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State or Private for Sixth Form? watch

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    Well this is going to turn into a general waffle but here we go:
    I went to a fantastic state primary school which I loved, and then went on to a 320 pupil all-girls private school which means I have to travel two hours a day. I live so far away none of my friends are nearby and I'm fed up with having no social life or love interests! I have two choices for Sixth form, I can stay where I am, or I can move to a nearby state school with a reasonable reputation and quite a good mixed 6th form with over 100 ppl in each year. I have effectively made the decision to go but I am worried that it will be a massive culture shock for me and I won't make any friends etc. I think a mixed sixth form would be a better place for me but I'm a bit apprehensive about what it'll be like. A couple of people from my old primary school are going there too which means I'll know a couple of people but I haven't been in touch with them for 5 years! Has anyone else made the transition from private to state? I would be really grateful for any help/opinions/advice/reassurance.
    Thanks!
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    Personally I've been state-educated all my life, so I can't offer any first-hand experiences, but it sounds to me like you've pretty much decided that you want to move to the state school and are just a bit nervous. That's perfectly understandable, and I know I'd be the same if I'd moved to a private school for sixth form. I don't think you'll have any problems though. If you'd moved from private to state during compulsory education, it probably would have been a massive shock to the system, but in sixth form, only those who actually want to learn are still there and most people have grown up, so it's fine. It will be a chance to meet new people and broaden your horizons before going to university or getting a job, and I certainly wouldn't like having to travel for 2 hours every day!
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    Ummm... I have done exactly the same as you. I was in a state primary school for 7 years, and moved into a private school for secondary education. I decided to stay on for sixth form in the private school, theres only going to be about 15 people. My decision was mainly based upon the education that I will be receiving (I would get a better one if I remained in a private school, plus I know the teachers, and the way they teach, so I've actually chosen subjects in regards to that). I know how you feel, because I soooo wanted to go to a state school, where I can meet loads of new people, and catch up with old friends from primary school. However, there are boys in our sixth form and I got close friends who are also staying on in the sixth form. Just think that there are only two years left before you go into university, and is the move to a state school a risk to your education. Hope that helps. Might reply later if I think of anymore to say. Ciao!! =)
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    Thanks very much both of you for your insight
    I just get worried because my school seems like a little world of its own and the only other people my age I see wandering down the street in town or whatever seem like not exactly the kind of people I want to make friends with. I just never seem to meet any nice people my age out of school. This is why I'm concerned about moving to a state school. Please nobody take this as me dissing state schools! Because that's not what I intend, I actually want to go to one! 'Cause I think I'm motivated enough to work hard at 6th form, and I feel like we're too restricted at our private school, about petty things like jewellery. Also we're forced to go to chapel, and being an atheist I think this is actually in violation of human rights!
    The thing I am worried about really is moving schools and then finding that I don't make any friends and everyone is horrible! Which I know is a stupid idea to have but it's a product of being in such a protected environment as it is at a private school. I hope the change will go fine and I'll get on well. I'm just apprehensive! I really will relish the new independence and freedom I'll have though, because I'm fed up of being told off about "rolling up sleeves" or "having more than one ear piercing". It's pathetic really. Well thanks very much guys and I'd appreciate any other comments
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    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    Thanks very much both of you for your insight
    I just get worried because my school seems like a little world of its own and the only other people my age I see wandering down the street in town or whatever seem like not exactly the kind of people I want to make friends with. I just never seem to meet any nice people my age out of school. This is why I'm concerned about moving to a state school. Please nobody take this as me dissing state schools! Because that's not what I intend, I actually want to go to one! 'Cause I think I'm motivated enough to work hard at 6th form, and I feel like we're too restricted at our private school, about petty things like jewellery. Also we're forced to go to chapel, and being an atheist I think this is actually in violation of human rights!
    The thing I am worried about really is moving schools and then finding that I don't make any friends and everyone is horrible! Which I know is a stupid idea to have but it's a product of being in such a protected environment as it is at a private school. I hope the change will go fine and I'll get on well. I'm just apprehensive! I really will relish the new independence and freedom I'll have though, because I'm fed up of being told off about "rolling up sleeves" or "having more than one ear piercing". It's pathetic really. Well thanks very much guys and I'd appreciate any other comments
    Don't worry, there are some decent people in state schools as well as all the negative stereotypes. As I said in my previous post, most people like that drop out after GCSEs anyway and there are very few people in my sixth form that I don't get on with. Sixth form could be the perfect opportunity to break out of your 'bubble', as it were, and experience a bit more of life. After all, you'll be with a huge variety of people if you go to university, and it certainly won't be protected there, so it may be best to get used to it before you go.
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    Don't worry, there are some decent people in state schools as well as all the negative stereotypes. As I said in my previous post, most people like that drop out after GCSEs anyway and there are very few people in my sixth form that I don't get on with. Sixth form could be the perfect opportunity to break out of your 'bubble', as it were, and experience a bit more of life. After all, you'll be with a huge variety of people if you go to university, and it certainly won't be protected there, so it may be best to get used to it before you go.


