Asians Watch

This discussion is closed.
roff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#41
Report 13 years ago
#41
(Original post by vivado)
Actually, I know a lot of Indian friends (from India, not Singaporean Indians) both in university and during my A level days. Some of them are on scholarships here. So many I've met - if not almost all - are studying engineering, especially computer engineering. And this is not an overstatement because I've met quite a number of Indian students. But it may be because Medicine is very hard to get in here like in the UK and there are limited places for foreigners.
I'm confused, do you mean to say Indians that live in the UK and have lived here most of their lives still get counted as foreign and not as home students when they apply? Or only Indians coming from abroad?
0
roff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#42
Report 13 years ago
#42
(Original post by Bilal786)
Yeah I'm paki but choose to do medicine and was my choice; my parents just wanted me to end up doing something half-decent at uni.
you're pakistani NOT paki :rolleyes:
0
vivado
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#43
Report 13 years ago
#43
(Original post by ramroff)
I'm confused, do you mean to say Indians that live in the UK and have lived here most of their lives still get counted as foreign and not as home students when they apply? Or only Indians coming from abroad?
I'm not in the UK but Singapore. I was referring to Indians of Indian nationality, not the Singaporean Indians who were born and bred here and call themselves Singaporeans first.

EDIT: I think it's important to realise that the label 'Singaporeans' is one which encompasses people of many races (Chinese, Malay, Indian and Eurasian), and not just ethnic Chinese. Unlike Hong Kong for example, we are very much a multi-racial, multi-religious, multi-cultural society where racial and religious harmony is not just a motto, but a living reality.
0
London_psycho
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#44
Report 13 years ago
#44
Hey dudes, plz be more specific.
Check these stats. The bottom of this table is asians, and the top is asian. But notice the difference between the two. Im no hater, but It ticked me off when for example the culprits of the bradford riots were described as british asian, just for some political correctness ******** and not pinpointing a specific group of peeps. No indian got involved in the riots(in fact they were the victims from pakistanis actually), are they still british asian?
http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=268
0
Jazzy
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#45
Report 13 years ago
#45
hi everybody!

(slightly offtopic - this is a study into cultures: scroll down to India; I think this is meant to be a serius study but is quite funny:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/ecls/splang/int...ouhavesaid.htm
) :toofunny: :toofunny:


My main point:
If you have enough time I recommend reading this - they are officiall (university, gov, student orgs) documentation - generally about ethnic minorities:

(pdf's)

1) http://www.sussex.ac.uk/equalities/d...ence-rr552.pdf

2) http://www.hepi.ac.uk/downloads/TheS...encereport.pdf


anywho - I hope you find the reading informative!

danker
0
GreenMonstrosity
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#46
Report 13 years ago
#46
I am afraid there is truth in your generalisation. I think it is a cultural thing so that certain professions carry such prestige within those societies that everybody wants to do them (too often in my experience, for the wrong reasons). I know for instance, some public school boys I know, see public service as an unspoken expectation even where no pressure exists. Many of my Asian friends have confided this to me (although I wouldn't be so foolish as assume they speak for all asians or British people of asian descent). This creates problems when it comes to uni applications and job satisfaction thereafter. I know of at least one Indian student who gained something like 8 A*s at GCSE and 4 As at A Level getting near 100% or 100% in most modules, predicted the same at A2, who didn't get a single offer this year apparently because he failed to demonstrate more than a superficial interest in the the subject (medicine ) he wanted to study. One good friend of mine (who is also of Indian descent) and his brother were indeed pushed into it by parents. Some of my friends of Indian descent even if they prefer to study something else, go on and study medicine etc for the social prestige it brings them, and in order to please their parents. It is something of an expectation in some families and even if the expectation is unspoken its weight is felt. Furthermore, some societies - and this is not confined to any ethnic group - value the prestige that money brings, very highly. As I said, this is not confined to an ethnic group. I have seen this among public and independent school pupils I know.

Please read above that I have not made any generalisations and always specified that this is in my experience and may or may not reflect the general trend.
0
rico dan man
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#47
Report 13 years ago
#47
im not asian but it is probably tradition for the parents to have a strong role in their career choice, alot of my asian friends want to be docters. People here say "that generally asians do better", so does everyone and these comments can be degrading to other cultures (blacks). the way society is today, it put across an image of how different cultures are completelty different.
0
username23872
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#48
Report 13 years ago
#48
(Original post by Bilal786)
Yeah I'm paki but choose to do medicine and was my choice; my parents just wanted me to end up doing something half-decent at uni.
dont say Paki.. Paki is a bad word.. say Pakistani..
0
olddeblasio
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#49
Report 13 years ago
#49
Yeah I didn't say all parents fall into the a) or b) category, but both are sizeable, particularly b) which is perhaps the primary cause of the rising "chav culture". Obviously it would be ideal for all parents to go halfway (maybe skewed a bit more towards the former), but I think parents who don't care about their children's prospects are generally more of a problem than those that are 'pushy'.
I think there is a difference between not caring about their children's future and giving them the choice of what they want to do. My parents have never told me what career path or university course I should pursue, any advice they have given me has been along the lines of "do whatever you want to do". However, they certainly "care" - they want me to be happy. I think it is easy to be happy without being a doctor or a lawyer.

