Asians Watch

This discussion is closed.
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#81
Report 13 years ago
#81
(Original post by ramroff)
No, Pak* is a racial derogative.
Not at all, Is Brit a racial derogative?
Is Aussie a racial derogative?
NOT AT ALL

I hate all this you cant say this you cant say that. if you get offended by words then your a pretty insecure person.

If i choose to say paki then so be it its quciker than saying pakistani, just liek ppl abriviate michael to mike. No difference, get over it.
0
roff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#82
Report 13 years ago
#82
(Original post by Bilal786)
Well 'Pak' means pure (clean). http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com...Origin_of_Name
You know what I meant, I meant Paki....

Not at all, Is Brit a racial derogative?
Is Aussie a racial derogative?
NOT AT ALL

I hate all this you cant say this you cant say that. if you get offended by words then your a pretty insecure person.

If i choose to say paki then so be it its quciker than saying pakistani, just liek ppl abriviate michael to mike. No difference, get over it.
The key difference being Brit and Aussie had no negative racist connotations and were/are not used in a negative way by sections of society (BNP, rightwing groups, etc).

The proper name for a person from Pakistan is Pakistani.

Surely if there's nothing wrong with the word then why do you think it would be political suicide if someone like Blair used it on TV?
0
JonnyB
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#83
Report 13 years ago
#83
(Original post by MyHappyEnding)
If i choose to say paki then so be it its quciker than saying pakistani, just liek ppl abriviate michael to mike. No difference, get over it.
Whatever, thats balls and you know it really. "Paki" is known as a derogatory term, whereas Michael to Mike is not. Try and respect that someone finds something like that offensive.

Then again, it's a free forum, say whatever you want, but don't expect people to be reasonable with you.
0
lats
Badges: 0
#84
Report 13 years ago
#84
why does everyone assume that if an asian wants to do law or even medicine for that matter, it is because they are being pressured by their parents? i'm going to do law at university purely because at the time of my uni application it was something i thought i'd find interesting. my parents have supported (NOT pressured) me with this decision. having said that they were also supportive at different times in year 12 when i wanted to study either latin, psychology or english at university.
0
flipflop2
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#85
Report 13 years ago
#85
Myself and some of my indian friends have a NATURAL interest in the Human Body. It's not that we've been forced into doing it. I find Biology really interesting and look forward to having a Medical job.
0
almalm
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#86
Report 13 years ago
#86
(Original post by Bilal786)
Well 'Pak' means pure (clean). http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com...Origin_of_Name
But thats not the point, alot of people will use it as a derogitry term, its all about the intention.
0
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#87
Report 13 years ago
#87
(Original post by JonnyB)
Try and respect that someone finds something like that offensive.
Then they should grow up words are words they mean nothing unless you have a weak character. eg If you get called fat you either are or arn't. theres no two ways about it. Ok i find offensive someone obbrivates the name michael to mike. see where this leeds? its leads to arguments about the truely most pathetic things and why PC is a hinderence to the development of man. period
0
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#88
Report 13 years ago
#88
(Original post by almalm)
But thats not the point, alot of people will use it as a derogitry term, its all about the intention.
Intent? some one calls me a dumb blonde, i go i'm blonde by far the best hair colour, see im not offended!
0
vivado
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#89
Report 13 years ago
#89
(Original post by lats)
why does everyone assume that if an asian wants to do law or even medicine for that matter, it is because they are being pressured by their parents?
Let's get this straight once and for all. I don't assume this. Neither do I think everyone does.
0
roff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#90
Report 13 years ago
#90
(Original post by MyHappyEnding)
Then they should grow up words are words they mean nothing
Understatement of the year. Words have huge effects on things. They are how we communicate, wars are started through words (bit dramatic but you get my point)

the fact of the matter is it is socially unacceptable to use words like Paki. Are you saying if you heard Tony Blair use that word on TV you wouldn't even blink?
0
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#91
Report 13 years ago
#91
(Original post by ramroff)
Understatement of the year. Words have huge effects on things. They are how we communicate, wars are started through words (bit dramatic but you get my point)

the fact of the matter is it is socially unacceptable to use words like Paki. Are you saying if you heard Tony Blair use that word on TV you wouldn't even blink?
No infact i would laugh along with the rest of the nation, u see if paki wasnt looked down up on then the word would be used.
50 years ago it was ****** then it was coon then spade, wog, monkey. You see all happens is that a new word is invented. So untill ppl relaise that words are nothing but things they hear th better.

