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    Here are some useful links for you guys.

    http://www.rafcareers.com - raf careers information

    http://www.raf.mod.uk - raf main site

    http://www.mod.uk - mod main site

    http://www.army.mod.uk - army main site

    http://www.army.mod.uk/careers - army careers information

    http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/ - royal navy main site

    http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/static/pages/2982.html - RN careers information

    http://www.mod.uk/issues/pay/index.htm - pay figures

    http://www.mod.uk/issues/women_af.htm - women in the armed forces
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    http://www.ta.mod.uk/ is useful as well
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    http://www.mod.uk/issues/equal_opportunities/index.htm (Equal Opportunities)

    http://www.mod.uk/issues/homosexuality/index.htm (Homosexuality in the Armed Forces)

    http://www.operations.mod.uk/ (Military Operations)

    http://www.aircadets.org (Air Training Corps)

    http://www.sea-cadets.org (Sea Cadets)

    http://www.armycadets.com (Army Cadets)
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    www.welbeck.ac.uk - Website for "Welbeck the Defence Sixth Form College"
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    http://www.nato.int

    http://www.un.org
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    The links below all give useful info regarding stats, formation, equipment etc. Not too sure how up to date the site is, but well worth a look.

    http://www.armedforces.co.uk/navyindex.htm
    http://www.armedforces.co.uk/armyindex.htm
    http://www.armedforces.co.uk/rafindex.htm
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    http://www.officerqualities.mod.uk/

    Mainly aimed at Army and TA applicants but might also be helpful to RAF, NAVY, Marines and any reserve forces applicants.
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    http://www.nato.int/docu/pub-form.htm

    Really good site. I ordered some publications from there the other week, they arrived on Thursday. Some top notch info on NATO!
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    (Original post by M!ke)
    http://www.nato.int/docu/pub-form.htm

    Really good site. I ordered some publications from there the other week, they arrived on Thursday. Some top notch info on NATO!
    Indeed.
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    My link, it is spreading, it has done well
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    www.wikipedia.co.uk
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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main...8&targetRule=0

    This is amazing for current affairs and history.
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    Some other well known forums:

    Proffessional Pilots Rumour Network http://www.pprune.org/forums/

    Military Fitness and Training http://www.mfat.co.uk/forums/index.p...529dc41f7ace41

    Air Cadet Central http://www.aircadetcentral.net/forums/index.php

    The Unofficial RAF Rumour Network http://www.e-goat.co.uk/forums/index.php

    British Army Rumour Service http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums.html
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    Just wanted to say i've been having a look around the rumour service boards and they're absolutely fantastic sources of information.

    Big shout out to Gemma
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    Thank-you
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    Here's the information from 'that NATO document'. Thought it'd be good to have it all in one place. I've found a copy of the entire pdf but it's too big to post as an attachment. Please remember that some of this is out of date, details of which parts can be found on the various threads.

    AIB
    (Original post by GemmaLS)
    This is taken from a NATO report written in 2001 http://www.pmfhk.cz/Katedry/RTO/TR-034/TR-034-$$ALL.pdf

    Candidates spend two full days at the Admiralty Interview Board . Other information is usually collected beforehand, including the head teacher’s and college principal’s report, tutor’s report and organised group activity reports. On arrival at the Board, candidates complete a Biographical Questionnaire Form. The aim of this form is to collect up-to-date and comprehensive information on the candidate. Much of the information will have been collected before, but circumstances and achievements may have changed. It is also useful for Board Members to have all the information together on one form, particularly when preparing for the interviews. In addition, certain items from the form are input to a computer to produce a biographical data score which is used at the final “Wash-up”.

    The psychometric test battery

    All the psychometric tests used at the AIB are paper and pencil tests designed to be administered to groups of candidates. The tests are in the form of multiple choice answers, with a computerized marking system used to compile the results. At present, this testing session takes some 2.5 hours, including giving instructions and collecting answer sheets.

    The current AIB battery consists of the following tests:
    • Verbal Reasoning
    • Non-Verbal Reasoning
    • Instructions
    • Mathematical Ability
    • Spatial Orientation

    The major aim of the battery is to give an indication of mental ability in relation to the demands of Officer training.

