in search for the correct term Watch

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Marko Andreis
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Hello group, Could someone help me. I am translating a text from Croatian to English, and I need to
translate a spelaeological term. What the English call the cave formation when a stalagmite and
stalactite connect. In Croatian we use a word "stalagnat", but I did not find anything similar in
any English dictionary. Thanks Marko Croatia
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Ian
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[email protected] wrote:

... ">: and I need to translate a spelaeological term. What the English call the ">: cave formation
when a stalagmite and stalactite connect. In Croatian we use ">: a word "stalagnat", but I did not
find anything similar in any English ">: dictionary. ">: Thanks ">: Marko ">: Croatia

I don't think stalagnat is known in English, though perhaps it should be. However, some caving
enthusiast will doubtless tell us if there is such a word in his vocabulary. I'd use 'pillar', or
possibly column, maybe with the adjective 'stone' in front of it, depending on the concext.
--
Ian Ft Worth, TX, USA
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Peter Duncanson
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On Wed, 17 Jul 2002 05:36:13 +0000 (GMT), [email protected] (Ian) wrote:

[q1]> [email protected] wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>... ">: and I need to translate a spelaeological term. What the English call the ">: cave formation[/q1]
[q1]>when a stalagmite and stalactite connect. In Croatian we use ">: a word "stalagnat", but I did not[/q1]
[q1]>find anything similar in any English ">: dictionary. ">: Thanks ">: Marko ">: Croatia[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I don't think stalagnat is known in English, though perhaps it should be. However, some caving[/q1]
[q1]>enthusiast will doubtless tell us if there is such a word in his vocabulary. I'd use 'pillar', or[/q1]
[q1]>possibly column, maybe with the adjective 'stone' in front of it, depending on the concext.[/q1]

"CAVE AND KARST TERMINOLOGY" by J. N. Jennings defines:

"COLUMN A speleothem from floor to ceiling, formed by the growth of a stalactite and a stalagmite to
join, or by the growth of either to meet bedrock" http://wasg.iinet.net.au/terminol.html

--
Peter D. UK (posting from uk.culture.language.english)
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John Ings
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On Wed, 17 Jul 2002 05:36:13 +0000 (GMT), [email protected] (Ian) wrote:

[q1]>I'd use 'pillar', or possibly column,[/q1]

Give the man a cigar!

"COLUMNS When a stalactite and stalagmite join together so there is a continual pillar of crystal
reaching from the floor to the roof it is known as a column."

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~rawhy...corations.html
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Owain
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[email protected] (Ian) wrote
[q1]> [email protected] wrote: ">: and I need to translate a spelaeological term. What the English[/q1]
[q1]> call the ">: cave formation when a stalagmite and stalactite connect. In Croatian we use ">: a[/q1]
[q1]> word "stalagnat", but I did not find anything similar in any English ">: dictionary. I don't think[/q1]
[q1]> stalagnat is known in English, though perhaps it should be. However, some caving enthusiast will[/q1]
[q1]> doubtless tell us if there is such a word in his vocabulary. I'd use 'pillar', or possibly column,[/q1]
[q1]> maybe with the adjective 'stone' in front of it, depending on the concext.[/q1]

But they're not stone, they're calcite. Perhaps none of the following examples are authoritative,
but they illustrate that 'column' is correct in common usage, and the final example makes a nice
distinction between pillar and column.

"And the Big Ben stalagtite, which is the largest one of several, comes down fifteen feet from the
ceiling. And then there are smaller ones growing up from the floor of the Grotto (and one is about
five feet, six feet high) and those are stalagmites. If they ever connect, they're called columns,
and we have three of these, where a stalagtite and a stalagmite have...grown together. It's very
rare, but we have 'em." from http://www.wfmu.org/LCD/20/jazzbo.html

When a stalactite and a stalagmite grow together, they form a column from floor to ceiling.
Stalactites, stalagmites, and columns are called dripstone because they are deposited by dripping
water. Flowing water also deposits calcite, making flowstone. A flowing stream of water can even
build dams of flowstone across itself. These are called rimstone dams. Scientists call all of these
calcite deposits "speleothems" from Greek words meaning cave rock. from
http://www.nps.gov/ozar/caveform.htm

Sometimes stalagmites and stalactites grow long enough to connect. These structures are called
columns. from http://healingstones.org/cavedecoration.htm

there is a large calcite column [Oxford University Cave Club archive] from
http://milos2.zoo.ox.ac.uk/~oucc/procs/proc1/yorks.htm

Column: A formation by which a stalactite and stalagmite have grown until they connect, thereby
joining roof to floor. A column should not be confused with a pillar, which is a bedrock feature and
deposital. from http://www.geocities.com/cavevader/c...ave_term_c.htm

Owain
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Marko Andreis
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Thank you for helping me. Marko
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Ian
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In article <ho0bjuo48tnm5hgtd1of84uberaj0nm [email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

">: On Wed, 17 Jul 2002 05:36:13 +0000 (GMT), [email protected] (Ian) wrote: ">: ">: >I'd use 'pillar',
or possibly column, ">: ">: Give the man a cigar! ">: ">: "COLUMNS ">: When a stalactite and
stalagmite join together so there is a continual ">: pillar of crystal reaching from the floor to
the roof it is known as a ">: column." ">: ">:
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~rawhy...corations.html ">: Hey, lookit that willya! I
scored a bullseye! Nyeeee-haaaw, as the locals here are wont to say. (Actually I try to discourage
this, as I dislike sudden loud noises...)
--
Ian Ft Worth, TX, USA
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Ian
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[email protected] wrote:

">: [email protected] (Ian) wrote ... ">: > I'd use 'pillar', or possibly column, maybe with the
adjective ">: > 'stone' in front of it, depending on the concext. ">: ">: But they're not stone,
they're calcite. Perhaps none of the following ">: examples are authoritative, but they illustrate
that 'column' is ">: correct in common usage, and the final example makes a nice ">: distinction
between pillar and column. ">: Yes, on reflection, "stone" isn't quite right. 'The stone pillars' or
the stone columns' in a descriptive passage would suggest to me more an artificial construction
crafted by masons like in an ancient temple or cathedral.

