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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    I really feel for your parents, spending so much money on a private education for you when you can't even grasp the simple concept that just because someone earns less than £30k a year, it does not mean they're lazy, they're on benefits or they lack qualifications! No matter how many times I attempt to point that out to you, you just can't seem to take it in. Can you offer anything constructive to this thread, or just offensive, unfair generalisations about people you know nothing about?
    No, I don't think he meant that. Seaspray meant just because people are on a low income doesn't mean they don't work hard. So he did not suggest people were lazy. And I disagree seaspray has contributed alot to this thread.
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    (Original post by seaspray)
    Your point? What's your problem with how I am educated? That has noting to do with the distribution of EMA. Okay, it may affect my opinion, but then your background affects your opinion too.
    nope it doesn't........i never said i didnt go to a private school as well or know people as snobbish as you

    (Original post by jiggaman7)
    whats the point in your post at all...somebody suggested using vouchers instead of money and i said it was much more unlikely to act as an incentive as cash....
    You imply that the cash they receive provides the incentive, and argue that vouchers for books/travel etc won't have the same effect. Therefore you make our argument that the majority are probably purely in it for the chance to make a quick buck without succeeding in their A-Levels!

    FYI, serious, academically-minded students, no matter what background they are from, should not require an incentive to continue their education/learning. By all means, those from backgrounds which cannot afford travel etc to school are more than welcome to have that facilitated for them, but handouts of cash are ludicrous! Is it not enough that education is free, schools provide text books, councils will subsidise/pay for transport to and from school for those who cannot afford it, and so on?
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    I really feel for your parents, spending so much money on a private education for you when you can't even grasp the simple concept that just because someone earns less than £30k a year, it does not mean they're lazy, they're on benefits or they lack qualifications! No matter how many times I attempt to point that out to you, you just can't seem to take it in. Can you offer anything constructive to this thread, or just offensive, unfair generalisations about people you know nothing about?
    Maybe you should explain your point instead of simply stating it. What other reasons can you think of? Oh, and not the one about them "not wanting" a well paid job.
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    (Original post by john williams)
    I dont see why so many people are wasting their time debating and being against the benefit, as there are much more wasteful benefit expenditures where people play the system as well as other areas where alot more money gets wasted by govts and EU etc.
    Because everyone knows a lot about this and people who don't get it are resentful.
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    I agree, it should be there to help, not as 'persuasion'.
    well if it this money helps you...does it not therefore act in acting as an added incentive/persuasion to stay in education
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    (Original post by phillipsm)
    FYI, serious, academically-minded students, no matter what background they are from, should not require an incentive to continue their education/learning.
    That's exactly what I said earlier. It's a shame some people on this thread can't grasp that simple concept, Kellywood.
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    (Original post by phillipsm)
    You imply that the cash they receive provides the incentive, and argue that vouchers for books/travel etc won't have the same effect. Therefore you make our argument that the majority are probably purely in it for the chance to make a quick buck without succeeding in their A-Levels!

    FYI, serious, academically-minded students, no matter what background they are from, should not require an incentive to continue their education/learning. By all means, those from backgrounds which cannot afford travel etc to school are more than welcome to have that facilitated for them, but handouts of cash are ludicrous! Is it not enough that education is free, schools provide text books, councils will subsidise/pay for transport to and from school for those who cannot afford it, and so on?
    Exactly
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    (Original post by seaspray)
    Maybe you should explain your point instead of simply stating it. What other reasons can you think of? Oh, and not the one about them "not wanting" a well paid job.
    Maybe they have to work part-time to raise small children. Maybe they weren't as priveleged as you are and went to a crap school where they weren't expected to get very far. Maybe there are no decent jobs in their area, but they can't afford to move. There are lots of reasons, not just 'they're lazy, they slacked off at school.'
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    (Original post by jiggaman7)
    well if it this money helps you...does it not therefore act in acting as an added incentive/persuasion to stay in education
    No, because it can be provided in the form of vouchers and bus tickets.
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    (Original post by phillipsm)
    You imply that the cash they receive provides the incentive, and argue that vouchers for books/travel etc won't have the same effect. Therefore you make our argument that the majority are probably purely in it for the chance to make a quick buck without succeeding in their A-Levels!