    (1) Verbal Reasoning: This is a 20 minute test consisting of four parts or sub-tests:
    • “Same and Opposite” uses synonyms and antonyms.
    • “Analogies”
    • “Jumbled Sentences”
    • “Completing Sentences”


    (2) Non-Verbal Reasoning: This is 13 minute test in two parts:
    • Matrix completion
    • Sequencing

    Tests of this type provide a measure of general intellectual ability that is less influenced by verbal aptitude and educational opportunities.

    (3) Instructions: The 15 minute instructions test requires the test-taker to perform various clerical type operations (checking, filing, classifying and coding printed information) in rapid rotation. Five operations have to be carried out on each item. The instructions are intended to be relatively complicated and hard to follow. Although designed as, and effective as, a measure of clerical ability, the test is also a good measure of general ability, and adds to the prediction of success which can be made on the basis of the reasoning test. This may be because the test demands concentration, efficient working methods and diligence in addition to intellectual ability in order to achieve a good score.

    (4) Mathematical Ability: This is a 25 minute test containing three sub-tests:
    • Facility: basic arithmetic and approximations
    • Problems: reasoning with algebra
    • Statistical interpretation using information form graphs and tables


    (5) Spatial Orientation: This is a 15 minute test with 15 items involving geographical directions and relative positions in space. In order to achieve a reliable and valid index of mental ability, a composite score is computed by adding the test scores together. Raw scores are converted to 0 to 9 scores for presentation to the Board. The Composite Test Score is the most valuable of the indicators derived form the written tests and is intended as a measure of general intellectual ability. As such, it would be expected to predict relative performance in a broad range of activities with intellectual content.

    Written Testing

    (1) Service Knowledge Test: This is a 10 minute test with 35 questions. Most of the questions in the test come from DNR: publications. There are different versions for the Royal Navy and Royal Marines.

    (2) General Knowledge Questionnaire: This lasts 10 minutes and has 35 questions which cover World Affairs, Science/Technology, and the Arts.

    (3) The Essay: Candidates are given a choice of four essay subjects. Subjects vary slightly between types of entry (e.g. Scholars versus Direct Graduates). They are told to write an essay covering no more than two sides on one of the subjects, with a time limit of 45 minutes. The aim of the essay is to obtain an indication of the candidate’s power of expression. Although all Board members see the Essay, the Headmaster has particular responsibility for marking it. He concentrates on overall construction (e.g. paragraphing), sentence construction, style, relevance of points and arguments, vocabulary, impact, legibility and spelling.

    (4) The Summary: Candidates have 20 minutes to summarize a passage of some 240 words in 90 words, preserving the key points, in good English.

    (5) Written Communication Skills Test: Unlike the tests discussed above this test is not used primarily to determine pass/fail but to identify literacy problems amongst suitable or marginally unsuitable candidates. Appropriate remedial action can then be taken. It is in two parts:
    • Formal Correction: spelling, punctuation, sentence structure and grammar (20 items, 10 minutes)
    • Summarizing and structuring (12 items, 18 minutes)


    (6) New Tests/ Procedures under development: During the development of new selection tests and /or selection procedures, it is often necessary to conduct trials of new tests or procedures

    The Gym Exercise

    Each task has eight minutes for completion. There are “wet” and “dry” tasks and every effort is made to ensure that they are of roughly equal difficulty. Each candidate in turn takes charge of the group. Each candidate is given 15 minutes to work out a solution to his or her problem. Candidates can make written notes but theses are collected at the end of the 15 minutes. Royal Marine candidates also have a leaderless task.

    The Group discussion

    Candidates are given a scenario to study for 15 minutes. They may make notes. A number of different scenarios are used. Candidates are told as a group that as a group they will have to propose aims and a plan for the problem that they will be given. They have 15 minutes to discuss the problem and five minutes to present them individually for two to three minutes each.

    The Interviews

    There are two interviews, one by the board and the other by the Personnel Selection Officer. Each interview normally lasts 30 minutes. The general aim of the interviews are to probe and add information to that already collected form other sources. The interview is also used to assess the candidate’s motivation for a Naval career (i.e. knowledge, interests, and aspirations). In the Board interview, the Headmaster discusses academic opportunities and achievements, extra-curricular activities at school and other non-physical spare time activities. The naval member of the board discusses physical spare time activities, employment record, and naval knowledge and interests (there is a Royal Marine officer on Royal Marine boards). The President of the board discusses awareness of current affairs and any other points requiring clarification.