So vertically challenged is best suited than short? next it will be nationalistically challenged not foregin
0
lats
Badges: 0
#92
Report 13 years ago
#92
(Original post by vivado)
Let's get this straight once and for all. I don't assume this. Neither do I think everyone does.
maybe YOU dont assume it but i dont think you can speak for everyone else. The stereotype of an academic asian entails that they are in some way being pressured or directed to study certain subjects and eventually enter certain careers, if nobody had such views then this thread wouldnt have started or got so many replies.
0
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#93
Report 13 years ago
#93
(Original post by lats)
maybe YOU dont assume it but i dont think you can speak for everyone else. The stereotype of an academic asian entails that they are in some way being pressured or directed to study certain subjects and eventually enter certain careers, if nobody had such views then this thread wouldnt have started or got so many replies.
Well i agree with him, as do the majoirty of ppl who have posted on this thread
0
lats
Badges: 0
#94
Report 13 years ago
#94
(Original post by MyHappyEnding)
Well i agree with him, as do the majoirty of ppl who have posted on this thread
are you talking about me? coz im a she not a he... lol
0
MyHappyEnding
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#95
Report 13 years ago
#95
(Original post by lats)
are you talking about me? coz im a she not a he... lol
No u arab the person who staretd the thread
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#96
Report 13 years ago
#96
Doesn't surprise me that a lot of Asians wish to become doctors, hadn't realised it was similar with Law though.

A medical degree is a sure-fire way to be earning 100k give or take a few grand 10 years after leaving uni and a relatively huge starting salary. It's got a good societal reputation as a career.

A lot of Indians/Arabs work hard, so why not go into such a rewarding job?
0
GreenMonstrosity
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#97
Report 13 years ago
#97
(Original post by Sona)
It's in Asian GENES that we're often good at maths, and our parents push us to be strong in our sciences.
Which professor/s found this out and from which institute? Why do some people feel the need to back up their "master race" theories with pseudo-scientific theories?
0
cowsgomoo
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#98
Report 13 years ago
#98
(Original post by Chiron)
Which professor/s found this out and from which institute? Why do some people feel the need to back up their "master race" theories with pseudo-scientific theories?
oh dont be so touchy.
i know im generalising, but it's true a lot of asians are good at maths. i wasnt being pretentious or anything. theres a lot of things im bad at too.
0
vivado
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#99
Report 13 years ago
#99
(Original post by lats)
maybe YOU dont assume it but i dont think you can speak for everyone else. The stereotype of an academic asian entails that they are in some way being pressured or directed to study certain subjects and eventually enter certain careers, if nobody had such views then this thread wouldnt have started or got so many replies.
Please refer to my previous post. I was not speaking for everyone else. Nor did I say I could speak or was speaking for everyone else. For your information, I'm an Asian (born and bred Singaporean) living in Asia right now with many Asian friends and a first-hand knowledge and personal experience of Asian culture. I can tell you that stereotype you mention is not a myth at all, but this is completely different from saying that every single person on Earth assumes that, which I simply don't believe to be true. By virtue of the fact that (a) I am a person, and (b) I don't make such an unfair assumption without even personally knowing a person, there is at least 1 person in the whole wide world who does not hold the aforementioned assumption. Therefore your implicit categorical claim that everyone assumes an Asian wants to do law or medicine because they are being pressured by their parents can be easily proven to be false.

I'm sure most of us are mature enough to understand that stereotypes are simply crude generalisations of groups of people and do not apply to every single individual within a specific group. I wouldn't get upset over such a small matter when there are far more important issues in the world to contemplate and worry about.
0
impetus
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#100
Report 13 years ago
#100
(Original post by OliverPJ)
I respect your view but to be honest, I think the UK's trade regulations are irrelevant to what is being discussed. My observation of asians in India was that they strive to achieve better academically because the education system is perhaps organised a little better there. Furthermore, there is a noticeable difference in the importance that young asians assign to education there. For example, it is unlikely that an asian living in India is going to place clubbing and playing football in the park as a priority over doing their homework. This is simply down to the contrasting society out there and its influence on the youth.

I doubt that many indian teenagers work rigorously with the sole intention of succeeding so that they may overcome 'unfair trade rules' set out by the UK. It is more likely that they are striving to achieve their aspirations because they want social and financial security.
It seems you misunderstood me. Let me clarify. The curriculum in India is of course not decided by the students but by the government. And it is that curriculum which is so demanding of the students. If you compare the curriculum of the UK to theirs, there will be a lot less workload needed to get an A grade / high score. So why is the curriculum so hard?? Because A) trade rules that inhibit their global competitiveness.. which require that the future Indians are exceptionally skilled to overcome them.
The reason they personally work hard is because there is a large population but only a small number of good insitutes of further education. So as anyone can guess, to have even a reasonable lifestyle in the future, the students have to be at the top of the competition to be able to get in to good institutes.
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (145)
38.26%
No - but I will (21)
5.54%
No - I don't want to (28)
7.39%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (185)
48.81%

Watched Threads

View All