    FYI, serious, academically-minded students, no matter what background they are from, should not require an incentive to continue their education/learning. By all means, those from backgrounds which cannot afford travel etc to school are more than welcome to have that facilitated for them, but handouts of cash are ludicrous! Is it not enough that education is free, schools provide text books, councils will subsidise/pay for transport to and from school for those who cannot afford it, and so on?
    textbooks at a state school near me arent free....you either get one with barely any pages left or pay 20-25 quid a pop for a new one.

    (Original post by jiggaman7)
    what do you think that most people on EMA will go into sixth form fail and come staright back out and not go to uni? well quite a few may but many dont....if you are unsure whether to carry on studying or go into work..because university is expensive than this money may help you make that decision....for some it may just be an added help because they would have gone to sixth form...many people may use it to save up for university,may use it to pay for transport to get to school, may give it to their parents, they may even use it to pay for driving lessons and test which their parents cant afford to pay for and because they dont work but are in study they only have this money.....
    the govt obviously wants a more skilled workforce than is currently present and with EMA many more people will have A-levels and may even go onto do degrees afterwards(not all underpriveleged people are drug-using binge drinkers just so you know)
    Please do not make parallels with the financial support such individuals are entitled to at university - the majority receive 100% of the student loan, and are the only individuals entitled to apply for university bursaries, scholarships, hardship funds, HE grants, travel bursaries, accommodation bursaries and so forth. Basically, they get their university education paid for them. How is that fair for middle class students whose parents can afford to pay, but who are hit hard by the payments?

    Further, you suggest that some individuals use EMA, or should, to pay for driving lessons and so forth. No doubt they do, but this is against EMA regulations (which are laxly applied). Further, while education is a right, driving is not. EMA is not meant to facilitate luxuries, or fund a social life, or fund a home life - it is only for educational purposes. And all the more reason for it not to be in the form of cash handouts, but school-issued vouchers instead.
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    I am hard working as well and it just annoys me that there's just no reward.
    Your reward will be your good grades. The EMA is not a reward.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Maybe they have to work part-time to raise small children. Maybe they weren't as priveleged as you are and went to a crap school where they weren't expected to get very far. Maybe there are no decent jobs in their area, but they can't afford to move. There are lots of reasons, not just 'they're lazy, they slacked off at school.'
    And we are not saying alot of people don't deserve the ema. We are saying the system is corrupt were people are using the money to support social lives buy shoes ect. Or are simply recieving it when they are not in need of it.
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    For those who need it, it can be a very postitive contribution and I am all for it.
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    (Original post by seaspray)
    That's exactly what I said earlier. It's a shame some people on this thread can't grasp that simple concept, Kellywood.
    For your information, since you're tucked away in your posh school in your posh area and have no idea what life is like for people not as fortunate as yourself, most people who receive EMA do want to go to school and get qualifications. Howeevr, they may be under pressure from their parents to quit and get a full-time job to contribute to the upkeep of the family, so if they get money for studying, that will reduce the need for work and encourage them to consider staying on.
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    (Original post by soulsussed)
    If people genuinly need it then its a good contribution to them and I am totally for it but its when people are spending it on shoes and outings when it annoys me.
    Yes, that is the incentive for the poorer students to stay in college.
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    (Original post by phillipsm)
    You imply that the cash they receive provides the incentive, and argue that vouchers for books/travel etc won't have the same effect. Therefore you make our argument that the majority are probably purely in it for the chance to make a quick buck without succeeding in their A-Levels!

    FYI, serious, academically-minded students, no matter what background they are from, should not require an incentive to continue their education/learning. By all means, those from backgrounds which cannot afford travel etc to school are more than welcome to have that facilitated for them, but handouts of cash are ludicrous! Is it not enough that education is free, schools provide text books, councils will subsidise/pay for transport to and from school for those who cannot afford it, and so on?
    Ah at last...someone who has summed up how i feel!!!! THANK YOU

    (Original post by jiggaman7)
    textbooks at a state school near me arent free....you either get one with barely any pages left or pay 20-25 quid a pop for a new one.
    Then the school really should be closed down!

    Further, that does not negate the argument that EMA should be in the form of vouchers which can only be used for stationary, textbooks and so forth. Oh - you never did address the issue of transport in my last post...
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Yes, that is the incentive for the poorer students to stay in college.
    In that case they should not be there because they clearly not interested in getting a qualification at the end of it all
 
 
 
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