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Gary
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#1
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#1
Two sentences:
1.Our student will be benefitted by his teaching
2.Our student will benefit by his teaching.

Why 2 is correct but not 1?

Please advice!
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Cybercypher
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"gary" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Two sentences:[/q1]
[q1]> 1.Our student will be benefitted by his teaching[/q1]
[q1]> 2.Our student will benefit by his teaching.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Why 2 is correct but not 1?[/q1]

English prefers active rather than passive sentences. #1 is passive and
#2 is active.

However, #2 should be "from his teaching", at least in American English, it should. And "student"
should probably be "students".

Another point is that #1 is ugly, awkward English, and the verb "benefitted" should be changed
to "helped".

#2 might even be better, depending upon the context, if it were to read
"His teaching will benefit our students".

--
Franke
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Kristina Lim
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"CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "gary" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > Two sentences:[/q2]
[q2]> > 1.Our student will be benefitted by his teaching[/q2]
[q2]> > 2.Our student will benefit by his teaching.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Why 2 is correct but not 1?[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> English prefers active rather than passive sentences. #1 is passive and[/q1]
[q1]> #2 is active.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> However, #2 should be "from his teaching", at least in American English, it should.[/q1]

I agree, but how would you explain the reason? Is it that "benefit" in #2 is intransitive (vs.
transitive in #1)?

[q1]> And "student" should probably be "students".[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Another point is that #1 is ugly, awkward English, and the verb "benefitted" should be changed to[/q1]
[q1]> "helped".[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Is #1 actually *incorrect* or just an ugly and awkward passive sentence?

[q1]> #2 might even be better, depending upon the context, if it were to read[/q1]
[q1]> "His teaching will benefit our students".[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Franke[/q1]
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Cybercypher
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#4
"Kristina Lim" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> "CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]>> "gary" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > Two sentences:[/q2]
[q2]>> > 1.Our student will be benefitted by his teaching[/q2]
[q2]>> > 2.Our student will benefit by his teaching.[/q2]
[q2]>> >[/q2]
[q2]>> > Why 2 is correct but not 1?[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> English prefers active rather than passive sentences. #1 is passive and #2 is active.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> However, #2 should be "from his teaching", at least in American English, it should.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I agree, but how would you explain the reason? Is it that "benefit" in #2 is intransitive (vs.[/q1]
[q1]> transitive in #1)?[/q1]

It's the idiom. We can benefit *from* something that is done for us and we can benefit *by* doing
something ourselves.

[q2]>> And "student" should probably be "students".[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Another point is that #1 is ugly, awkward English, and the verb "benefitted" should be changed to[/q2]
[q2]>> "helped".[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q1]> Is #1 actually *incorrect* or just an ugly and awkward passive sentence?[/q1]

I believe that a professor of linguistics pointed out yesterday in another NG that "to benefit"
cannot be passivized. Obviously, however, it can be passivized, but to no effect, because the active
form performs exactly the same function. The subject of the sentence, "our students" is the receiver
of the action of the active verb "(will) benefit" and the prepositional phrase "from his teaching"
acts in the same way as the agentive phrase in a passive, "by his teaching them". Or "Our students
will benefit by going to the zoo".

I agree with the linguistics prof that "to benefit" cannot be legitimately passivized and that #1 is
incorrect.

[q2]>> #2 might even be better, depending upon the context, if it were[/q2]
[q2]>> to read "His teaching will benefit our students".[/q2]

--
Franke
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