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    I'm predicted A for GCSE and am aiming for an A in GCSE Stats (no predicted grade).

    How would I find AS Maths? Is it hard? I would proabably do it to AS only. My maths teacher said today that we (top set stats revision class people) could probably get 80% on C1 and S1 as S1 is mainly GCSE Stats. That leaves C2 for the whole AS.

    Also, could someone explain the module things? Each paper is sat individually, right? With one in Jan I believe?

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Final_F)
    I'm predicted A for GCSE and am aiming for an A in GCSE Stats (no predicted grade).

    How would I find AS Maths? Is it hard? I would proabably do it to AS only. My maths teacher said today that we (top set stats revision class people) could probably get 80% on C1 and S1 as S1 is mainly GCSE Stats. That leaves C2 for the whole AS.

    Also, could someone explain the module things? Each paper is sat individually, right? With one in Jan I believe?

    Thanks.
    You'll find AS maths fine. It isn't hard, especially as it has been tweaked to make it easier as you effectively have one less module of content to cover over the full A-Level.
    I'm not an expert on the new syllabus but for the AS year i'd expect you'd sit C1 in January and S1+C2 in the summer.
    I'd urge you to do the full A-Level though, it doesn't start to get interesting until things like integration via parts/substitution and 3d vectors.
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    C1 is a piece of piss. C2 is mainly easy with a few harder topics, such as logs, which take a while to get your head around, but after that are pretty straightforward. I've heard S1 is very easy, while M1 and M2 are mainly the principles of GCSE physics, with harder calculations i.e. easy. For D1, I get a conflicting message about it either being stupidly hard or stupidly easy.
    Oh, you only have to do C1, C2 and one other module to get the AS. Papers are sat individually, but it's up to the school as to whether they enter you for any modules in jan or let you sit them all in the summer.
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    Any Grade A student at gcse is capable of at least 90/100 for c1, i got an A at gcse and am pissed off with how i did because i don't think i'll get more than 80 for it, with no silly mistakes it's a gimme high A.
    s1 i've heard is very easy, not done it this year myself but is generally considered the easiest applied module.
    m1 isn't that easy in my opinion but it's not impossibly difficult, with a good teacher and work an A grade gcse student should be looking for a B at worst here.
    c2 i found quite difficult through the year but with practice at questions and knowing how to apply all the formulae it's not overly difficult, again i'm annoyed at how badly this went but i still feel i'll get about 60-70/100 for it.

    If you're capable of A at gcse and have motivation to work you'll be fine.
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    having done upto s3, stats definately gets easier. What I mean is that in my opinion S3 is the easiest, then s1 then s2.

    Stats is easy if you are interested in it...for me..I'm fed up of it...it's waaay too boring..plus most of it is memorising..especially s2 and s3. That's my early warning. S1 is quite easy but initially it takes time getting your head around some new stuff like normal distribution calculations etc. I did p1 to p3, p1 was pretty simple but can be tricky if u don't pay much attention in lessons. I guess maths should be easier now that they've got rid of p2 and replaced it with c2 which has fewer topics and less darn trig!

    Basically, the key to an A in a level maths is to be thorough with the main concepts and loads and loads of practice, cos the theory is quite simple to get to terms with but questions r vast.
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    What does c stand for? In my college for AS you have to do P1 P2 and S1 I think..
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    Anyone doing Further Maths? Is it mch harder than normal Maths?
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    (Original post by stratomaster)
    What does c stand for? In my college for AS you have to do P1 P2 and S1 I think..
    P=Pure....C=Core.....dont know why they changed though..but p's stopped and you can only do them this year if your resitting
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    I got an A in Maths and an A in Stats at GCSE and im doing Maths at the moment, S1 is really easy, the AS stats paper i did last week was very easy, people will of got 100%. C1 is easy and C2 is harder but not too bad, though this year the C2 paper was horrible
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    (Original post by Piggy)
    Anyone doing Further Maths? Is it mch harder than normal Maths?
    Depends, Its not really all the much harder, theres just more of it, but it depends on the type of person. If you think logically and work things out to some extent... and/or you work well with maths, chances are Further Maths could be a good idea, if you get your head around all the maths, it makes the normal Maths very easy to do, as you do everything twice Although if you struggle understanding alot of maths concepts, I wouldn't recomend it, you need to know how to apply things you have been taught previously all the time... without always being prompted.

    I personnally love Further Maths, Further Maths is alot more interesting than Maths and you start to learn some different things... for example, one thing that comes up in Further maths and not Maths is things like Complex numbers... the whole idea that the squareroot of -1 is i... things liek that are pretty fun to mess with :P

    The other advantage of FM, is that you usually find few people do it and so you have smaller classes... which is really nice (unless you havent done your hwk :P ) because you generally have better discussions and more one-one teaching, so if you get something wrong, it can be cleared up sooner. :P

    Whatever you guys go for, gl with it

    ~ Current Further Maths A2 student
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    (Original post by stratomaster)
    What does c stand for? In my college for AS you have to do P1 P2 and S1 I think..
    To clear this whoel thing up fully, there used to be 6 pure modules, 3 of which you'd take if you did Maths (P1, P2, P3) and 3 for further maths (P4, P5, P6)

    As of this year, they decided to expand the first 3 into four, to make A level maths easier to do and appeal to more people, so affectively, you have to do one less applied.. a whole 1/6 less work!

