by Northumbrian)
    I think binge drinking is partly a result of moral decline due to Thatchers destruction of industry (therefore whole communities)
    If binge drinking is a result of Thatcher, how does this explain binge drinking around the rest of the world?
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    (Original post by Ferret_messiah)
    If binge drinking is a result of Thatcher, how does this explain binge drinking around the rest of the world?
    Wow she must be one influential evil lady.
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    (Original post by Ferret_messiah)
    If binge drinking is a result of Thatcher, how does this explain binge drinking around the rest of the world?
    binge drinking (rise there of) is due to drinks these days being much more palettable and the industry getting better at masking the alcoholic taste.

    Its much harder for instance to binge on ale or beer than it is alcopops, vodka red bull etc etc
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    how does this explain binge drinking around the rest of the world?
    Where is binge drinking a problem like it is here? Nowhere I have been. Unless it was me and my british friends doing it in foreign countries!

    Also, alcohol is cheaper than it used to be and much cheaper than in non-touristy europe. I was in Rouen last autumn and a pint of cider cost me 4 quid. This is in a town where it is the regional produce! And to get into a club for a boy cost 20 euros!
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    i'll answer this next week...not drinking during exams but will be back to normal as soon as they finish (literally)
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    I think the demonstration of contempt for boarding school bars is a demonstration of the government's complete lack of thought on the matter.

    Teenagers, including underagers, will drink. I started when I was 15, I passed my exams, I've never been in trouble with Her Majesty's finest, I've never destroyed anything and I haven't fought anyone under the influence. That said, some nights I want to go out to a pub or club and get trashed - c'est la vie.

    What we should do is normalise alcohol consumption. Within the middle classes, drinking wine with dinner etc from an early age is common. It doesn't seem to be so in working class Britain. Guess which group causes trouble as a result...

    We need to end punitive taxation on alcohol. It should get the standard 17.5% VAT, that is enough, and we should accept the realities of life and lower the age for purchasing alcohol to 16 or 17.

    It's not alcohol that the problem, it's a few little neds ruining it for the rest of us. Hell, I can't even have a happy hour in my local - that's the state interfering where it has no right to.
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    (Original post by Northumbrian)
    Where is binge drinking a problem like it is here? Nowhere I have been. Unless it was me and my british friends doing it in foreign countries!

    Also, alcohol is cheaper than it used to be and much cheaper than in non-touristy europe. I was in Rouen last autumn and a pint of cider cost me 4 quid. This is in a town where it is the regional produce! And to get into a club for a boy cost 20 euros!
    America? Russia? Both have fairly high binge drinking. Unfortunately I'm not in the habit of stockpiling old magazines, or I could quote a New Scientist article on the alcohol industry from last year, which mentioned that in Russia binge drinking is about the only vareity of drinking.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    The advent of binge drinking coincided with the availability of alcho-pops.

    The taste of alcho-pops, being fruit based makes them more palatable than say a dry white wine, lager, vodka and tonic - several can be drunk within the space of one hour, the alchol content is high, the taste inoccuous and the result deadly!
    Yeah; these alcho-pops are marketed directly to (underage) teens, no matter what the companies that sell them say.

    But then again, teens would still find a way around it. - half the time people mix their own drinks (for example, vodka and coca-cola) anyway.

    I would answer the survey, but I don't really drink. Never been totally drunk in my life. :eek:
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    I don't think the rise of alcopops has caused the rise of binge drinking - I for one and most people I know (in a middle-class area) used to always mix drinks, e.g. vodka and coke from tescos, when I was 15-16 years old.

    By the way, I answered the questionaire with regards to a typical week rather than last week as I have been tee-total for a month due to exams.
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    America's drinking culture is totally different. Probably too different to compare, the age of 21 is wholly ridiculous in my opinion.

    I mean if I want a glass of wine with my meal when I'm there in the summer, it's just tough luck.

    I don't know where this myth of alcopops starting binge drinking comes from, perhaps it has a strong effect in teenage girls, but in my experience the drink of choice for blokes is lager and when younger cider.


    Oh and a quick tip, if you want to avoid revellers on a Friday night, don't go past on a unicycle....
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    (Original post by LibertineNorth)
    What we should do is normalise alcohol consumption. Within the middle classes, drinking wine with dinner etc from an early age is common. It doesn't seem to be so in working class Britain. Guess which group causes trouble as a result...
    I think such generalisations are unhelpful . . . binge drinking is certainly NOT a problem confined to the working class. More working class people probably get done for drink related incidents though - they can't afford decent lawyers in the way affluent professionals can.
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    (Original post by sapphisticated)
    I think such generalisations are unhelpful . . . binge drinking is certainly NOT a problem confined to the working class. More working class people probably get done for drink related incidents though - they can't afford decent lawyers in the way affluent professionals can.
    Here's a hint - when you're up before a district court for kicking in a phone box or something, who your solicitor is doesn't matter a jot. It's got nothing to do with that.

    Middle class teenagers probably drink just as much, if not more. The difference is that they don't do it outside shops etc and generally make a nuisance of themselves. Further and probably as a consequence of that, they don't go around vandalising things or starting fights. I first got trashed at one of my birthday parties - we were all wasted, but we were at home, not causing anyone any problems and this was all going on the the knowledge of our parents. This just doesn't seem to happen amongst the working classes today.
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    (Original post by LibertineNorth)

    Middle class teenagers probably drink just as much, if not more. The difference is that they don't do it outside shops etc and generally make a nuisance of themselves. Further and probably as a consequence of that, they don't go around vandalising things or starting fights.
    What a load of twaddle. Of course they do! If anything, they're worse for it!
 
 
 
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