Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    14
    (Original post by seaspray)
    Why on earth is she wasting her own time and tax payers money by staying in education if she will receive two D-grades? I'm sorry, but I find that totally rediculous. Her time would be better spent on a course which she is actually good at and enjoys (she can't really be enjoying subjects in which she is at D-grade level). As already mentioned, she will need at least 3 A-levels for virtually any univerisity course, and she could spend her time more productively elsewhere.
    She enjoys the subjects that she does. She has a university offfer and wants to get a degree to better herself and the life she was brought into. She lives in a really rough area and her family life isn't great therefore she doesn't want to stay in that life and have kids who will just get sucked into the same cycle. Just because she may not be good at exams doesn't mean that she is wasting her time. Anyway she has had a lot of problems this year but the fact that she is in a grammar school for 6th form after doing her GCSEs at a low performing school shows she must have something going her in life. I think it is people who say things like she is wasting her time who make her even more determined to go to uni and do a course she enjoys (which she will need Alevels to get onto) and experience what she wants in life.

    For your information she was doing 3 subjects (plus GS) but was forced to drop one by school so she could focus on the two needed for her degree in the hope of getting possibly C's or B's...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I dont think it matters what grades people get - whether they should get the payment or not. Ok so if they are getting 'U' grades and not tunring up for lessons then thats more serious. But not everyone is able to get As Bs and Cs. And just because people may get Ds it doesnt mean that they are wasting their time as it is still a respectable grade - and one that some university courses will accept. Ok so you cant become a doctor or a Lawyer with 2 Ds but there are alot of other things you can do aswell. I'm all for EMA. I think the benefit of it outweights the bad points.

    Dare I ask what course and university she has applied for?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I used to get EMA until I stopped turning up to general studies. I abused it once or twice but in general the money got saved and spent on paints and materials. An art student can quite easily spend £30 a week on schoolwork consistently.

    And before I get called a lazy sod from a long line of lazy sods, my dad left school at age 14 and went into work. Him and my mum eventually became self employed and made a life for three of us youngens. I got a foundation award so I could go to the school I'm in and eventually got EMA since I couldn't afford things I needed on top of getting to school.

    Making generalisations such as anyone on benefit is a waster is a sign of overwhelming ignorance. Are you really stupid enough to believe the system would still exist if it didn't help countless families. What would I know, my dad died of a heart attack at 41 and left us with a business that we couldn't run or sell, widows benefit was spent on heroin and prostitutes...

    Not selling a sob story but I think by putting not only a real life example forward but my own experience its hard for you to argue with me about the validity of the things I've said.

    (Original post by Gordy)
    I used to get EMA until I stopped turning up to general studies. I abused it once or twice but in general the money got saved and spent on paints and materials. An art student can quite easily spend £30 a week on schoolwork consistently.
    The fact that you a) didn't turn up to GS, and b) abused the system shows a lack of commitment on your part. Also, any abuse of the system is simply not good enough. Your personal example also shows how ineffective the system is, especially if it cannot encourage you to turn up to something as 'simple' as GS.

    And before I get called a lazy sod from a long line of lazy sods, my dad left school at age 14 and went into work. Him and my mum eventually became self employed and made a life for three of us youngens. I got a foundation award so I could go to the school I'm in and eventually got EMA since I couldn't afford things I needed on top of getting to school.
    You go to a fee-paying school - they should provide you with art materials. Further, how can you differentiate between the relative monetary value of different subjects re EMA?

    Perhaps if you didn't go to a fee-paying school (as do many students), even if you have a Foundation Award, then you would be able to afford other things.

    Making generalisations such as anyone on benefit is a waster is a sign of overwhelming ignorance. Are you really stupid enough to believe the system would still exist if it didn't help countless families. What would I know, my dad died of a heart attack at 41 and left us with a business that we couldn't run or sell, widows benefit was spent on heroin and prostitutes...

    Not selling a sob story but I think by putting not only a real life example forward but my own experience its hard for you to argue with me about the validity of the things I've said.
    Didn't quite understand your comment about heroine and so forth...underclass? :confused:
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phillipsm)
    And here, again, comes the argument that anyone who really wanted to continue their education and succeed would not need more of an incentive than that! You also fail, then, to answer our solution to the system: vouchers instead of cash. Why not? Not enough of an incentive for you or other EMA students?
    I agree that vouchers would be better, but it's not a practical solution. Sure, people could be given free bus passes and Stationery Box vouchers, but what happens when there's an expensive school trip that a student really needs to go on, but simply can't afford? They couldn't use vouchers for that, they'd need money. Oh, and for your information, I'm at sixth form to learn, do well in my A-levels and go to university, not just to get EMA, so please stop it with the generalisations.

