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What do you think of Political Correctness? watch

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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    The Union Jack is a completely different flag, which is usually flown by vessels of the british fleet, so it isn't a question of what you 'prefer' it's a question of talking about the flag of the UK, which is the Union Flag, not the Union Jack.
    According to the Queen's website the names are interchangeable.

    http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page398.asp
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    The Union Jack is a completely different flagwhich is usually flown by vessels of the british fleet, so it isn't a question of what you 'prefer' it's a question of talking about the flag of the UK, which is the Union Flag, not the Union Jack.
    The Union Jack is a completely different flagwhich is usually flown by vessels of the british fleet
    Its the SAME flag, but when its flown from a ship its called officially called unon jack as opposed to union flag. But in modern times people tend to call it union jack, me included.
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    If people developed thicker skins, we wouldn't need to worry about being politically correct, and fewer people would be offended by words.
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    (Original post by psychic_satori)
    If people developed thicker skins, we wouldn't need to worry about being politically correct, and fewer people would be offended by words.
    You know that isn't going to happen. Emotional excitability is an inherited trait, or at least it can be inherited.
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    (Original post by psychic_satori)
    If people developed thicker skins, we wouldn't need to worry about being politically correct, and fewer people would be offended by words.
    Good point. Why is everybody so bloody offended at everything? They should stop being so gay IMO. Bunch of pussies.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Good point. Why is everybody so bloody offended at everything? They should stop being so gay IMO. Bunch of pussies.
    'Whatever happened to the British stiff-upper lip?'
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    (Original post by Will)
    'Whatever happened to the British stiff-upper lip?'
    It became a large flacid trembling bottom lip.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    It became a large flacid trembling bottom lip.
    :rofl:

    time for a visual representation, courtesy of the legend himself. shaun goater (ex man city)

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    we've done this in our english language course and im divided...anyone who knows the sapir whorf hypothesis knows that they say language influences thought, if people arent politically correct then they will reinforce a difference between gender, race etc. However, people have taken it 2 far and now over-use political correctness 2 make sure that they dont say anything wrong, e.g. refuse collector instead of dustbin man. To me that seems a bit silly and making a mountain out of a molehill. What do u guys think?
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    (Original post by technik)
    :rofl:

    time for a visual representation, courtesy of the legend himself. shaun goater (ex man city)

    Oh......**** me!! that's funny..... Is that a lip or a flotation devise?
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    (Original post by Will)
    You know that isn't going to happen. Emotional excitability is an inherited trait, or at least it can be inherited.
    Getting emotional over the connotations of terms is something that is relatively unique to the latter part of the 20th century, for the most part. It's not the emotional excitability that is the problem, but WHAT ruffles people's feathers.
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    (Original post by x-lolly-x)
    we've done this in our english language course and im divided...anyone who knows the sapir whorf hypothesis knows that they say language influences thought, if people arent politically correct then they will reinforce a difference between gender, race etc. However, people have taken it 2 far and now over-use political correctness 2 make sure that they dont say anything wrong, e.g. refuse collector instead of dustbin man. To me that seems a bit silly and making a mountain out of a molehill. What do u guys think?
    I took the same course (AQA?) and came to the conclusion that PCness is now required in certain areas because derogatory terms not only cause offence, but draw attention to a negative trait of a group and so encourage hatred or scorn of that group.

    Unfortunately, civil servants with nothing better to do are now extending PCness to areas where it isn't needed yet, and are in fact inflaming the situation. They are following the school of thought that claims that our mentality is determined by our language i.e. 'If we don't have any derogatory words for a group then we cannot feel animosity towards them.' This theory is quite flawed, because we always seem to be able to develop new words for new things, and now I'm rambling and I'm going to stop after 3 dots...
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    I can understand 'Political' correctness. ie its not accpetable and unprofessional for Tony Blair to turn around and use terms such as 'paddy' or 'murphy' 'frog'. All of which aren't particularly harmful, but of the same style as 'Paki'.

    So there is a need for PC in its true sense, on the political scene, but not on a personal scene. i have numerous friends from various cultural and national backgrounds and I entertain in friendly racial bantar with most of them. I call the irish idiots, I tell my 'Indian' friend to 'f*** off where he came from' knowing full well he was born 2 streets away. Obviously if a person doesn't enjoy this then I don't do it.

