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    Everyone has the right to peaceful protest I believe. It is not acceptable to repeatedly commit a crime to stop a possible infraction of civil rights. And this wasn't even human rights.

    Yes they went, too far. And I hope that they were punished accordingly.
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    Well...to be honest i only think the kids believed they would get sympathy...
    although, one of they boys there had had a rough time (his mum had run away.etc., with suppresed feelings and all the rest).

    I think the guinea pig farm thing is despickable - it has been the worst example of protest, with extensive intimidation of the local community.
    The digging up of recently deceased relatives was something also copied on oxford - holding this for ransom is just sick.
    Its terrible that because they are protesting for animal rights.etc. they can get away with breaking the law.

    When annoyed with any of these sort of protestors, i read this...
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    i nearly cried reading that.

    now thats a protest.
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    hehe - yea, it is one of those news stories that you read ever now and again that reaffirms your faith in humanity!
    I recommend a pay rise for the barrow boys after that performance
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    Loved that article.
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    I believe in justice too (especially about how tony blair is too soft on criminals!)

    When I read about the dead woman being dug up, I was horrified! That's a sickening way to protest!
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    (Original post by Moondust)
    I believe in justice too (especially about how tony blair is too soft on criminals!)

    When I read about the dead woman being dug up, I was horrified! That's a sickening way to protest!
    Yes that was foul and disrespectful. Nobody should ever be taken from their grave to promote any cause.

    :mad:

    *adds member*
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    (Original post by Beekeeper)
    Yes that was foul and disrespectful. Nobody should ever be taken from their grave to promote any cause.

    :mad:

    *adds member*
    You would think in death people would get some peace.
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    (Original post by kalibantre)
    You would think in death people would get some peace.
    The wrongdoer should be shoved in a nature reserve with a load of tigers
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    (Original post by Beekeeper)
    The wrongdoer should be shoved in a nature reserve with a load of tigers
    Well - i'm sure the tigers would respect that these particular humans had not harmed their fellow animals and leave them well alone would they boll....
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    Grrrr.

    Has anyone else seen this news article yet? Disgusting! :mad:

    A serious drug dealer has been spared a prison sentence because "prisons are overflowing" and it is a "comparatively" minor offence! And this is a judge speaking!

    I'll embolden the important/particularly annoying bits:

    Mayor's anger at judge's decision

    The Mayor of Middlesbrough has hit out at a judge's decision to allow a heroin dealer to walk free from court.
    Ray Mallon said he was outraged after Thomas Scarth of Roseberry Road, Redcar received 100 hours community punishment and a 12-month suspended jail term.

    The 19-year-old had pleaded guilty at Teesside Crown Court to possessing a Class A drug with intent to supply.

    Judge Guy Whitburn said prisons were overflowing, but Mr Mallon accused him of failing to show good judgement.

    Scarth had been caught in an undercover police operation with 83 portions of heroin.

    'Comparatively minor'

    In sentencing him, Judge Whitburn said: "Prisons are full to overflowing.

    "You have pleaded guilty. You are a young man and we are urged not to imprison young men for offences of this nature if they are of a comparatively minor scale."

    Mr Mallon, Middlesbrough's elected Mayor said: "Crown court judges are supposed to have good judgement, and they are also there to protect the public.

    "On this occasion he failed to protect the public, and failed to show good judgement.

    "I am so outraged by this particular case that I intend to write to the Lord Chancellor."
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/4582552.stm
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    i wondered where this society was...its wierd that it died the day i left the country

    the major obviously has no idea about the current government - the lord chancelors response will probably be "what a fantastic idea"
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    83 portions of heroin is very little. There's enough in many ways to be considered personal use or 'supply' to you and your friends - who are victims of greater things...
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    (Original post by bikerx23)
    i wondered where this society was...its wierd that it died the day i left the country

    the major obviously has no idea about the current government - the lord chancelors response will probably be "what a fantastic idea"
    hehe :p:

    This mayor is a genius, theres nobody on the planet more blunt and to-the-point.

    A few BBC headlines:

    "'Robocop' proposes child removal"

    "'Robocop' advises zero tolerance"

    "'Robocop' takes on Oxford Union"

    "Mallon to restrict council questions"

    "Mallon turns detective
    Former detective turned mayor Ray Mallon claims the theft of his £60,000 mayoral chain of office was an "inside job"."