    The Personnel Selection Officer interview is carried out in a slightly less formal atmosphere and is used to probe any areas that are better discussed one to one. The PSO has the particular responsibility for covering family and domestic circumstances but will also cover spare time activities and vocational interests as they relate to Service compatibility, as well as any contacts with drugs and police.

    The final assessment

    After the interviews, the Board hears from the Senior Rate any observations that they have on the candidates outside of the scheduled activities. The PSO reports the interview and gives the major numerical predictors such as the Composite Test Score. The Headmaster assesses the Essay and Summary, and makes assessments of academic achievements and /or future academic performance. Board Members then individually consider all the evidence. Board members give assessment under four headings: Effective Intellect, Leadership Potential, Character and Personality, and Service Motivation; in addition, Physique is assessed for Royal Marine candidates. Each board member rates the candidate and gives a Final Mark (on a 020 to 980 scale). The Final Marks are averaged to produce the Final Board Mark; each Board Member’s mark has equal weight. Final Board Marks of 500 or better receive a positive recommendation as Ministry of Defence (Navy) “passes”. In times of shortage, some “marginal failures” may have their names forwarded to the Ministery of Defence for consideration The Ministery of Defence makes the final selection.
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    RCB
    (Original post by GemmaLS)
    This is taken from a NATO report written in 2001 http://www.pmfhk.cz/Katedry/RTO/TR-034/TR-034-$$ALL.pdf

    Most officers are recruited by means of a complex network of school and university liaison officers. Their role is to act as a focal point for those interested in an Army career. School liaison officers, in particular, are proactive in identifying potential candidates and nurturing their interest. Generally speaking, officer candidate recruitment is centred around the individual Regiments and Corps. All Candidates attending the Regular Commissions Board (RCB) are usually sponsored by a Regiment or Corps. Those who cannot obtain Regimental support are still entitled to apply and can be sponsored directly by, for example, a university liaison officer.

    All candidates are entitled to two Regimental familiarisation visits. Here potential candidates are interviewed and often given short detachments with the regiment, which serves the purpose of providing a realistic job preview. The visit also gives the Regiments the opportunity to see potential candidates in an appropriate milieu. Candidates thought to be unsuitable might be discouraged but also might be to another Regiment or Corps that might be more suited to their interests. However, all candidates have a right to enter an application even if they cannot obtain a Regimental sponsorship. Regiments take a great interest in their candidates.

    Following a formal application the next stage is that all candidates must attend a RCB Briefing. The purpose of the Briefing is not primarily a selection process but is designed to familiarise all potential candidates with the type of activity they will encounter tat the RCB main board and thus create a level playing field for all candidates.

    The candidates undergo an interview, undertake physical fitness assessment in the form on an obstacle course and gain some experience of practical leadership exercises.

    During the RCB briefing, the Officer Intelligence Rating (OIR) Tests are administered. The OIR consists of three computer administered psychometric tests:
    • The ARCOM test, which is a more advanced version of the BARB soldier recruit tests. It is composed of 4 sub-tests and is designed as a measure of general (fluid) intelligence.
    • A numerical reasoning test designed to measure a candidate’s ability understand and draw inferences from numerical data presented in graphical and tabular form.
    • A verbal reasoning test designed to measure a candidate’s ability to comprehend and draw inferences from written information.

    Although the main purpose of the briefing is familiarisation, those candidates who fail to meet a minimum score on the OIR are eliminated from further consideration. Candidates are also graded on their potential likelihood of success at the main board. Some candidates are actively discouraged, others are counselled on potential weaknesses and are told to delay their application. However, candidates who meet the minimum OIR but are discouraged for some other reason still have the right to proceed to the main board.

    The next stage is attendance at the RCB main board. This is a three-day assessment centre based on the original WOSB concept. It is a common procedure for all officer candidates including in-Service candidates, although some professional groups, e.g. lawyers and doctors, take a shortened version.

    Day one consists of administrative briefings and written tests consisting of: general knowledge, Service knowledge, current affairs and a written essay.

