Anyone done philosophy? Watch

louboutin*
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I have 60 credits to make up in my first year from modules outside my course (psychology) and was thinking about doing philosophy.If anyone is a second year student could you tell me which modules you enjoyed in your first year?
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toddlers crossword
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Well Im not a second year student but i graduated from english and philosophy this year. what are the modules on offer, then I could let you know if I did any of them and if they were any good.
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louboutin*
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(Original post by toddlers crossword)
Well Im not a second year student but i graduated from english and philosophy this year. what are the modules on offer, then I could let you know if I did any of them and if they were any good.
Thanks that would be great There are loads on offer but I'm not sure if they all fit in my timetable.

PHI107 Philosophy of Religion
PHI113 Key Arguments
PHI114 History of Philosophy
PHI115 Reason and Argument
PHI116 Elementary Logic
PHI121 Knowledge, Justification and Doubt
PHI124 Philosophy of Space and Time
PHI125 Matters of Life and Death
PHI126 Mind, Brain and Personal Identity
PHI128 Philosophy of Art and Literature
PHI129 Human Rights

I think thats all of them
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toddlers crossword
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I did Knowledge, Justification and Doubt, Mind Brain and Personal Identity and Matters of Life and Death. Knowledge Justification and Doubt was a little bit dry and one of the more difficult first year modules imo. It was interesting but I probably wouldnt recommend it for someone who isn't going on to do second and third year. Would definitely recommend the other two though, Mind Brain and Personal Identity is pretty interesting and thought provoking, you look into things like can computers really think and could humans have an immaterial soul. Matters of Life and Death is an ethics module and you basically spend one or two weeks looking at some major ethics topics like abortion, animal rights, euthanasia, suicide etc from a philiosophical viewpoint. I enjoyed it because it was the kind of debates that you always had at school or were in the papers etc, but people were giving philosophical arguments for their viewpoints.

Out of the others, I wouldnt recommend elementary logic unless you have an interest in equations, symbols and other math-sy things, from what little logic I did it involves making philosophical arguments into long streams of mathsy nonsense, with a symbol representing each word. tbh id probably avoid things like 'key arguments' and 'reason and argument' as they seem to be more skills based, teaching you how to do philosophy, rather than just being philosophy. more for people that want to carry on to do philosophy than people that want something a bit fun and different for first year.

PS - think going for philosophy modules in your first year is a good plan, as the philosophy dept seem to be quite lenient markers (I got so many firsts for first year essays that I wrote the night before and really werent very good) plus loads of non-philosophy students take modules from inside the school in first year so they dont expect you to have any prior knowledge at all.
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louboutin*
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(Original post by toddlers crossword)
I did Knowledge, Justification and Doubt, Mind Brain and Personal Identity and Matters of Life and Death. Knowledge Justification and Doubt was a little bit dry and one of the more difficult first year modules imo. It was interesting but I probably wouldnt recommend it for someone who isn't going on to do second and third year. Would definitely recommend the other two though, Mind Brain and Personal Identity is pretty interesting and thought provoking, you look into things like can computers really think and could humans have an immaterial soul. Matters of Life and Death is an ethics module and you basically spend one or two weeks looking at some major ethics topics like abortion, animal rights, euthanasia, suicide etc from a philiosophical viewpoint. I enjoyed it because it was the kind of debates that you always had at school or were in the papers etc, but people were giving philosophical arguments for their viewpoints.

Out of the others, I wouldnt recommend elementary logic unless you have an interest in equations, symbols and other math-sy things, from what little logic I did it involves making philosophical arguments into long streams of mathsy nonsense, with a symbol representing each word. tbh id probably avoid things like 'key arguments' and 'reason and argument' as they seem to be more skills based, teaching you how to do philosophy, rather than just being philosophy. more for people that want to carry on to do philosophy than people that want something a bit fun and different for first year.

