Turn on thread page Beta

    Hi all, I am 15 years old and currently in between my sophomore and junior years of High School in
    the US (1 year ahead of my age group). My family will be moving to the UK soon and I would like to
    know how the system works there. (I am planning on attending university.) I have heard of GCSE,
    A-levels, and AS-levels, but I don't know what they are. Any advice? Thanks, Charlie

    Charlie,

    [q1]> I am 15 years old and currently in between my sophomore and junior years of High School in the US[/q1]
    [q1]> (1 year ahead of my age group). My family will be moving to the UK soon and I would like to know[/q1]
    [q1]> how the system works there. (I am planning on attending university.) I have heard of GCSE,[/q1]
    [q1]> A-levels, and AS-levels, but I don't know what they are. Any advice?[/q1]

    you could start here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio1/onelife/...on/index.shtml

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/education/default.stm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/edu...ms/default.stm

    You take GCSEs at 16, AS at 17, and A-levels at 18 (normally).

    Mind you, being a foreigner, you might not have to take GCSEs . I went straight to A-levels at 15
    (I'm a foreigner too). You'd have to make sure you're able to deal with GCSE stuff if you decide to
    skip GCSEs. Unis might not require GCSEs from you if you're a foreigner (the admissions tutors here
    would know better than me though).

    HTH a bit.

    M.

    "Martina" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    [q1]> Mind you, being a foreigner, you might not have to take GCSEs . I went straight to A-levels at 15[/q1]
    [q1]> (I'm a foreigner too). You'd have to make sure you're able to deal with GCSE stuff if you decide[/q1]
    [q1]> to skip GCSEs.[/q1]

    It's worth doing English Lang and Maths tho. Alot of jobs, if not Unis, stipulate them.

    Josh

    In article <[email protected]>, Josh Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>"Martina" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]>> Mind you, being a foreigner, you might not have to take GCSEs . I went straight to A-levels at 15[/q2]
    [q2]>> (I'm a foreigner too). You'd have to make sure you're able to deal with GCSE stuff if you decide[/q2]
    [q2]>> to skip GCSEs.[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>It's worth doing English Lang and Maths tho. Alot of jobs, if not Unis, stipulate them.[/q1]

    It depends a bit what roughly-equivalent qualifications you have from your US schooling.
    Universities in the UK won't necessarily expect foreigners to have GCSE (or A level, come to that),
    but they might want some evidence of competence in, say, maths or English if these are subjects you
    have not done at ha higher level. And so might employers, as Josj says.

    Compared with the US you will find that the English specialise more and earlier. For AS/A level you
    might well be doing only four subjects, which could be all sciences or all arts subjects, though
    many do mixtures. And at University you will typically be concentrating on one subject.

    It's been interesting in Cambridge having third-year MIT students over here on an exchange. Maths
    majors are amazed (and either horrified or delighted depending on temperament) to find they have no
    compulsory Humanities courses.

    Katy

    Btw, GCSEs and A-levels are not the only option: you might want to consider the International
    Baccalaureate (IB). There aren't as many IB schools in the UK as there are 'normal' schools
    following the British curriculum. I know about IB schools in London and Oxford at least though.

    M.

    "Martina" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Btw, GCSEs and A-levels are not the only option: you might want to[/q1]
    consider
    [q1]> the International Baccalaureate (IB). There aren't as many IB schools in[/q1]
    the
    [q1]> UK as there are 'normal' schools following the British curriculum. I know about IB schools in[/q1]
    [q1]> London and Oxford at least though.[/q1]

    There's also the EB (European Baccalaureate) which is similar to the IB in stipulating that you have
    to study one subject from each of the major academic divisions (native language, foreign language,
    maths, science, humanities) except that you study seven or eight (can't remember exactly) subjects
    instead of five.

    For those who prefer the broad American system, this may prove an easier transition.

    Both are accepted by British universities and many in Europe.

    Josh

    [q1]> There's also the EB (European Baccalaureate) which is similar to the IB in stipulating that you[/q1]
    [q1]> have to study one subject from each of the major academic divisions (native language, foreign[/q1]
    [q1]> language, maths, science, humanities) except that you study seven or eight (can't remember[/q1]
    [q1]> exactly) subjects instead of five.[/q1]

    I think in the IB you have to do 6 subjects + TOK (Theory Of Knowledge). You might be allowed to
    bend the rules a bit and do 2 sciences or 2 languages. A friend of mine did Chemistry, Business
    Studies, Maths, Russian, English and French. There isn't an exam for TOK but you can get a bonus
    point for it.

    M.
 
 
 

2,254

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.