So it's one particular mineral, calcite, that forms them? Interesting. I'd supposed the water
seeping through a cave roof contained various solids from the soil above, that were left when the
water droplets carrying them evaporated after reaching the end of the stalactite.

">: "And the Big Ben stalagtite, which is the largest one of several, ">: comes down fifteen feet
from the ceiling. And then there are smaller ">: ones growing up from the floor of the Grotto (and
one is about five ">: feet, six feet high) and those are stalagmites. If they ever connect, ">:
they're called columns, and we have three of these, where a stalagtite ">: and a stalagmite
have...grown together. It's very rare, but we have ">: 'em." ">: from
http://www.wfmu.org/LCD/20/jazzbo.html ">: ">: When a stalactite and a stalagmite grow together,
they form a column ">: from floor to ceiling. Stalactites, stalagmites, and columns are ">: called
dripstone because they are deposited by dripping water. Flowing ">: water also deposits calcite,
making flowstone. A flowing stream of ">: water can even build dams of flowstone across itself.
These are called ">: rimstone dams. Scientists call all of these calcite deposits ">: "speleothems"
from Greek words meaning cave rock. ">: from http://www.nps.gov/ozar/caveform.htm ">: ">: Sometimes
stalagmites and stalactites grow long enough to connect. ">: These structures are called columns.
">: from http://healingstones.org/cavedecoration.htm ">: ">: there is a large calcite column
[Oxford University Cave Club archive] ">: from
http://milos2.zoo.ox.ac.uk/~oucc/procs/proc1/yorks.htm ">: ">: Column: A formation by which a
stalactite and stalagmite have grown ">: until they connect, thereby joining roof to floor. A
column should not ">: be confused with a pillar, which is a bedrock feature and deposital. ">: from
http://www.geocities.com/cavevader/c...ave_term_c.htm ">: ">: Owain ">:

--
Ian Ft Worth, TX, USA
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Molly
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On Wed, 17 Jul 2002, in article <[email protected] k>, RB News (RB News
<[email protected] uk>) wrote

[q1]>Incidentally, if anyone has trouble remembering which is which, I was taught:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Stalactites hold on tight (tite!) Stalagmites might (mite!) reach the top[/q1]

I was taught to remember them by "ants in the pants". The mites go up, and the tites come down!
--
Molly

If I'd known I'd be this thirsty this morning, I'd have drunk more last night.
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Rb News
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"Owain" <[email protected]> wrote
[q1]>snip< But they're not stone, they're calcite. snip<[/q1]
. Stalactites, stalagmites, and columns are called dripstone . . .
[q1]>snip<[/q1]
-----
Scientists call all of these calcite deposits "speleothems" from Greek words meaning cave rock. .
. . Calcite = stone, rock

but I'm nitpicking, it was a great explanation and I don't mean to denigrate the kind effort put in
to gather the information for our friend.

Incidentally, if anyone has trouble remembering which is which, I was taught:

Stalactites hold on tight (tite!) Stalagmites might (mite!) reach the top

Roger
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Mike Stevens
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"RB News" <[email protected] uk> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Owain" <[email protected]> wrote[/q1]
[q2]> >snip< But they're not stone, they're calcite. snip<[/q2]
[q1]> . Stalactites, stalagmites, and columns are called dripstone . . .[/q1]
[q2]> >snip<[/q2]
[q1]> -----[/q1]
[q1]> Scientists call all of these calcite deposits "speleothems" from[/q1]
Greek
[q1]> words meaning cave rock. .[/q1]
[q1]> . . Calcite = stone, rock[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> but I'm nitpicking, it was a great explanation and I don't mean to[/q1]
denigrate
[q1]> the kind effort put in to gather the information for our friend.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Incidentally, if anyone has trouble remembering which is which, I[/q1]
was
[q1]> taught:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Stalactites hold on tight (tite!) Stalagmites might (mite!) reach the top[/q1]

Or, even more memorably, the mites go up and the tights come down!

--
Mike Stevens, nb Felis Catus II No man is an island. So is Man. Off-list replies, please, to
[email protected] Web site http://www.mike-stevens.co.uk
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Bigal
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Molly wrote:
[q1]> On Wed, 17 Jul 2002, in article <[email protected] k>, RB News (RB News[/q1]
[q1]> <[email protected] uk>) wrote[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]>> Incidentally, if anyone has trouble remembering which is which, I was taught:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Stalactites hold on tight (tite!) Stalagmites might (mite!) reach the top[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> I was taught to remember them by "ants in the pants". The mites go up, and the tites come down! If[/q1]
[q1]> I'd known I'd be this thirsty this morning, I'd have drunk more last night.[/q1]

I was taught: stalaCtites from the ceiling stalaGmites from the ground.

BigAl
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