    The second day consists of group activities and interview. The group activities consist of: outdoor tasks requiring co-ordinated physical effort and sense of urgency. These are leaderless tasks in that no one is nominated as leader. Three interviews are also conducted by the Vice-President (a Colonel), the Deputy board President (a Lt Col) and a senior education officer. Finally, candidates participate in group discussions

    Day 3 consists of group exercises:
    • The command task which is a group outdoor task where each candidate is appointed in turn as the leader. He or she must solve a problem, devise a plan and execute the plan by briefing and directing the team.
    • A planning project. Candidates are given a written problem, and candidates are required, individually, to undertake a written analysis and derive a plan. The second part of the exercise is a group discussion in which candidates are required to arrive at an agreed group solution to the problem. Finally candidates are individually questioned on aspects of their own plan, which often involves solving time/distance problems under time pressure.
    • An individual obstacle course is used to measure physical fitness.
    • A lecturette. The candidate has to prepare a five minute presentation on a topic of their own choice which must be presented to the group.

    All exercises are rated using Behavioural Anchored Rating Scales against a number dimensions.

    The final board consists of a discussion of the candidates and all assessments are reduced to a final selection rating of the candidate’s intellectual potential, practical and planning ability and personality and character.

    Successful candidates then proceed to a common officer training course at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst (RMAS). Some candidates, generally the younger ones, considered to possess rectifiable weaknesses can attend a variety of pre-RMAS preparatory courses.

    A pass is valid for a number of years. Some candidates can be offered university sponsorships and will first complete their university courses before taking up their training place. Other candidates may also attend university unsponsored before RMAS. Additionally, the Army has a sixth-form college (senior high school) where potential candidates for the technical arms can study for university entrance qualifications. Selection is via an analogous system to the main board and is also conducted by RCB staff. Successful pupils are guaranteed a place at Sandhurst and a full career regular commission.

    After Sandhurst, many are also offered in-house degree courses at the Royal Military College of Science, which is mainly a post-graduate institution offering specialist technical training courses for serving officers.
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    OASC
    (Original post by GemmaLS)
    This is taken from a NATO report written in 2001 http://www.pmfhk.cz/Katedry/RTO/TR-034/TR-034-$$ALL.pdf

    I know some things have changed since this report was written but I would prefer to leave the original text intact. Also I attended OASC in the middle of the changes so I wouldn't like to say what happens now. If anyone wants to correct anything, feel free:

    Practise of Officer Selection - RAF

    Applications.
    Applications for university sponsorship or entry into the Royal Air Force are passed to the Officer and Aircrew Selection Center (OASC) at RAF College, Cranwell from a number of sources such as Careers Information Offices, University Air Squadrons and Senior Careers Liaison Officers, or in the case of those already serving, via their station executive. Thus, most of those applying to be considered at OASC will already have been seen by other and, according to the nature of their application, will have received some advice on preparation for their attendance. The OASC processing staff make up the list of candidates to be called forward to the selection procedure.

    Attendance at OASC.
    The description of the Boarding processes outlined below is that followed by the majority of candidates and assumes success at each stage. Although this brief is written to reflect male candidates, the same procedures apply to females. Clearly, a candidate for aircrew who fails either aptitude or medical testing would not continue in the process unless he indicated, either by his application or on review, that he was prepared to consider other branch choices.

    The Part 1 Selection Procedure

    Aptitude Testing.
    A battery of aptitude tests is undertaken by all candidates. Some of the individual tests are known predictors for pilot, navigator, air traffic control and fighter control, while others, or combinations of others, are used to measure NCO aircrew aptitude and general level of intelligence. Candidates are engaged for up to five hours on the full aptitude testing battery.

    Medical Examinations
    All candidates, even if they are already serving, undergo a rigorous medical examination, involving a number of specialists, to determine their fitness for RAF service and their chosen branches. Those potential aircrew who are accepted after the full selection procedure are required to return to OASC to undergo extended aircrew medical testing.