    Thanks very much again I really appreciate this. My mum went to school with a woman who grew up in a very rich family, married an extremely rich man, bought a massive 10 bedroomed house and had 3 kids, all of whom were sent to private school. The eldest one has attained fantastic A-level grades and gone on to study medicine at uni, however she hates it and has been finding that there's next to nobody who've had it handed to them on a plate like she has. Her parents bought a really expensive house right near the university she's studying at for her to stay in, and so she's finding it hard to make friends because she's got no roomies and doesn't live in the halls of residence. I do NOT want to end up like her! My parents aren't that rich and have had to make sacrifices to send me to private school. The thing is my school has really buggered me up because there's really two categories of people in my 30-pupil year. There's townies with parents in the forces and there's snobs with bucketfuls of cash. There's only me and my friend who don't fall into either of those categories. So I'm hoping to go to a "normal" school and meet some nice people. Somehow unless all the state schools near me are awful I am never sending a kid of mine to private school. Thanks so much again for your advice and reassurance
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    At a state school the expectations that the staff have for students is likely to be much lower so if you intend to get A grades in your A-Levels you're going to have to motivate yourself and do some work at home even if you haven't actually been set any work.

    in sixth form, only those who actually want to learn are still there and most people have grown up, so it's fine
    Surely the implementation of bonuses like EMA is making this less and less true. More and more time wasters are staying on because it's easy money, they just turn up but don't bother thinking hard or doing any work out of lessons.
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    Ahhh no worries. There's nothing to worry about, I'm sure there are loads of people who you can meet and be friends with at state school. Go for it, and I wish you luck for the future.
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    Surely the implementation of bonuses like EMA is making this less and less true. More and more time wasters are staying on because it's easy money, they just turn up but don't bother thinking hard or doing any work out of lessons.
    True, but most of these will be on one-year GNVQ courses, so if you're doing A-levels/AVCEs, you're unlikely to encounter many of them.
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    At a state school the expectations that the staff have for students is likely to be much lower so if you intend to get A grades in your A-Levels you're going to have to motivate yourself and do some work at home even if you haven't actually been set any work.

    Surely the implementation of bonuses like EMA is making this less and less true. More and more time wasters are staying on because it's easy money, they just turn up but don't bother thinking hard or doing any work out of lessons.
    I go to a sixth form college and I don't agree. Time wasters tend to drop out in the first few months or before the end of the year, and just because it's not linked to a secondary school or private doesn't mean the students aren't monitored, tracked and phoned if they miss lessons, and there are parents' evenings twice a year as well as letters etc. sent home to monitor progress. People don't just stay for the 'easy money', and there aren't that many who claim it anyway since the amount parents can earn is so low.

    I do agree though, that the people who came to my college from private schools had trouble motivating themselves because of the more relaxed atmosphere, being able to go home/out for lunch/shopping in free periods etc., but if you're prepared to work then you'll have no trouble. You don't necessarily need to do work you haven't been set to get A grades.

