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    I've literally just started my A2s & an advanced extension award has already been mentioned in both English Lit & English Lang.

    Firstly do you think these are designed to recognise the exceptional bright students or not?

    What subjects are they available in?

    What's involved if I opt for the Extension Award?
    - attend additional lessons?
    - extra topics?
    - harder questions based on the A2 syllabus?

    I am quite interested in these awards though realise that I'm not an exceptionally bright student but I can handle the workload. Is this a bad/good base for AEA?

    Any comments appreciated?
    Thank You x
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    AEA English is done by OCR, though the board isn't actually relevant for AEA. The link has a description of AEA and links to a specimin paper and specification (in pdf format)

    AEAs are designed to test the most able students (top 10% of the country) and involves doing one 3 hour written paper. You don't have to have extra tuition, its supposed to test your initiative and ability to think for yourself around the subject more than your ability to churn out facts. You don't even have to be doing an A-level in that subject to take AEA, although obviously it's recommended.

    Apparently only 50% of people who take AEAs actually pass. If you're one of them, you get Merit or Distinction, depending on how well you do.
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    They're designed for the top 10% of students in a particular A-level subject who are already very confident of an A. They're available in most subjects, but different exam boards offer different subjects, so you'll have to check their websites to find out. The theory behind them is that you don't need extra teaching because they're supposed to test how good you are at the subject as opposed to how much you've learnt and how well you've been taught, but depending on your school, you might have a few general discussion-based lessons to get you used to the style of questions. That means there won't really be any extra workload involved apart from sitting a 3 hour exam, but even if you don't think you're exceptionally bright, you have nothing to lose except 3 hours of your time. It's a completely separate qualification from A-levels, so you can fail the AEA (as about 50% of students do) but still get an A at A-level.
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    if you do pass the AEA, but mess up in one of your actual Alevels and don't get the exact grades you need for Uni, on results day, you can say to your uni, "ok i had a bad day on that exam, but i do have an AEA.. i'm a genius really, love me! :'( "

    esp if thats the subject u wanna do at uni.
    ..maybe
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    Although no extra tuition is needed Ive heard its a good idea to at least prctice it a bit as the questions are very different to the standard exam ones. Nothing too bad though.
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    Questions are different. Especially if the AEA is done by a different board (for instance WJEC do the Geography AEA; and it is largely environmental rather than mainstream geography that the main OCR, EdExcel and AQA boards do).
    Some extra work is needed.

    As someone said, they are designed for the top10% of students in the country; i.e. only those who are very confident of getting an A. If thats not the case, its probably a waste of time.

    You don't need one and it is unlikely to be a huge help; as few do them anyway and many unis are scepitcal of their current value; especially for the humanities which very few people do AEAs in and they are often not based on actual syllabus (rather aptittude content) in the humanities due to such differing syllabi.

    IMO AEAs are appropriate for those who have a real passion for a subject and are doing that particular subject at a Top Uni- particularly for Maths/Sciences. Indeed, for Sciences/Maths/Economics, Top Unis (i.e. oxbridge) have been known to offer AAA or AAB and distinction AEA in the subject you are going type offers.
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    i wrote down the fact that I would be taking the psychology AEA on my UCAS form, and now warwick included it in my conditional offer. :rolleyes: which means i no longer have the option of not taking it, which i was considering if i found it too hard or not worth the stress. so thats also something to bear in mind.

    It helps if the AEA is being offered by the same board as the one that does the A-level you're taking in the subject. for instance, I've heard that its pretty straightforward for AQA psych people to take the AEA, whereas it takes us edexcel people extra work/lessons/etc.
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    I've been told to do AEA Eng Lit and Eng Lang, too. Coincidences abound.

    I wouldn't say that I'm exeptionally bright either, but schools do have their reasons, and I doubt that they'd suggest it if they didn't think there was any chance of passing. They basically told me that it would just be a matter of doing a few practice papers and making sure that somebody told me a bit about what might be on there. Apparently its not really about what you've learned in the Lang and Lit syllabus but about your own personal something or other.

    If you think you can handle the extra pressure, then seriously think about going for it, particularly if English is your passion.
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    (Original post by Mata)
    I've been told to do AEA Eng Lit and Eng Lang, too. Coincidences abound.

    I wouldn't say that I'm exeptionally bright either, but schools do have their reasons, and I doubt that they'd suggest it if they didn't think there was any chance of passing. They basically told me that it would just be a matter of doing a few practice papers and making sure that somebody told me a bit about what might be on there. Apparently its not really about what you've learned in the Lang and Lit syllabus but about your own personal something or other.

    If you think you can handle the extra pressure, then seriously think about going for it, particularly if English is your passion.
    No offence to you, because I'm doing an AEA too and am not the most intelligent person in the school, but I think the schools probably put as many people in for it as they can afford/who they think have any remote chance of doing well because the more they get, the better it makes them look and there are often rogue results that people who aren't so intelligent based on grades will come out with a merit etc - theres always some strange results.
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    But doesn't it cost extra money to enter people for AEAs? They can't be free, so I don't think an institution would want to waste money on people who would be very unlikely to pass. My college doesn't even have a policy of doing AEAs; they just ask individuals occasionally (haven't heard anything myself so I doubt I'm being entered). It was a totally different case with my school during those pointless extension papers for English KS3 national curriculum tests. They entered about half the year group (and why not?), but only myself and one other girl "passed" it.
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    (Original post by Bubble Fairy)
    I've literally just started my A2s & an advanced extension award has already been mentioned in both English Lit & English Lang.

    Firstly do you think these are designed to recognise the exceptional bright students or not?

    What subjects are they available in?

    What's involved if I opt for the Extension Award?
    - attend additional lessons?
    - extra topics?
    - harder questions based on the A2 syllabus?

    I am quite interested in these awards though realise that I'm not an exceptionally bright student but I can handle the workload. Is this a bad/good base for AEA?

    Any comments appreciated?
    Thank You x
    If your taking the AEA, you won't be taking it in both English Literature and English Language - there is one paper that covers all the Englishes, including Communication Studies. The exam questions will be the same, you'll just opt for either a literary or linguistic approach. It's meant to be a pretty flexible paper.

    In terms of the workload - there is none, other than the exam itself. Some colleges may offer extra lessons, but theoretically you don't need it. However, time taken to look over the student guides and perhaps have a meeting or two with a teacher is probably quite useful.

    Wider reading plays a part in this exam, so enjoying and paying attention to what you do read is important. The questions are harder than A2, but in many ways they're more enjoyable because they let you explore what you want to.

    For me, at least, it isn't a part of my offer, but I have heard rumours that it might count in the future. However, it's something to otherwise enjoy . I'm taking mine on Thursday, so can't give any information other than that which I have gathered/been told about so far.

    Good luck!
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    Don't do it. I did French AEA today, and I really couldn't be arsed to sit a three hour paper when everyone else has already finished. Avoid them for that reason alone, it will piss you off no end.
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    I'm doing AEAs in all my subjects because my teachers have recommended that I do them. They don't need extra tuition but you do need to read more widely and to have a very good understanding of your A Level syllabus. You can get an A without knowing everything on your A Level syllabus but that doesn't work with AEA. I'm taking them because I love the subjects and it's good preparation for going to a top uni, which I hope to do. But the exams are slightly annoying...
 
 
 
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