    :rofl:

    http://newssearch.bbc.co.uk/cgi-bin/...8&q=ray+mallon
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    supplying to your friends is still counted as dealing - since there was a 24 year difference between the standard sentence and the actual one handed out, this is a serious miscarriage of justice.

    --------------

    a vigilante mayor would make a wicked tv programme :rofl:
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    (Original post by bikerx23)
    supplying to your friends is still counted as dealing - since there was a 24 year difference between the standard sentence and the actual one handed out, this is a serious miscarriage of justice.
    Supplying your friends is qualitatively different from carrying a kilo (roughly 10,000 portions or cut over 20k+) and flogging it on en masse.

    The person has admitted their mistake, has never offended before, is a young person with a lot to do in life and will get treated for his addiction - hopefully to lead a normal, productive and crime-free life.

    I know there is a case at UCL of a student who has been caught with class A drugs in sufficient quantity to have been charged with supply because it is over the amount considered personal use (typically enough for one person to take in a day without ODing). He's a young person with a bright future ahead of him, first time caught and has already definitely learnt a lot from the experience.

    Why stick him in when he's learnt his lesson already and has reformed?
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Why stick him in when he's learnt his lesson already and has reformed?
    You're suggesting that by pleading guilty one is reformed?

    What message do you think you're sending out, when you effectively shake drug dealing off as some petty minor offence?

    Dealing class A-drugs is a serious offence and it should attract some form of effective punishment. Community service, what a joke.

    This isn't really what concerns me the most with regards to this case though, i'm far more concerned by the judge's reasoning. Overcrowding in prisons should quite simply not be an issue at all, and it appears the judge has considered this in making his judgement, and compared the dealer to 'comparatively' more serious offenders (murderers, rapists).
    Drug dealing has a huge impact on the wider community, and causes misery to other lives. A criminal who is effectively the nucleus of the whole problem should be punished, if only to deter others.

    This is absotely unacceptable, and exposes serious problems in our legal system. Drug dealers are not being punished enough, and we haven't got enough prisons to put them in!
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    (Original post by Beekeeper)
    You're suggesting that by pleading guilty one is reformed?
    No, I'm suggesting it shows he knows he has done wrong and was willing to accept the punishment that would be handed out and would, from the sentence, be willing to reform.

    What message do you think you're sending out, when you effectively condone drug dealing as some petty minor offence?
    I think drug dealing is a relatively minor offense given that the far more dangerous than almost every illegal drug, alcohol, is legal.

    But I think the message being sent out is that "possession of very small quantities that more or less reach levels of personal consumption, for young people, who have no record, who show willingness to change, who know they done wrong - we will give a second chance".

    Dealing class A-drugs is a serious offence and it should attract some form of punishment.
    A year on his head plus extra if he is caught again sounds like punishment to me!

    This isn't really what concerns me the most with regards to this case though, i'm far more concerned by the judge's reasoning. Overcrowding in prisons should quite simply not be an issue at all, and it appears the judge has considered this in making his judgement, and compared him to 'comparatively' more serious offenders (murderers, rapists).
    I agree. But the reality is, there are only something like 300 empty prison spaces in the country. Something like 1200 people are out there on electronic tagging etc.

    There isn't enough prison space. The judge is forced to pick between small time drug 'dealers'/users and people committing really serious crimes...

    This is absotely unacceptable, and exposes serious problems in our legal system. Drug dealers are not being punished enough, and we haven't got enough prisons to put them in!
    The problem is the government policy on strangely not building more prisons (of course, this is because it is very hard to find a place for them - no one wants to live anywhere near a prison if possible!). Not the legal system.
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    people plead innocent if they think they will get off, the plead guilty if they know they cant because it will reduce their sentence - simple.
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    (Original post by bikerx23)
    people plead innocent if they think they will get off, the plead guilty if they know they cant because it will reduce their sentence - simple.
    Or people plead not guilty if they can produce evidence which will help lower their sentence/lead to a lesser charge.

    They will take the course of action that leads to the lowest expected penalty (as a preference combination of mean and variance based on their risk profile).

    Once you start talking about choice and for someone to pick, Economists start rolling in... especially when it's intertemporal choice facing uncertainty with asymmetric information
 
 
 
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