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    I want to teach Music in secondary schools....I was told that is a stupid idea and why would I want to do that?!

    That's all I want to do! Am I stupid?!
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    (Original post by sexysax)
    I want to teach Music in secondary schools....I was told that is a stupid idea and why would I want to do that?!

    That's all I want to do! Am I stupid?!
    :confused: Who told you that and why's it a stupid idea?
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    No you're not stupid... who said that. If that's what you want to do you do it.
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    No, your not mad. I think it would be great to have a music teacher who enjoys the subject and actually teaches you instead of saying "go play instruments"
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    People say that teaching in secondary schools isn't good and you get treated really badly! But I actually know what it's like because my school is terrible and I help teach music so I have experience in the not so nice schools.
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    If that's what you want you do, go do it. Don't listen to anybody that tells you otherwise.
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    I get told I'm mad for wanting to teach French in secondary schools, but I don't let that put me off, and nor should you. If it's what you really want to do, go for it!
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    I don't think people who want to teach are mad, I understand why people enjoy it, I just could never do it myself! Do what you want to do. The education system needs enthusiastic teachers!
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    (Original post by sexysax)
    I want to teach Music in secondary schools....I was told that is a stupid idea and why would I want to do that?!

    That's all I want to do! Am I stupid?!
    I taught French, IT, and KS3 English and Maths in Secondary Schools.

    Music is the hardest subject to teach at Secondary level at KS3, and (perhaps) the easiest at KS4.

    At KS3, you have the most appalling split of abilities in every class: at the top, kids with Grade 8 clarinet, and at the bottom kids who think quavers come in packets...

    ...At KS4, with a bit of luck, you get a group of 8 to 10 talented and motivated musicians. Wonderful!

    If you get a sixth form, the balance is tipped in the positive direction!

    Carousel! [Swings and roundabouts, that is...]

    Aitch
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    I want to teach as well. I don't care. Its how you teach that makes the difference. Some people should never be teachers others are bril. It sounds as if you will be one of those rare good ones
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    In my school the KS3 kids are a nightmare so I'm getting plenty of experience! KS4 aren't exactly talented musicians! No-one done any exams and no-one above grade 3 standard- most are prep test!

    And then there is me LOL!!!
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    It's a good thing. The country needs motivated, talented teachers. I would like to give it a go too, not sure how permanently though.
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    i heard quite alot of teachers end up in the mental hospital.. but if its ur passion, i say who cares what others think.
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    You should do what you love, but beware! Unless you get a popular and well-funded school, music and art tends to be hideously underbudgeted and ignored.


    ¬______¬ which is why there are so many of us tootling on recorders nowadays instead of knowing where the keys lie on a piano.
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    I can honestly say i never learnt anything frm mi music teacher. Just swung around on those swingy computer chairs. Then crashed into eachother and raced.Safe teacher though (when he turned up).
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    (Original post by Aitch)
    I taught French, IT, and KS3 English and Maths in Secondary Schools
    So Aitch, how did you find secondary teaching in terms of class control and the discipline issue?
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    So Aitch, how did you find secondary teaching in terms of class control and the discipline issue?
    It's tough when you first start. You have to accept what every teacher tells you: without control, you can't teach. You are in charge. Forget about kids liking you - they will only like you if you have control anyway.

    After a couple of years, when you've become part of the furniture, it all becomes easier. If you have taught a class well in Year 7, kept good order, and been professional about teaching, marking, assessment, etc., they will respond to you positively when you meet them further up the school.

    The good thing about teaching practice is that you can ignore the previous 2 paragraphs, try to be nice, screw it all up, and it doesn't matter, so long as it's not all so appalling that you fail!

    Aitch
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    (Original post by Aitch)
    It's tough when you first start. You have to accept what every teacher tells you: without control, you can't teach. You are in charge. Forget about kids liking you - they will only like you if you have control anyway.

    After a couple of years, when you've become part of the furniture, it all becomes easier. If you have taught a class well in Year 7, kept good order, and been professional about teaching, marking, assessment, etc., they will respond to you positively when you meet them further up the school.

    The good thing about teaching practice is that you can ignore the previous 2 paragraphs, try to be nice, screw it all up, and it doesn't matter, so long as it's not all so appalling that you fail!

    Aitch
    I'm ashamed! I forgot the most important thing!

    Enthusiasm! If you don't love what you're teaching, how do expect your students to love it?

    Communicate your love of your subject, even in the face of (real or assumed) apathy! Even teenagers admire people who have enthusiasm!

    Admit it! It's a waste of time trying to dampen the enthusiasm of someone who really loves their subject. You have to get involved...

    Aitch
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    (Original post by Aitch)
    It's tough when you first start. You have to accept what every teacher tells you: without control, you can't teach. You are in charge. Forget about kids liking you - they will only like you if you have control anyway.

    After a couple of years, when you've become part of the furniture, it all becomes easier. If you have taught a class well in Year 7, kept good order, and been professional about teaching, marking, assessment, etc., they will respond to you positively when you meet them further up the school.

    The good thing about teaching practice is that you can ignore the previous 2 paragraphs, try to be nice, screw it all up, and it doesn't matter, so long as it's not all so appalling that you fail!

    Aitch
    Definitely true. The trouble with some teachers is that they care too much about whether or not their students like them, and you can't do that, at least not to begin with. You have to let them know straight away that you're in control, and then once you've earnt their respect, you can start being nicer and a bit more relaxed. Students are like predators- they can sense nervousness and weakness, so you have to really act tough to cover that up. I've found that a lot of it is reputation as well- once you have a reputation as being a bit of a doss, you've got no chance, but if you're known as being quite strict, not many kids will try it on with you.
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    Well enthusiasm is definitely one thing I've got! My teachers are always saying I'm enthusiastic about music!!
 
 
 
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