    The Interview
    Candidates who pass aptitude and medical testing then move on to the final element of the Part 1 Selection Procedure. This is a comprehensive interview, conducted by a Wing Commander Board Chairman and a Squadron Leader Board Member, during which the candidate is questioned about his background, education, interests and activities, awareness of current and military affairs, and motivation towards an RAF career. The interviewing Board have at their disposal the current application form and supporting references, together with the assessments and results of any previous attendances, but, deliberately, they remain unaware of aptitude scores, medical results and vacancies so that these factors cannot colour their judgement of the candidates. The interview lasts for approximately 45 minutes while contemporaneous notes are taken and scores awarded by the non-speaking member of the Board. The candidate is assessed on a 1 – 9 scale, measuring personal qualities, under the following headings:
    • Appearance and Bearing
    • Manner
    • Speech and Powers of Expression
    • Activities and Interests
    • Academic Level/Potential
    • Physical Level/Potential
    • Awareness
    • Motivation
    • Overall Impact

    On completion of the interview, the Board discusses and arrives at a Board Grade (BG) which will reflect what they have seen, the marks they have awarded and the relative balance of perceived strengths and weaknesses. Suitable candidates will be passed on into Part 2 of the selection process (assuming that there have been no aptitude or medical problems). Marginal candidates may or may not move on to the next phase depending on the board recommendation made, aptitude scores if applicable, and the requirements for making up the syndicates for Part 2.

    The Part 2 Selection Procedure

    Those candidates who are recommended to go forward to Part 2 are grouped into syndicates of five or six, each of which is allocated to a Board. Syndicates are usually of mixed gender. Generally, candidates will be assessed by a boarding team different from that which interviewed them. The Board has at their disposal the candidate’s dossiers, which includes the Part 1 comments and recommendation, but they remain unaware of aptitude problems or medical factors.

    The Discussion Exercise.
    The first element of Part 2 is a 20-minute discussion exercise run by the Board Member. The syndicate members are given three or four general topics to discuss among themselves; the Board plays no part other than introducing the topics. The topics do not require any specialized knowledge, but all have a degree of controversy which, hopefully, will provoke lively and animated debate. During the discussion, the Board will assess such qualities as tolerance, maturity, originality, power of expression, sincerity and intellect. Finally, they award a percentage score to each candidate.

    The “Leaderless” Exercise.
    After Discussion, the Board Member takes the syndicate to the Exercise Hangar for an active exercise lasting for 30 minutes. The purpose of the exercise is twofold: firstly, the Board will be looking for early signs of group compatibility, co-operation, physical characteristics, practical perception, resourcefulness, etc; secondly, it introduces the candidate to the concept of working as a team and acquaints them with the basic rules for subsequent hangar exercises. A percentage score is awarded by the Board to reflect the level of involvement of each candidate and the personal qualities revealed. At the end of the exercise the Board Chairman spends about five minutes with the syndicate, reinforcing the need for a leader in such exercises and offering advice on the requirements for individual command situation section exercises later in the selection procedure.

    The Group Planning Exercise.
    Each syndicate member is given a copy of the exercise setting, rough working paper and a pencil. The setting, chosen from a number available, contains a map and brief of an imaginary situation in which the syndicate team finds itself. There are normally two or more possible solutions to the problem and the aim is for the syndicate to arrive at a group-preferred solution. The exercise is divided into three phases:

    (1) The Private Study Period.
    After briefing, the team is given 15 minutes for private study during which they acquaint themselves with the brief and setting, making whatever notes they wish and undertaking their own speed/distance/time calculations to arrive at one or more solutions.

    (2) The Discussion Period
    Next, a 20-minute period is given for the group to discuss the options, check calculations and arrive at a team solution. No chairman is appointed and discussion is on a free-for-all basis. During this phase, the Board, who take no active part in the discussion, will assess which members of the syndicate have influence, perception, comprehension and judgement and note is made of their degree of involvement, co-operation and numeracy.

    (3) The Question Period.
    There then follows a 20-25 minute phase during which the Board Chairman questions each member of the syndicate about the setting, the problem, the chosen solution, the rejected solutions and the calculations. By the end of the questioning, the Board Member, who will have been marking throughout this period, will have noted the qualities apparent in each syndicate member and, in addition to confirming or not those qualities already mentioned at sub-para b above, the additional qualities of mental agility, flexibility and reaction to pressure will have been assessed.