    I think the key is for all kinds of racial sexual abuse to be considered not on the content but on the intentions. The same with PC, if someone doesn't like being referred to as blind then don't call him/her that. Using PC on the true stage, political, ensures that no one is upset by the UnPC terms. If PC is used in day to day culture then it will not be long before PC terms like ethnic minority or partially sighted gain a stigma and connotations to words that they replace, 'Paki' and 'Blind' respectively
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    I believe that the world probably IS a better place now that people can't really be called 'spaks' to their face, or that black people can't be called 'boy' or 'negroid', but the PC movement has gone WAY too far... it's telling people what to think and it limits free speech. If i want to call it a blackboard a 'blackboard' I will, it's not a chalkboard as some teachers at my school seem to think... my calling it by its colour is purely descriptive and doesn't have any colonialist overtones.
    I would be interested to know what people think about different 'levels' of stereotyping and name calling... Callng someone a 'bloody paki' or a 'stupid wog' is seen as very wrong, but the Aussies calling us 'poofy poms' is fine, and us Brits talking about 'Paddy', 'Thick Yanks' and 'bloody Frogs', and thinking of Germans as 'ultra-efficient Nazis' is, generally speaking, socially acceptable at many levels.
    Why is this? Is it right?
    Is it that us and the Aussies can laugh at ourselves better? Is it to do with sport?
    Is it that the French are seen as strong, and not discriminated against (unlike Asians, Blacks and Gays, for example), and so can put up with it better?
    Is it because however much we laugh at the Frogs, or the Yanks, or the Aussies, they have it pretty good in our society?
    Just interested to see what people think on this topic.
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    (Original post by walshie)
    Heres a couple FYI:

    Disabled (not allowed anymore) - its now referred to as 'less abled'
    Speaking as someone involved in the disabled rights movement that is complete rubbish.

    There is still a debate within the disabled community between people who believe in the social model of disability who prefer the use of the term disabled people to refer to a persons status within society and impairment to refer to a persons impairments and those who believe in the medical model of disablility who prefer the use of the term people with disabilities.

    Also just a little FYI - VI (visually impaired) is DIFFERENT to blindness - VI refers to people with sight problems (often severe) but who are registered blind - they are not blind but they still have impaired vision. A blind person is still referred to as a blind person, a VI person is referred to as a VI person - it isn't a PC invention it's a word that describes the circumstance of a significant number of people.
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    (Original post by vivado)
    I agree. People who would call a mentally disabled person 'retarded' are the true retards as far as I'm concerned, and they apparently dominate the whole of this thread. To be honest, it's surprising to read most the posts here. Perhaps I live in a country which is far too racially harmonious with no racial conflicts and xenophobia I've no idea how much bigotry exists outside of it. I feel immensely fortunate that I've never come into contact with such obscene, obviously largely rightist (in the political sense of the term) individuals in my life either. Back in the sixties, many of those from the Commonwealth (e.g. Singapore and Malaysia) who had studied in Oxbridge on scholarships could still recall how - unlike the Labour party members - the Tories were the least sympathetic to nationalist movements and full of their usual ******** about the glory of the Queen and the Empire.
    Retarded wasn't always a solely offensive term. In fact, it still isn't.

    It did actually mean 'Slowed or delayed in development or progress, esp. because of mental retardation' and still does. That's not offensive. What is offensive is when people take the word and turn it into an insult as you just did ('true retards').

    Using it in a derogatory way is what creates nasty connotations and takes its original, fairly neutral, meaning away.

    Referring to someone who is actually mentally handicapped as 'retarded' isn't all that offensive or unusual. My friend, whose brother has such a problem, talks of him as 'retarded.' It sometimes shakes her up a little if someone uses the word '******' in the insult sense, but not when in reference to her brother.

    And what's this talk of 'largely rightist' and 'tories' -- some animosity there, then? Can I smell a hint of stereotyping and discriminatory generalisation?
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    (Original post by SaccerZD)
    I believe that the world probably IS a better place now that people can't really be called 'spaks' to their face, or that black people can't be called 'boy' or 'negroid', but the PC movement has gone WAY too far... it's telling people what to think and it limits free speech. If i want to call it a blackboard a 'blackboard' I will, it's not a chalkboard as some teachers at my school seem to think... my calling it by its colour is purely descriptive and doesn't have any colonialist overtones.
    I would be interested to know what people think about different 'levels' of stereotyping and name calling... Callng someone a 'bloody paki' or a 'stupid wog' is seen as very wrong, but the Aussies calling us 'poofy poms' is fine, and us Brits talking about 'Paddy', 'Thick Yanks' and 'bloody Frogs', and thinking of Germans as 'ultra-efficient Nazis' is, generally speaking, socially acceptable at many levels.
    Why is this? Is it right?
    Is it that us and the Aussies can laugh at ourselves better? Is it to do with sport?
    Is it that the French are seen as strong, and not discriminated against (unlike Asians, Blacks and Gays, for example), and so can put up with it better?
    Is it because however much we laugh at the Frogs, or the Yanks, or the Aussies, they have it pretty good in our society?
    Just interested to see what people think on this topic.
    That is interesting... however, a british migrant did take offence at the term 'pom' and wanted it classified as a swearword or some such ridiculous thing... bloody whingeing poms. :rolleyes: :p:
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    political correctness doesn't necessarily do anything.



    it's just polite.
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    (Original post by xBeLLax)
    political correctness doesn't necessarily do anything.



    it's just polite.
    Changing the name of christmas to winterfest in stoke, as to not "offend" the muslims, is not polite its rude.
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    (Original post by LC01)
    Changing the name of christmas to winterfest in stoke, as to not "offend" the muslims, is not polite its rude.
    a little OTT :rolleyes: , i was not referring to that kind of political correctness...
 
 
 
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