    However, I'd recommend a good sixth form college rather than a sixth form at a state school where everyone has known each other for years and subject choice is limited (by staff and timetabling). If, however, you're intending to apply for Oxbridge, I'd stay on at your private school.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    True, but most of these will be on one-year GNVQ courses, so if you're doing A-levels/AVCEs, you're unlikely to encounter many of them.
    To some extent that's true. There are some nice people in state schools but some of the less motivated ones wouldn be doing much better in a private school.
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    To some extent that's true. There are some nice people in state schools but some of the less motivated ones wouldn be doing much better in a private school.
    Agreed. I think for those who are intelligent and work hard, it doesn't matter quite so much whether they go to a state or a private school, but for those in the middle or towards the bottom of the scale, they would definitely perform better at private schools.
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    just because it's not linked to a secondary school or private doesn't mean the students aren't monitored, tracked and phoned if they miss lessons, and there are parents' evenings twice a year as well as letters etc. sent home to monitor progress.
    But sixth form isn't just about 'turning up for lessons'. You should be aiming to do the very best you can do and should do some study out of lessons. At your sixth form there isn't even one lazy person who gets EMA and does little work?

    You don't necessarily need to do work you haven't been set to get A grades.
    I find it rather disappointing that in my sixth form at least, targets set at the start of the AS year are so low. They used the ALIS test and told me to aim for C in A-Level maths. I found out that at the start of this year they actually predicted some people 'E' in subjects, but let them start the course and actually told them the predictions. If they're predicting people anything below a C then they're surely not going to be driving the class hard enough for people to get A's.
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    I go to a sixth form college and I don't agree. Time wasters tend to drop out in the first few months or before the end of the year, and just because it's not linked to a secondary school or private doesn't mean the students aren't monitored, tracked and phoned if they miss lessons, and there are parents' evenings twice a year as well as letters etc. sent home to monitor progress. People don't just stay for the 'easy money', and there aren't that many who claim it anyway since the amount parents can earn is so low. I do agree though, that the people who came to my college from private schools had trouble motivating themselves because of the more relaxed atmosphere, being able to go home/out for lunch/shopping in free periods etc., but if you're prepared to work then you'll have no trouble. You don't necessarily need to do work you haven't been set to get A grades.

    However, I'd recommend a good sixth form college rather than a sixth form at a state school where everyone has known each other for years and subject choice is limited (by staff and timetabling). If, however, you're intending to apply for Oxbridge, I'd stay on at your private school.

    Why do I have to stay at my private school to go to Oxbridge? The state school 6th form I'm going to has FAR better resources than my private school. Also I am aiming for A-grades. GCSEs permitting, I am hoping to take Biology, German, Politics and Government and one other subject I'm undecided on as of yet. In Biology and German I'm predicted A* at GCSE and I think I do have the work ethic to push myself to achieve what I'm capable of. The subject choice isn't limited and there are at least 30 more subjects available than at my present school. There aren't any 6th form colleges round here, just the old grammar school, which is the one I'm going to, or the old secondary modern which has a terrible reputation. Then there's my present school 25 miles away. I'm not too worried about the academic side of things, as my chances of getting into Oxbridge would be miniscule anyway and I'd rather concentrate on getting into another good uni like Durham, Exeter, Bristol etc. The main things I'm worried about are a) being ostracised because of being from a private school and b) not making any new friends. I was looking forward to a better social life as well. Keep the opinions coming!
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    I considered moving to an alternative sixth-form as well, but as I have been privately educated since pre-prep (3) - all the time at the same school - I would find it difficult to move and re-adjust. I am happy that next year I will be in the same surroundings which I am used to, and probably with some of the same teachers I have grown to like as well. I can't see any reason for me to re-locate for the final two years of my school-based education.

    Obviously you seem a little less "attached" to your school, and I think only you can make the decision which will suit you best.
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    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    Why do I have to stay at my private school to go to Oxbridge?
    You don't. I think what the poster meant was that you'll be pushed harder at your private school, so it'll be easier to get the grades and you'd also probably get more help with your application. It sounds like you're very well-motivated though and capable of getting As without being pushed