PS - think going for philosophy modules in your first year is a good plan, as the philosophy dept seem to be quite lenient markers (I got so many firsts for first year essays that I wrote the night before and really werent very good) plus loads of non-philosophy students take modules from inside the school in first year so they dont expect you to have any prior knowledge at all.
Thanks thats been a big help The life and death one and personal identity were the main two I was considering so its good to know they were interesting.I was also thinking about the philosophy of religion because I really need a few credits to bulk up the autumn term. For philosophy is the typical way of testing people coursework, or exams as well?
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toddlers crossword
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(Original post by louboutin*)
Thanks thats been a big help The life and death one and personal identity were the main two I was considering so its good to know they were interesting.I was also thinking about the philosophy of religion because I really need a few credits to bulk up the autumn term. For philosophy is the typical way of testing people coursework, or exams as well?
some modules have exams, but I dont think assessment is ever 100% exam based. Usually you do either two essays or an essay and an exam. They usually spread it out so you have an essay halfway through the semester and then an essay hand in or an exam at the end of the semester.

Im sure philosophy of religion would be interesting, I seem to remember the module outline looking good, and the only reason I didnt do it was because Id covered a lot of it in A-level Religious Studies.
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louboutin*
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(Original post by toddlers crossword)
some modules have exams, but I dont think assessment is ever 100% exam based. Usually you do either two essays or an essay and an exam. They usually spread it out so you have an essay halfway through the semester and then an essay hand in or an exam at the end of the semester.

Im sure philosophy of religion would be interesting, I seem to remember the module outline looking good, and the only reason I didnt do it was because Id covered a lot of it in A-level Religious Studies.
Thanks for all that, definitely think I'm going to go for some philosophy then, now its just the tricky task of checking it fits in my timetable.
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mollymustard
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My friend did Philosophy of Art and Literature and really enjoyed it. I remember reading some of her work and finding it really intreaguing and kind of wishing I'd taken the module.

The website explains:-

Aims/Description: What is art? Can it be defined at all? What do we find so valuable about it? Are judgements of beauty entirely subjective, or might there be a standard to which we can appeal? What are we doing when we ascribe emotional states (like sadness) to music? Why do we have emotional reactions to characters and events that we know are fictional? In particular, why would we go out of our way to have a negative emotional reaction (like pity or fear) to a fiction? This course is an introduction to aesthetics. We examine, from a philosophical point of view, a variety of puzzles posed by art and literature. Further topics include the nature of representation, forgery, tragedy, comedy and horror. Though focused on art, many topics of general philosophical relevance will be raised, and the course will develop students' capacities for careful analysis and reasoned argument.

Some of the questions have considered whether the mona lisa painting is the same as a forgery, and whether cooking is in fact an art.
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louboutin*
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(Original post by mollymustard)
My friend did Philosophy of Art and Literature and really enjoyed it. I remember reading some of her work and finding it really intreaguing and kind of wishing I'd taken the module.

The website explains:-

Aims/Description: What is art? Can it be defined at all? What do we find so valuable about it? Are judgements of beauty entirely subjective, or might there be a standard to which we can appeal? What are we doing when we ascribe emotional states (like sadness) to music? Why do we have emotional reactions to characters and events that we know are fictional? In particular, why would we go out of our way to have a negative emotional reaction (like pity or fear) to a fiction? This course is an introduction to aesthetics. We examine, from a philosophical point of view, a variety of puzzles posed by art and literature. Further topics include the nature of representation, forgery, tragedy, comedy and horror. Though focused on art, many topics of general philosophical relevance will be raised, and the course will develop students' capacities for careful analysis and reasoned argument.

Some of the questions have considered whether the mona lisa painting is the same as a forgery, and whether cooking is in fact an art.
Thanks that does sound quite interesting Are you meant to equally split your credits between the autumn term and spring term, so you do 60 credits in each? Or would it be ok to do 40 credits in the autumn term and 80 in the spring?
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mollymustard
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(Original post by louboutin*)
Thanks that does sound quite interesting Are you meant to equally split your credits between the autumn term and spring term, so you do 60 credits in each? Or would it be ok to do 40 credits in the autumn term and 80 in the spring?
You need to do 60/60 in an ideal world, but they also accept 70/50.
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louboutin*
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(Original post by mollymustard)
You need to do 60/60 in an ideal world, but they also accept 70/50.
OK thanks I know you might not be able to answer this question since it's about sociology but will ask anyway Basically I was thinking about doing some sociology modules, but some modules have a matching module which is a seminar on the same theme as the lecture.

http://www-online.shef.ac.uk:3001/pl...s&disp_year=09

Would I have to do both the modules, or could I get away with just doing the one that is lectures, and not do the one which is seminars?
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