Could it not be something to do with the nature of Indian society? A materialism bred from large inequality and no sizable middle class? Here in the UK where there is a significant middle class, there isn't the same concentration on status and "high-flying" etc. as it is quite possible to live a perfectly happy and trouble free life on medium and low wages.
0
vivado
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#50
Report 13 years ago
#50
Perhaps it's unusual in the UK and elsewhere, but in South Korea, Singapore and certain Asian countries, the pressure to perform is so heavy it is not unheard of that school children as young as 10 have committed suicide because of their exam results (which may not actually be bad).

See Channel News Asia's report 'School stress forces Korean students to commit suicide' and Think Centre's 'Student Stress & Suicides'.

EDIT: By the way, this post is a response to the earlier comment that parents who don't care about their children's prospects are generally more of a problem than those that are 'pushy'.
0
GreenMonstrosity
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#51
Report 13 years ago
#51
(Original post by feedtheflamingo)
Could it not be something to do with the nature of Indian society? A materialism bred from large inequality and no sizable middle class? Here in the UK where there is a significant middle class, there isn't the same concentration on status and "high-flying" etc. as it is quite possible to live a perfectly happy and trouble free life on medium and low wages.
I was reluctant to put it so bluntly, but I think that you hit the nail right on the head.
0
Kayz
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#52
Report 13 years ago
#52
Have to edit* Nasbos Quotes been deleted by Mod.

Well Asians do strive in whatever they want to do, as well as cultural pressure plays a part, it runs in the majority of asian families ive seen,
0
amo1
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#53
Report 13 years ago
#53
i wanna be a mathmatition, (way cooler than a medic or lawyer)
0
donvito
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#54
Report 13 years ago
#54
i wanna become a lawyer and why the hell not??? If asians are cleverer, which they generally are....come on just face it....why shouldn't they enter the top professions??
0
roff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#55
Report 13 years ago
#55
"asians are clevere, which they generally are"

that is a bit of a crass generalisation!
0
GreenMonstrosity
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#56
Report 13 years ago
#56
(Original post by pjtailor)
i wanna become a lawyer and why the hell not??? If asians are cleverer, which they generally are....come on just face it....why shouldn't they enter the top professions??
YOU gross RACIST! Cleverness is not based on race or ethnicity! You despicable racist. In any case, you don't need tobe "clever" to enter the top professions, you need to work and study hard - and you do not need to be exceptionall intelligent to do that.
0
CorpusNinja
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#57
Report 13 years ago
#57
yeah, this problem (if it is that) will disappear within a generation i suspect. ppl take time to change their views and sometimes never will. my dad wanted me to be a doctor but i'm pursuing economics coz 1) medicine i found boring 2) i wanna do something different from what my family has done (medicine or engineering basically).
0
Scipio
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#58
Report 13 years ago
#58
(Original post by pjtailor)
i wanna become a lawyer and why the hell not??? If asians are cleverer, which they generally are....come on just face it....why shouldn't they enter the top professions??
They work harder. Genetics has a lot to do with intelligence but theres no actual proof that asians (specifically indians) are naturally more clever as a whole group.

edit: added a vital 'no' that I missed before
0
SinghFello
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#59
Report 13 years ago
#59
Getting high grades has nothing to do with intelligence.
Generally speaking, Indians (I can only generalise this race, because I’m a part of it) are pushed to study from a young age. Emphasis is on getting high grades, as many of 1st generation are either already in high positions in society (i.e. doctors), so want their offspring to exceed or meet their achievements, to uphold the family’s status.
Or have been the few that have suffered as a consequence of racial hatred when they immigrated, and don’t want their offspring to be in the same position that they were in.

My parents fit into the former, as they are both doctors. My bother and sister both are doing medicine, so there will be 4 doctors in my family! Nothing to do with brain power, its all to do with the upbringing.

I will probably do the same as my parents when I’m a parent. I don’t want my children to follow a path that will lead to disappointment and failure. Parents that encourage their children to follow there dream, trying to become an actor, or singer make me cringe. 99.9% of the time it leads to failure, so why bother encouraging them?
0
GreenMonstrosity
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#60
Report 13 years ago
#60
(Original post by Pav27)
They work harder. Genetics has a lot to do with intelligence but theres actual proof that asians (specifically indians) are naturally more clever as a whole group.
Utter balderdash. Show me the proof, and the professor who found it. Genetics has some but not as much as you imply to do with intelligence. It (only partly) governs the capacity to be intelligent and this is on an intra-population level not on an inter-population level. Please name your professor and stop making up facts to make yourself feel more important. This "master race" kind of talk is distasteful.
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (502)
37.74%
No - but I will (102)
7.67%
No - I don't want to (91)
6.84%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (635)
47.74%

Watched Threads

View All