    As for being ostracisted because you went to a private school, I think it's more likely that people may feel awkward around you and unsure of how to act at first because a lot of state school students, myself included, have never met anyone from a private school and there's a lot of mystery surrounding you lot! I would have hoped though that by the time they reach sixth form, most people are mature enough to accept someone 'different' and they won't give you a hard time over it.
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    As for being ostracisted because you went to a private school, I think it's more likely that people may feel awkward around you and unsure of how to act at first because a lot of state school students, myself included, have never met anyone from a private school and there's a lot of mystery surrounding you lot! I would have hoped though that by the time they reach sixth form, most people are mature enough to accept someone 'different' and they won't give you a hard time over it.
    I hope you're right! No I'm sure there are lots of nice people at state schools, it's just so long since I went to one it's sort of the same situation, awkwardness, wondering if they find the same things funny etc. Without going for a rant on "yob culture", I find the fact that most other people my age on the street are vandalising something or smoking something illegal embarassing... does anyone agree? It actually has dented my confidence about going to a mainstream school because I don't want to be stuck in a class with lowlifes like that. Not that state school pupils are lowlifes, I'm just saying as a general comment.
    Thanks :cool:
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    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    Well this is going to turn into a general waffle but here we go:
    I went to a fantastic state primary school which I loved, and then went on to a 320 pupil all-girls private school which means I have to travel two hours a day. I live so far away none of my friends are nearby and I'm fed up with having no social life or love interests! I have two choices for Sixth form, I can stay where I am, or I can move to a nearby state school with a reasonable reputation and quite a good mixed 6th form with over 100 ppl in each year. I have effectively made the decision to go but I am worried that it will be a massive culture shock for me and I won't make any friends etc. I think a mixed sixth form would be a better place for me but I'm a bit apprehensive about what it'll be like. A couple of people from my old primary school are going there too which means I'll know a couple of people but I haven't been in touch with them for 5 years! Has anyone else made the transition from private to state? I would be really grateful for any help/opinions/advice/reassurance.
    Thanks!
    looooads of my friends have done this. they moved to the local state sixth form with a very good reputation. socially, they've had no problems whatsoever, and noone really cares where you come from. like many people have said, by this stage most people have grown up! however, make sure that the school you want to move to is as academically up to scratch as your present one (i'm assuming that the private school offers a better education). sometimes the class sizes at state schools can be a bit large, but in terms of university applications, coming from a state school shouldn't pose a problem. most unis are falling over themselves to admit state school students, and i would imagine that your chances wouldn't change much by moving to the state sector. good luck with your decision!
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    But sixth form isn't just about 'turning up for lessons'. You should be aiming to do the very best you can do and should do some study out of lessons. At your sixth form there isn't even one lazy person who gets EMA and does little work?

    I find it rather disappointing that in my sixth form at least, targets set at the start of the AS year are so low. They used the ALIS test and told me to aim for C in A-Level maths. I found out that at the start of this year they actually predicted some people 'E' in subjects, but let them start the course and actually told them the predictions. If they're predicting people anything below a C then they're surely not going to be driving the class hard enough for people to get A's.
    Yeah, but if there are a couple of people who don't work as hard then so what? It's not like they're disrupting anyone else or affecting the way the teachers work.

    I can't comment on Maths or your particular sixth form, but at mine and for the subjects I do, I had no problem getting As based on what I learnt in class. Maybe it's down to the individual sixth form or subject.

    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    There aren't any 6th form colleges round here, just the old grammar school, which is the one I'm going to, or the old secondary modern which has a terrible reputation. Then there's my present school 25 miles away. I'm not too worried about the academic side of things, as my chances of getting into Oxbridge would be miniscule anyway and I'd rather concentrate on getting into another good uni like Durham, Exeter, Bristol etc.
    Fair enough then lol.

    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    The main things I'm worried about are a) being ostracised because of being from a private school and b) not making any new friends. I was looking forward to a better social life as well.
    I don't think anyone will say anything about you being from a private school, and although those couple of people you mentioned would know, surely you wouldn't have to make an announcement to everyone about it? :p:
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    (Original post by E_J_C_2000)
    I hope you're right! No I'm sure there are lots of nice people at state schools, it's just so long since I went to one it's sort of the same situation, awkwardness, wondering if they find the same things funny etc. Without going for a rant on "yob culture", I find the fact that most other people my age on the street are vandalising something or smoking something illegal embarassing... does anyone agree? It actually has dented my confidence about going to a mainstream school because I don't want to be stuck in a class with lowlifes like that. Not that state school pupils are lowlifes, I'm just saying as a general comment.
    Thanks :cool:
    That embarrasses me too, but honestly, I can't name a single person in my sixth form like that. There will probably be a few in the lower years, but you'll hopefully have a separate sixth form block, so you won't have to see them much anyway.
 
 
 
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