    Since there were four, they were renamed Cores, (C1, C2, C3, C4) and the correstponding P4 P5 P6 in the further maths wer renamed Further Pure (FP1 FP2 and FP3)

    Because of the balence of pures to applieds, you only ned to do either FP2 OR FP3 now for the further maths A level
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    Well.. i got an A in GCSE Maths and also in GCSE Maths and I'm getting (well hope :P) an A in Alevel Maths!!! :P You have to work hard... but I think it's not a difficult Alevel and ... well If you like doing numbers and you studying humanities subjects like History... I'd definetly recommend it to you!
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    [QUOTE=Chris.]Any Grade A student at gcse is capable of at least 90/100 for c1[QUOTE]

    Not really... half of my previous school and my current school people who did AS Maths... who got A at GCSE.... got D/E/U at ASlevel
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    (Original post by Feria)
    To clear this whoel thing up fully, there used to be 6 pure modules, 3 of which you'd take if you did Maths (P1, P2, P3) and 3 for further maths (P4, P5, P6)
    What exam board was this? I do AQA Pure maths & stats and we did P1, P2, P4 and P5. Plus S1 and S4 (easiest of the lot).

    I got an A at gcse maths (did at the end of the year 10) and stats but found AS level incredibly hard at the start. But if you put the effort in when you need it, things begin to flow quite naturally and it becomes a lot easier. That's what I found anyway. Plus the way we do our modules at college, we did P1/P2/S1 at the end of year 12. Then S4 and P4 in January of the 2nd year so I've only got one maths paper left (P5) and I only need about 50% to get an A overall. It's quite good that way
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    This was for Edexcel, I should have specified, sorry ^^;
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    maths AS level is difficult to understand initially, but when you look over it later on you find that you suddenly understand it. the jump between GCSE and AS is initially large, but when you get into the swing of it's absolutley fine
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    [QUOTE=kitsune][QUOTE=Chris.]Any Grade A student at gcse is capable of at least 90/100 for c1

    Not really... half of my previous school and my current school people who did AS Maths... who got A at GCSE.... got D/E/U at ASlevel
    Ive found most of these people, which are the majority at my centre, do not appriciate how much work is needed to do well in Alevel maths. Its very time consuming for those who dont have a natural ability, and only do as much work as is required for a less taxing subject usually find they get D/E's or fail miserably. Nothing to do with ability(to a certain extent), mainly just dedication.
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    I've just finished AS Further Maths, which with the module system is the same as an A level in single maths. Modules I've done are C1, C2, C3, C4, M1, M2, and S1 (OCR)

    For C1, anyone straight out of GCSE should get about 75%; 90-100% is easily obtainable by learning the basics of differentiation.

    For C2, the story is fairly similar, except with a teeny bit of integration, and some logs. Understanding the concept of logs are probably the hardest part C2.

    In C3 it starts to get hard; memorising the double angle formulas is a necessity (there are loads of rearrangements of cos(2x)), as is having a good grasp of both kinds of calculus.

    C4 continues this trend. Differential equations are actually quite easy once you grasp the concept at this level, since they only set very simple ones. However, the same cannot be said of vectors, where some quite difficult questions can be asked. The main problem with this one is time. Practice doing papers until you get fast enough (i.e. you have time to check your answers at the end).

    M1 is pretty easy once you've done C1 and C2. A bit of resolving, occasionly a bit of calculus, and you're done.

    M2 can actually be quite hard; some of the centre of mass stuff requires a bit of thought. Remember, however, that a lot of the common formulae of CoMs (and circular motion) are in the formula book. For projectiles, the only advice I can give is *don't* try and learn all the big equations (you know, the general cartesian equation of a projectile, formulae for range, height reached, etc.). Instead, do everything from first principles: start with the velocities in each direction (u cos α ; u sin α - gt) and apply whatever you need to depending on the question (suvat equations, integration for distance, whatever).

    S1 is pretty easy. Absolutely everything is in the formula book, so you don't really need to learn anything. Regression lines, for example, might actually need some thought, were it not for the fact that the entire process is spelled out for you in in formula book.

    Next year we're going to do the other 8 modules (FP's, M's, S's) so we do 15 in total, so even if you fail three modules you can still get top marks.

    For some reason, we don't do D modules. The teachers are all very derisory of them in a kind of general, non-specific way ("What do you mean, why aren't we doing the D modules? They're... They're D modules! They're trivial! Don't be ridiculous.") Anyone else encountered that sort of thing?

    It's starts to get really fun in the FP's, where you start looking at proper mathematical proof, and encounter some really fascinating stuff like complex numbers and the special case of Eulers identity when x=π.

    So, in conclusion: do maths! If you can, do further maths!
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    (Original post by simxp)
    So, in conclusion: do maths! If you can, do further maths!
    Seconded! Plus Maths gets you everywhere... whether you go into Architecture or Science or Medicene or Psychology... Maths is always liked
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    The best decision anyone can make at A level is to do Further Maths.

    It is definately the best of the subjects that I chose. (maths/further/bio/chem/phy)
 
 
 
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