    (Original post by phillipsm)
    What makes you think that the majority of EMA recipients are deserving? Why discriminate against all students in favour of a few? Just about all students face the same money troubles; all could do with an "incentive". And please don't get me started on the benefits system - it does next to nothing, and creates a culture of dependency and an underclass. If a system is abused, it's not working.
    Because I know a lot of people in my school who are on EMA and very few of them fit the stereotypical description of someone who is lazy and disruptive. I'm not naive enough to say that everyone on EMA deserves it because the present system is too lax for that to be the case, but in my opinion, the majority are, so why should they be made to suffer because of a minority of idiots who abuse the system? How is it discriminating against other students? It's not like they make the people who don't get EMA pay for it. As mentioned many times before, there has to be a cut-off point; the government can't afford to pay everyone, so obviously those who need the money the most should get it. As for benefits, I agree the system is flawed, but how would you like it if an accident left you seriously disabled, you couldn't work and when you tried to claim benfits, you were told to stop being a dependent scrounger? Just because a few people abuse the system doesn't mean we should get rid of it,

    (Original post by phillipsm)
    If they cannot achieve highly in further/higher education, then surely they are not suited to it and should take on a vocational course instead? That seems logical to me. Why pay individuals to achieve a C or less? Anything less than a C is, quite frankly, a bit worthless. It's just as luducrous as suggesting that 50% or more of the population should have a university education - and upgrading polytechnics to suit! FYI, Effort goes hand-in-hand with attainment. And in my experience, EMA is given to college students and so forth with no work ethic anyway - they just want the "incentive" (i.e. money)
    I agree with you that the target of getting 50% of the population into higher education is stupid, but EMA doesn't just cover those on A-levels; they could be in college doing a vocational course like an NVQ or a BTEC. Again, what you're saying is a huge generalisation and the majority of people I know on EMA, including myself, work hard at school/college.

    (Original post by phillipsm)
    EMA is not meant to fund your university education. Therefore, it should be spent solely on your sixth form career - not least because poorer students are entitled to the full student loan, travel grants, HE grants, university bursaries and so forth. In other words, their university education is just about paid for them anyway. How is that fair? The vast majority of "middle class, rich" students leave university in debt and have to pay it back without parental help - why is that ok?
    Because otherwise they wouldn't even consider going to university, knowing full well that they wouldn't be able to afford it. A few years ago, I wouldn't have thought I'd be able to afford to go to uni either, but now I know I'll get some help. Why should intelligent young people who want to make something of themselves be denied the chance to do so simply because they're not rich? Even students who get some form of financial help leave uni with debt and have to pay it back.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    EMA really is a waste, and the millions of pounds spent funding it really should be used to further subsidise universities. The £30 a week I get from it is frankly pointless, as I rarely spend it for my education, and I very much doubt that any one does really require it for sixth form. Anyway, if you're really smart enough (i.e. A grades) you should realise that a small investment now will reap rewards later in life.

    Abolish it, I say.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I didnt realise that so many people were against EMA. I'm not going to say that it doesnt have its problems - but I didnt think there would be so much negativity about it!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepgirl)
    I didnt realise that so many people were against EMA. I'm not going to say that it doesnt have its problems - but I didnt think there would be so much negativity about it!
    Mostly from people who don't get it and are bitter...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm eligible for EMA. Anyone know what date you gotta hand in the form by?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Rolldeep, do it ASAP...
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    At my school there would be no chance of getting the register. They are all done in biro anyway. I suggested linking pay to achieving realistic targets which is different from linking to performance...
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by leannemann)
    At my school there would be no chance of getting the register. They are all done in biro anyway
    At my school, they're all done on the teachers' laptops now, except when the system breaks down, which it does a lot, and then they're done on a piece of paper that the teacher tends to keep with them. We do have people getting registered in the morning and then buggering off home, but I'm not sure if they look at registers taken in lessons as well.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    A friend has his registers done by computer, he says they're really unreliable. the problem in my school is that skiving doesn't happen very often in the teachers eyes, but it's quite easy to do as they can be too trustworthy to people who suck up to them. I hate people who suck up to teachers...that was random!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by phillipsm)
    Does that show the calibre of some EMA students?
    LOL! Absolutley :rolleyes:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I would have got ema, the whole £30 if it had been introduced in my school when i started year 12. As a year 13 student I have watched the year 12s join sixth form, at least half wouldn't have without ema, and one person i know has target grades of Us, (worked out from gsces) so, as long as he keeps failing as his is, he'll be reaching his target and getting the bonus money for doing so. An awful lot of them cannot be ****ed and really are only there for the money, the average grades from the january modules were down loads beause it used to be people who were academic and/or hard working who stayed on, now it seems that everyone does. I can understand why, school is wicked for the social side and you're getting paid too. But I really disagree with ema. Of course, had i got it myself i would've been able to give up my job and have more to time to work for good grades, so then i might have had a different point of view.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by seaspray)
    EMA is such a rediculous, unfair, waste-of-tax-payers-money scheme with no significantly positive outcomes. :mad:

    I am furious at the whole system.
    What an absolutely pathetic statement, EMA has rightly been established to provide that incentive to people from lower income families to enter higher education. These people may otherwise feel pressured to go and enter the workforce due to money constraints. How can this possibly be a bad thing?? It is good for our economy in terms that the British economy in the 21st century needs skilled workers. After people have received their a-levels they may feel they wish to go university. This is fantastic as people may go to university who may never have considered it previously. Someone noted that people who receive EMA are in fact "layabouts" I find this a ridiculous and frankly snobbish view; inherent in any benefit they will be people who take advantage of it, but is this reason for aboloshing the welfare state in its entirity? Of course not. My family's income is just over the threshold but I am not resentful, because I've seen the benefits it has brought others. Not least some of my friends who may not have considered going to college if it wasn't for EMA. So before you criticise it, just stop and think it through.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well I couldn't be bothered reading every post but I think I read enough. I suppose EMA is possibly a good idea, even though the criteria for getting it is flawed.

    I do not get it, I earn my £30 a week through working, my parents give me sweet fa in 'pocket money' no I don't have a swimming pool and my parents drive neither bentleys or mercs although wouldn't we look odd on our street if they did! It's a stupid assumption that if your parents earn over £30k you're going to be 'given' money by them. I work for everything I have, hence why I value work so much. I have a strong work ethic, most likely stronger than many on EMA (yes I know it's a generalisation). The only reward I get for doing well in my exams is 'well done' lol. It would be great to get EMA I would have the option of whether or not I wanted to work. BTW I'm not a snob but if you have two parents living together is it really that hard not to earn £15k each? Also after paying for mortgage, bills, living costs etc. my parents have little disposable income, I can't say that their lifestyles are all that different from those earning less than £30k (In a lot of cases but not all).

    No financial incentive to stay on at college and no financial help towards it, yet I still managed it, I'm sure everybody else could too, and yes I take the bus to college!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I dnt get ema even though i am eligable but i was a year ot of it, my parents give me virtually no money whatsoever and i work 28 hours a week. my friend who doesnt work or wants to work gets £30 a week spends it on games and dvd's. he wanted an slr camera but stole the school's one and he only staying in school for the ema. all his family dnt work plus have never worked ever in their lives. They get way more than 20k a year on benefits. i think they should spend the ema money elsewhere on the nhs where its needed the most! i hate most ema ppl in my school they dnt deserve it and they wont get any better grades because of it. 10% of ppl who get ema use it generally for school equipment etc the rest funds antisocial behaviour thru drugs and alcohol
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lawrence4)
    my parents give me sweet fa in 'pocket money' no I don't have a swimming pool and my parents drive neither bentleys or mercs although wouldn't we look odd on our street if they did! It's a stupid assumption that if your parents earn over £30k you're going to be 'given' money by them.
    Nobody is assuming any such thing. Lots of people are completely missing the point - EMA is so that students have less of a financial burden on their parents.

    In a low income household, you're more likely to be pressured into going to work instead of staying on at school - because you're parent(s) can't afford to pay for your expenses for an extra 2 years.

    EMA allows students to have less of a financial burden on their parents - it doesn't matter what the money is spent on. Sure, it may be spent on alcohol and the like, but if the money wasn't given to the student through EMA it would just end up coming from the parent(s) who can't afford it.
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

1,550

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 22 Aug '18
  3. University of Buckingham
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.