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    that sounds dead accurate. but i wouldnt even know where to start...any suggestions as to what could say . i really am rubbish! could have something to do with importance of education, espec because was only availble to upper class in victorian times?poss. thanks xx
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    has anyone got any ideas for another novel which can be discussed on the topic of ignorance/education/possible example?
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    I've prepared items 1 and 2 quite well I think/ hope . But I'm not really sure how we are meant to prepare Item 3 How is it going to be used in the exam? should we look for how it is relevant to Nicholas Nickleby or the points it makes about literature in general? Any advice would be nice (ooh i'm a poet :p: )
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    Can someone help me with ideas on the structure/form of the Dickens extract, I'm finding that part icky...
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    I am so scared i really hate the synoptic we have done a few practice tasks and i don't do that good. I got told off for going on about feminism when we looked at Who's afraid of Virginia Wolf. I was positive that was the theme i'm afraid that i'll do something daft like that in the exam. How do i work out what i need to get in this exam to get the grade i want? And does anyone agree the theme might be based on the innocence of children, i was thinking Blake might be used but so many people have done it in class.

    Good luck everyone !
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    I was thinking of using Blake as comparison material, also Jane Eyre, and there's a good scene in Hard Times where Gradgrind teaches with relation to a horse/contrast with Squeers...
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    Anyone got any ideas about what could be relevant from Extract A of Item two. I have ideas for the others but this just puzzles me, can't even ask friends tomorrow before the exam as I'm doing it in the morning!! Arrrggghh...
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    [well good luck. what have you thought about extract B AND C i am lost!!!??xxx
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    what is diagetic and mimetic?and what is the listing technique i cant see anything in para 3?sorry if a bit dim...ding!!!thankis if u can help that would be great!xxx
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    The listing is when NN looks around at the boys and lists lots of descriptions about them - using mimetic (realistic) language


    About my teacher - I thought it was against the rules too but if she's willing to give my class some pointers then I'm not complaining I suppose. Her help didn't help last time anyway!!
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    someone said earlier "diagetic and mimetic language are combined to emphasise humour" but in dictionary diagetic doesnt exist!!!any idea on the spelling mistake?got ideas on item 2, ive got none, for any of them!quick summary!xxxxxxxx
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    We were told that mimetic refers to dialogue and diagetic is descriptive language. They are essentially vague terms but Jean Evans seemed to like them. What I meant by that comment was that if the piece were drama/poetry then the cumulative effects of the dialogue and the description would have been lost.

    By the listing technique I meant the way in which he uses long drawn out sentences which build tension.

    I was hoping when I originally posted that, that people would add their own comments to it. Has anyone else got any Dickens language/structure points?
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    first of all, i'm fairly certain it's spelled 'diegetic'.

    good representations of the diegetic/mimetic approaches can be found in Shakespeare. for instance, sometimes he says something directly in the stage directions ("exits stage left"); that would be diegetic. the other approach is making it so that a reader infers what is happening, i.e. mimetic.

    if there's a conversation going on between two characters, and one of them goes, "my, what a lovely day. the flowers are all in bloom...", that would be a mimetic approach to telling the reader that it's Spring.

    that should make things a bit clearer...

    what i'm still confused on, however, is just hos people can spend so much time annotating and reader over this pre-release. what the hell are you guys writing down/noting? am i missing something? pray tell what i should be doing... i'd like to get a decent grade on this one, if possible!

    cheers.
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    First it is against the rules of the exam board for the english teachers to discuss the paper with students. In fact I haven't seen my synoptic paper teacher in over two weeks. Our class got together and discussed the paper.

    Secondly and I quote from the exam board:

    "Well prepared candidates are those who have confidence in their own judgements and who know that what they have been studying for two years is not particular texts such as Wuthering Heights, Songs of Innocence and Experience or Death of a Salesman, but how to analyse the novel, how to analyse poetry and how to analyse drama. This understanding does not require great ability.
    Weaker candidates who have been taught to have respect for their own views and those of their peers and who know that the emphasis is on transferable skills, can make very creditable responses."

    Basically their not asking for a rehash of other peoples' opinions they want yours. They want to hear how you respond to it. Yes you can juxtapose anothers' view, you show comprehension then but you don't need a lot.

    Again I quote the exam board:

    "The answer is that candidates do not need to know anything specifically about particular viewpoints or literary theory. Clearly the more they know and understand the better, but each centre will have its own approach to what to teach in relation to critical viewpoints and literary theory. Lack of confidence about this was highlighted by the approach of some candidates to the June 2003 paper, where the main literary text was A History of the World in 10 ½ Chapters. Students who had prior knowledge about postmodernism, as they would have if they had studied The Handmaid’s Tale for instance, often recognised the novel for what it was and wrote accordingly. Students who were well versed in the skills embodied in the assessment objectives and had not undertaken unnecessary research, analysed it on that basis and wrote accordingly. The ones who really suffered were those who did some research, discovered that the novel was postmodern, leapt to the conclusion that they could not answer the questions without a knowledge of postmodernism and tried to get to grips with it in a few days. The results were predictably disastrous. Candidates who have been taught the skills embodied in the assessment objectives will be able to deal with any material they are given for this module and do not need to worry about last minute research of this kind."

    So be calm dear people. Be calm.

    Anyway of the random tangent. And onto another random note. I pray Duffy will not be on the exam. Although I seriously doubt she would be since 'Close' has already appeared; I don't want her to appear since I spent a term studying her for my coursework module. Blah!
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    (Original post by clockworkapples)
    Btw Ive been reading over some of the posts on here and it does amaze me how little we really need to get to get the grades. For example in law i only need another 119 marks out of a possible 210 to get an A!! So in fact if I got full marks in Wednesdays synoptic then I didn't need to bother showing up to the exam today! In English I need 208 out of 300. It just seems crazy. I thought it was my maths that was off but clearly not.
    Yeah, that's true! I need exactly 100 ums/210 for English, which obv does give me a generous margin for error...but I'm not counting on anything lol.
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    I feel as though I have prepared the extracts and Item Three to the furthest I can. Literally, I have just analysed what exactly their arguments are in Item Two, how they relate to Item One and tried to find some examples from Item One that illustrate some of the arguments presented in Item Two.
    Then basically just tried to assess how far Item Two has informed my reading of the Nickelby extract.

    How have others gone about preparing Item Two??
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    ^^^ I really haven't done anything major for any of them - I've looked at the use of comedy/satire and the influence on the extract/message Dickens was trying to send out for Item 2, for example, and linked it to the other extracts but nothing major.
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    what kind of ideas have you got?im so not understanding importance of item 3, could you help????msg etc i dont get it. xxx
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    I think Item 3's all about context. She says about reading the novel as a child, with subjectivity, not having a clue about the nineteenth-century context – but still feeling the injustice. Maybe there'll be a question about how important context is to studying a novel?
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    Or maybe Item 3 could be to do with class - in the criticism it mentions that Dickens was middle class, the kids in NN are 'young noblemen' - and Penelope Lively on her 'pansy strewn sofa' is clearly rich. Or maybe not? Who knows, we will find out this afternoon!
 
 
 
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