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    (Original post by Atonement)
    Did anyone do Pope Rape of the Lock or Edward II questions? What did you think, which ones did you do?
    I did Edward II and Sonnets. I wasn't dead happy when I first looked at the Edward questions (Kent? You what?), but managed to think of a few things to say about the whole Edward sin thing. Eventually I realised that I could probably have done the Kent question, but had written half an essay by that point. I only put in a handful of quotes, and a couple of them I couldn't really remember, so I sort of made them up...they still said the same thing, but probably in slightly different words than Marlowe used! My essay wasn't very long, probably only five or six hundred words, and I sort of challanged the question, which they always tell you not to do - I picked up on the word "sins" and pointed out that maybe it wasn't the best word to use given Marlowe's (reasonably well-documented) atheism, although we can see how he plays to his audience throughout the play (Proud Rome, identification of young Prince/Lightborn with the Christ child/Lucifer, links with medieval and morality plays). And I debated what Edward's sins actually were, as a sort of conclusion-ish thing. Which question did you do? What did you think?
    Sonnets went better, I think. Did anyone else do them, which question did you pick, what did you think?
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    I did the same Edward question as you, and challenged the question too. I put he sins against both the government and God. I think we had to challenge the question in some way, because there's no way you could say Edward doesn't sin against God!! (Homosexuality etc) I didn't write anything about Marlowe's alleged atheism, but I got a fair bit of context in there, about the morality plays and Edward sinning against his government by ignoring his kingly duties, and how Elizabeth I was a moral queen.
    At first glance at the Edward questions, I thought the questions looked difficult, but then I realised there was a lot that could be included under the sins question and I could think of the sort of lines I'd write an essay for the Kent question, but I don't know all that many Kent quotes and just thought I'd be able to get more contextual info into the first one. So fingers crossed now!!
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    (Original post by t_muir11)
    The extracts were a little odd- I wonder why they only chose material about women, thats hardly typical is it? Anyway, could have been much worse I suppose. Hopefully its an alright b.

    Yeah, that's the point, you have to argue about the atypicality of them (in general, and also the typical elements of them)
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    The extracts definitely weren't what I was expecting, but after an initial errrr period I think I pulled it out pretty well. There was enough there to relate it to things I had revised even though the women's literature I'd looked at was fairly limited.

    1a was fairly straightforward I thought, pretty confident about Blake and Othello so the A I need is hopefully dans le sac. Or is it la sac?

    Bugger I need to revise French now
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    (Original post by LondonSteve181)
    I think everyone found this a hard paper. What i found particularly difficult was that a number of the extracts failed to mention contemporary society or indict war, so you had to infer. My conclusion was basically a Sh*te rehash of my essay. I dropped absolutely loads of names, talked about changing literary styles and even used quotes and the word 'iconoclastic' so its all good, i hope. However, i said that the term 'typical' is subversive when applied to a period which generated such diversity!

    Hopefully, if this board is an indication of what happened to most ppl, ie they didnt feel they achieved what they were capable of, AQA will be forced to drop the grade boundaries by a couple of marks. I've done sh*t loads of past papers and none were like that.

    Steve
    I went along the same lines for the conclusion, a war that spread across an entire continent and has been written about for a hundred years can't have anything "typical", etc.

    Hopefully because the extracts were kinda abstract the marking will be more lenient
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    I am the only one that talked about the Italian Sonnet form of 'Anthem...' and how it was ironic that such a style was usually reserved for romantic ideas and here it is used with stark bitterness and poignancy? That other poem was junk and boring.

    Judging by the amount of wider refs people on here got i think my teacher went way over the top. I got about 34 in over 10 pages of 1b. Clearly too much but they were relevant.

    i agreed that al extracts were typical just to avoid contradicting myself which i usually do in eng exams and even forget to put in full stops after about 5 lines!
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    I forgot to mention the irony of 'Anthem'- that the things 'mourning' the fallen soldiers- stuttering rifles, wailing shells etc... are the very things that killed them. Pretty key point, dammit.
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    (Original post by Grifter)
    I forgot to mention the irony of 'Anthem'- that the things 'mourning' the fallen soldiers- stuttering rifles, wailing shells etc... are the very things that killed them. Pretty key point, dammit.
    Don't worry, I forgot to say that too
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    I talked about the dichotomy between form and subject matter in AFDY. In as much as they used the italian sonnet form, written in iambic penatameter in AFDY which is normally reserved for romanticised poetry. I said this was an iconoclastic technique which in a way parodies war in as much as not all that glitters is gold. That is to say how something looks, our perception of it, isn't necessarily reality. In this way Owen mocks the jingoists and second wave poets such as Brooke for their ignorance.
 
 
 
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