Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frances)
    91% in English,
    It's looking good for me then
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The problem is at least on my course to get 40% in an assignment is usualy very easy, you can spend 5 hours on an assignment and get 40%. To get 50% I would have to spend 10 hours, to get 60% it would be 20 hours etc and to get 70% it would be 30 hours.

    So although its easy to pass its very hard to get the good grades. Last year on my course only 45% got a 2:1 or higher.

    This year it should be higher but 20 people have been done for plagerising an assignment so they could all fail.

    I once got 75% on assignment, my tutor said I would have got 90% but two people (out of 90 at the time) did much better than me, so that really effected my marks.

    I really don't know how anybody can get a first, you have to be very hard working and very clever.

    To put into perspective I know somebody that got a 2:2 in Electrical Engineering and he is a genius, he knows all about microprocessor control and everything, he is now 22 and now earning £30k a year.

    So I think the value of a degree just depends on the subject and the person.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Does the 2:1 system also apply to the arts, or is it different?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ...Sprigged...)
    Does the 2:1 system also apply to the arts, or is it different?
    It applies to all degrees regardless of whether it is an arts or science course .
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Is it hard to get a 2:1 in a challenging subject like media studies?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ramroff)
    Is it hard to get a 2:1 in a challenging subject like media studies?
    Yes. What I think no matter subject you do, a 2:1 is hard to get and requires a lot of work.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ramroff)
    Is it hard to get a 2:1 in a challenging subject like media studies?
    Not sure if that was sarcsstic or not lol, but as people have already said, the marks needed for each degree class vary from university to university and from course to course. If media studies has high grade boundaries, which I believe it does at A-level, and the university is also quite good, then yes, it would be hard to get a 2.1. However, if the grade boundaries were really low and it was crap university, it wouldn't be too difficult. Same with any subject really; if everyone else on your course does well and you go to a decent university, it will be a challenge to get the top classifications.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    When I graduated last year 10 of us had a first.............about 20 people had a 2:1 and there were a couple of 2:2s and 3rds
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JackieS)
    When I graduated last year 10 of us had a first.............about 20 people had a 2:1 and there were a couple of 2:2s and 3rds
    Not bad in my opinion. It's good that no one got a pass degree though, as everyone got an honours degree (i.e. third class or above).
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trev)
    Not bad in my opinion. It's good that no one got a pass degree though, as everyone got an honours degree (i.e. third class or above).
    there were a few with sports therapy studies degree i.e. no honours eitherbecause they hadn't done a dissertation or because they had not done a module
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JackieS)
    there were a few with sports therapy studies degree i.e. no honours eitherbecause they hadn't done a dissertation or because they had not done a module
    I thought a dissertion was compulsary. In addition, if you don't do well in the second year, I thought you only do non-honours units or something like that, and therefore you will get a non-honours degree. :confused:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trev)
    I thought a dissertion was compulsary. In addition, if you don't do well in the second year, I thought you only do non-honours units or something like that, and therefore you will get a non-honours degree. :confused:
    it varies between uni's - at ours you dind't have to do a dissertation but if you didn't then you were short the number of credits you needed to get an honours degree so even if you aced all your other modules you still wouldn't get an honours as you'd be short on credits. We only had to pass the 1st and 2nd year - classification was based on 3rd year results only
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JackieS)
    it varies between uni's - at ours you dind't have to do a dissertation but if you didn't then you were short the number of credits you needed to get an honours degree so even if you aced all your other modules you still wouldn't get an honours as you'd be short on credits. We only had to pass the 1st and 2nd year - classification was based on 3rd year results only
    Alright then. I find it hard to base the degree classification only on 3rd year results, as most uni's base the degree classification on the second and third year degree. I think all the 3 years should go towards the degree classification, as if the first year doesn't count, it's kind of waste of effort (i.e. you work so hard in the first year, but it doesn't count).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trev)
    Alright then. I find it hard to base the degree classification only on 3rd year results, as most uni's base the degree classification on the second and third year degree. I think all the 3 years should go towards the degree classification, as if the first year doesn't count, it's kind of waste of effort (i.e. you work so hard in the first year, but it doesn't count).
    Haha, most people don't work very hard in the first year, mostly cause they know it doesn't count.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frances)
    Haha, most people don't work very hard in the first year, mostly cause they know it doesn't count.
    If they don't work hard, they won't pass though.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trev)
    If they don't work hard, they won't pass though.
    Well I certainly didn't work hard this year (I did some, but I certainly not enough) and I got a 2:1. Believe me, getting 40 is not that hard!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frances)
    Well I certainly didn't work hard this year (I did some, but I certainly not enough) and I got a 2:1. Believe me, getting 40 is not that hard!
    Alright then. So a 40% is a pass in uni is equivalent to a pass at A-levle (grade E)?

    I'm just worried that I won't get 40% as uni stuff is hard!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trev)
    Alright then. So a 40% is a pass in uni is equivalent to a pass at A-levle (grade E)?

    I'm just worried that I won't get 40% as uni stuff is hard!
    Well 40% at uni is a third, it's not really equivilant to a-levels. And just to pass is not really that hard in most subjects. If you actually do some work, then you'll be fine.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Frances)
    Well 40% at uni is a third, it's not really equivilant to a-levels. And just to pass is not really that hard in most subjects. If you actually do some work, then you'll be fine.
    I hope I can pass, as most of the assessment is coursework. :p:

    In most uni's, if you fail some units in the first year, would you be allowed to go onto the second year and resit those first year units?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    On the subject of grade classifications and passing, I thought I should share my experience on what I have noticed about the type of learners at university :p:

    Having just completed uni I believe there are three types of learners: "the progressive learners", "the exam time learners" and the "crammers"!

    The "progressive learners" are those that learn the content of the course as it is taught, this way they spend about an hour or two each day organising their notes and going over all the lecture slides, notes and tutorials that they learnt that day. So that when the exam time comes all they have to do is quickly skim over their notes and concentrate the rest of their time on practising past papers rather than revising the course content.

    The "exam time learners" are those that work just enough throughout the year to make sure they understand the material and can do the courseworks well. And about 1 month before the exams, they start to revise intensely but focusing mostly on the exam content rather than practising past papers and questions.

    And finally there are the "crammers", who spend most of the year copying off their friends work, and overall doing very little work. When exam time comes they either photocopy somebody elses notes or just revise from their own notes filled with doodles and with "very few" annotations. They then try and do targeted revising by revising those topics they believe are most likely to come up.

    And from what I have noticed, the "progressive learners" are the ones who mostly get the 1sts and 2:1s. The "exam time learners" get the 2:1s and 2:2s. While the "crammers" struggle behind and are mostly on 2:2s and 3rds.

    Although it is possible to classify students into other intermediate categories, I believe that these 3 categories are the most distinct categories of students you will find at university.

    PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS AS SOME SORT OF A GUIDE! :rolleyes: As It is very possible for a crammer to get a 1st and a progressive learner to get a 3rd as there are other factors such as abilty to understand and learn the material quickly that also come into effect.
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 18, 2005
The home of Results and Clearing

1,021

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.