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    When should this be used and why?
    Can't the flemings left hand rule do the job...

    thanks.
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    To find the direction of the field on a current carrying wire.
    The field produced will be radial, since the wire is spherical, so we can use the right grip rule to find the direction of this field.
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    Nice1
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    left hand rule is how the field will cause a moving charge to experience a force, right hand rule is how a moving charge will cause a field, kind of opposites.
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    (Original post by SinghFello)
    To find the direction of the field on a current carrying wire.
    The field produced will be radial, since the wire is spherical, so we can use the right grip rule to find the direction of this field.
    you can also use the corkscrew rule for the same thing
    eg if a wire is goin into the page you follow it with a corkscrew - so to make a corkscrew go into the page you shoud turn it clockwise and so that is the direction of the mag field .you turn the CS anticlockwise to make it come back out of the page so when the current is comin out of the page the mag field lines are aniclockwise
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    Is it right to use flemings right hand rule for induction and flemings left hand rule for other situations such as a current carrying wire in a magnetic field

    ?
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    (Original post by SinghFello)
    To find the direction of the field on a current carrying wire.
    The field produced will be radial, since the wire is spherical, so we can use the right grip rule to find the direction of this field.
    also in a solenoid, if u curve ur fingers in the direction of the current, the thumb direction will indicate the direction of the B field within the coil.

    who would hav thought our hands were such useful instruments in studying physics?
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    Last year someone was using the left hand rule in an exam and got kicked out because the teacher thought he was communicating with fellow students.
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    (Original post by nas7232)
    Last year someone was using the left hand rule in an exam and got kicked out because the teacher thought he was communicating with fellow students.
    :rofl:
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    (Original post by nas7232)
    Last year someone was using the left hand rule in an exam and got kicked out because the teacher thought he was communicating with fellow students.

    I particularly enjoy displaying the left hand rule, especially when the current is facing upwards. teehee
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    ok now im actually confuzed. again. what goes on each finger for the right hand?
    left hand is current (middle finger), field lines first finger, motion is the thumb???
    right hand......?
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    left hand,

    First Finger(Field)
    seCond finger (Current)
    leaving thumb for Force(Fum-force!)

    I have forgot right hand as well :confused:
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    (Original post by marisad_uk)
    left hand,

    First Finger(Field)
    seCond finger (Current)
    leaving thumb for Force(Fum-force!)

    I have forgot right hand as well :confused:
    close yr right hand, with yr thumb pointing like this dudes hand :thumpdown
    now the thumb tells you the direction of current and the finger wrapping round yr palm is the direction of the mag field lines around the current carrying wire
    i think cockscrew rule is much easier :p:
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    OR do u mean this http://www.pa.msu.edu/courses/1997sp...thandrule.html
    :eek: never seen this before :eek: , i dont think its in edexcel sylabus or my teacher would have mentioned this
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    I just remember it as FFC, or like backwards alphabetically
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    (Original post by m0dm0)
    Is it right to use flemings right hand rule for induction and flemings left hand rule for other situations such as a current carrying wire in a magnetic field

    ?
    Is this Right?

    Thanks
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    Just to clarify a little:

    Flemming's hand's rules:

    First finger = direction of mangetic field (north to south)
    Second finger = direction of current (+ve to -ve - ie. pointing towards the -ve potential)
    Thumb = direction of force/movement

    These are the same for his Left AND Right hand rule

    There is another slightly different system using a clenched fist and an extended thumb, which sounds a little easier to use to be honest, but I'm not especially familiar with it. They describe exactly the same thing (see sumitk87's post).

    The left had rule is used for the motor effect (when you supply current and magnetic field) and the right hand rule is for the generator (supplying movement and mangetic field). I don't know about if you supply a current and motion and get a magnetic field - kept forgetting to ask our physics tutors about it. Too late now i guess - anyone else know?

    There y'go. That should clear anything up.
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    Also worth noting, that the "Current finger", is using in a circuit following convensional current only. If the particle is NEGATIVE, this finger will have to be mirror, so that its facing the opposite direction (just imagine it if you cant actually do it!).

    In PHY6, you have to use F=BQv alot, and the particle in question may be an electron, and the direction of its velocity will be found from this "modified" left hand rule. Commonly in question regarding cyclotrons.
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    just remember force thumb, magnetic field first finger, conventional current second finger

    FBI .. youll never forget that ever again.
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    (Original post by CrazyChemist)
    Just to clarify a little:

    Flemming's hand's rules:

    First finger = direction of mangetic field (north to south)
    Second finger = direction of current (+ve to -ve - ie. pointing towards the -ve potential)
    Thumb = direction of force/movement

    These are the same for his Left AND Right hand rule

    There is another slightly different system using a clenched fist and an extended thumb, which sounds a little easier to use to be honest, but I'm not especially familiar with it. They describe exactly the same thing (see sumitk87's post).
    If you're talking about the right hand grip- it tells you whether the field due to a current conducting wire is clockwise or anticlockwise, when given the direction of a conventional current. (or vice versa)

    It can also tell you the direction of the field inside a soleniod.
    I think it's known as the "corkscrew rule" because that's how you're supposed to picture it, but using your right hand in a grip as you described it is much easier.
 
 
 
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