    At the end of the Planning exercise, the candidates are briefed on administrative matters and are given a written refresher on how to undertake time, speed and distance calculations in preparation for the next morning’s activity. Finally, they undertake a physical fitness test to assess their aerobic standard. The test is based on the Shuttle Test and is conducted under the supervision of Physical Training Instructors. While the syndicate is undertaking the fitness test, the Board has an informal discussion of their findings to date. They confirm the percentage marks to be awarded for the Group Planning exercise and then discuss the major strengths and weaknesses perceived in each candidate during the whole Exploratory Phase. A Board President, a Wing Commander with considerable experience of the selection process, observes each of the syndicates in turn and makes his own assessment of each candidate. After their own discussion, the Board debriefs the President on their findings and, where significant differences of opinion exist, explain their reasoning.

    The Individual Problem
    At the start of the final day, the candidates are briefed on the first exercise, the Individual Problem. This is similar in nature to the Group Planning exercise, and is selected from a number of options. On this occasion, as the title suggests, the candidate is on his own, and has 20 minutes in which to understand and assess the problem, undertake calculations and exercise judgement in deciding on the solution he wishes to present. At the end of the 20 minutes, he is questioned for 10 minutes by the Board Member on the problem, his solution, alternatives considered, and reasons for adopting one solution in preference to another.

    While the candidate is being questioned, the Board Chairman is engaged in assessing the level of performance, commenting on confidence, workrate, perception, judgement, comprehension and numeracy. As the Board Member then leads the candidate through possible alternatives, further assessment is based on receptiveness, flexibility, judgement, mental agility, composure, reaction to pressure, and decisiveness. At the end of the10 minute question period, the Board discusses the performance and awards a percentage score. This continues until each member of the syndicate has been seen.

    The Board President observes the performance of each candidate remotely by closed circuit television and makes his own judgement and assessments. Clearly, he is unable to observe each candidate’s performance in full, but he spends sufficient time on each candidate to form an opinion. Any major differences of opinion as to the qualities possessed by any candidate are discussed at the final debrief between the President and the Board Members.

    The Command Situation Exercise.
    A comprehensive briefing on the command situation exercise is followed by a return to the exercise hangar where each syndicate member will have the opportunity to lead an active exercise. Fifteen minutes are allowed for each exercise, selected from a range of 20. Each exercise involves moving both the team and equipment over a course, generally with bridging of some sort. Both Boarding Officers assess each exercise and note the key qualities which emerge; those sought include influence, assertiveness, drive, confidence, judgement, comprehension, decisiveness and flexibility. Further, they will also be looking at physical characteristics and reaction to pressure. The Boarding Officers consult on several occasions during the exercise, while ensuring safety and watching for infringements of the rules. As the 15 minutes comes to a close, a percentage score is agreed upon and the next exercise selected. This continues until each member of the syndicate has led an exercise.

    Post-Exercise Procedures

    At the end of the exercise phase, a debrief is conducted by the Board Chairman, covering the general administration and organization of the candidates’ stay at OASC. The candidates leave after this short debrief and the Board then discuss their findings from Part 2 of the procedure.

    The overall presence or absence of qualities are collated and a Part 2 BG is awarded. The Board will add any ‘credits’ due from the Part 1 interview, make any adjustments to take into account the Fitness Test result, and arrive at an Overall Board Grade and a recommendation on acceptance or otherwise. If the recommendation is not to accept the candidate, they also indicate what sort of encouragement or advice to give the candidate in respect of a future application.

    The Board then debriefs the Board President on their findings and recommendations. Where there is a divergence of opinion between Board Chairman and Member, it can be reflected but the Chairman decides the Overall Board Grade. Similarly, if the President has seen a candidate differently from the Board, he will reflect this in his final grade, taking precedence over the Board’s opinion. The Presidents in turn present their findings to the Deputy Director of Recruiting and Selection (OASC) and regular selection meetings are held to fill training courses.

    The Board Chairman and Member then write up an assessment of their candidates and, before passing the dossiers back to the President for his comment, they will also complete a report on the candidate’s strengths and weaknesses which will go back to the appropriate Careers Information Officer or RAF station for debriefing purposes.
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    Helpful stuff from PPRuNe: http://www.pprune.org/forums/showpos...71&postcount=1
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    Some of those MoD links don't work now BH, must have been changed when they re-did the MoD site.
 
 
 
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