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    wow thats gud. my first year was cramming. next year i think i will do some work. lol.
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    (Original post by trev)
    I hope I can pass, as most of the assessment is coursework. :p:

    In most uni's, if you fail some units in the first year, would you be allowed to go onto the second year and resit those first year units?
    If you nearly pass, and your average is reasonable, you may not have to resit the module at all. (Like I know someone who got 38% but because they got 40 for the year it was counted as a soft fail and they didn't have to resit.)

    If you fail totally, or its a core module, then you usually have to resit in summer, you need to pass to go onto the second year. If you fail again, what exactly happens is up to your uni.
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    Depends greatly on subject and uni.

    LSE average 2.1 and above is 73% ish yet for law its only 60% (quoted on open day.)
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    (Original post by tiantang)
    Depends greatly on subject and uni.

    LSE average 2.1 and above is 73% ish yet for law its only 60% (quoted on open day.)
    They work you hard in law! Sounds like way too much work for the likes of me!
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    (Original post by Frances)
    If you nearly pass, and your average is reasonable, you may not have to resit the module at all. (Like I know someone who got 38% but because they got 40 for the year it was counted as a soft fail and they didn't have to resit.)

    If you fail totally, or its a core module, then you usually have to resit in summer, you need to pass to go onto the second year. If you fail again, what exactly happens is up to your uni.
    Alright that's good then. It makes me feel better now. :p:

    How about if the core unit is a prerequisite for the second year, and the first year unit has a 38% mark, the person can continue right?

    It seems like some units are not prerequisites for the second year units for some reason.
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    (Original post by Frances)
    Well 40% at uni is a third, it's not really equivilant to a-levels. And just to pass is not really that hard in most subjects. If you actually do some work, then you'll be fine.
    As my course tutor said its virtualy impossible to fail the final year project, as longs as you do what it tells you to do you pretty much have a pass, but to get 50% is much harder and so on.

    Really you want to be averaging at least 60% and aim to get 65-70% in everrything becuase they will always be modules you find really difficult and only just pass, so if you have 65% in most modules but have 40% in say two you can still probably get a 2:1.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    As my course tutor said its virtualy impossible to fail the final year project, as longs as you do what it tells you to do you pretty much have a pass, but to get 50% is much harder and so on.

    Really you want to be averaging at least 60% and aim to get 65-70% in everrything becuase they will always be modules you find really difficult and only just pass, so if you have 65% in most modules but have 40% in say two you can still probably get a 2:1.
    If you don't do one part of a project or exam, can you loose a large percentage of the unit/modular grade or mark?

    I know they that add all the second and third year units up to see what degree classification you get overall, how is that done?
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    At least at Salford (but most universities seem to follow this rule, I know Manchester does) you have 120 credits per year, to get a degree you need 360 credits, each module is worth 10 credits but some are double or tripple modules.

    On a single module if you had an exam and assignment both worth 50% and you didn't bother to to assignment, you would have to pretty much get at least 90% in the exam to pass the module at 40%.

    With the classificiation they just work out the average mean percentage. So if you get 70% in the second year and 60% in the final year you will work out the perctanges as the final year is worh more than the second year. Its quite complex to work out.

    In my case my second year is worth 25% and my third year is worth 75%.
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    (Original post by KingsComp)
    On the subject of grade classifications and passing, I thought I should share my experience on what I have noticed about the type of learners at university :p:

    Having just completed uni I believe there are three types of learners: "the progressive learners", "the exam time learners" and the "crammers"!

    The "progressive learners" are those that learn the content of the course as it is taught, this way they spend about an hour or two each day organising their notes and going over all the lecture slides, notes and tutorials that they learnt that day. So that when the exam time comes all they have to do is quickly skim over their notes and concentrate the rest of their time on practising past papers rather than revising the course content.

    The "exam time learners" are those that work just enough throughout the year to make sure they understand the material and can do the courseworks well. And about 1 month before the exams, they start to revise intensely but focusing mostly on the exam content rather than practising past papers and questions.

    And finally there are the "crammers", who spend most of the year copying off their friends work, and overall doing very little work. When exam time comes they either photocopy somebody elses notes or just revise from their own notes filled with doodles and with "very few" annotations. They then try and do targeted revising by revising those topics they believe are most likely to come up.

    And from what I have noticed, the "progressive learners" are the ones who mostly get the 1sts and 2:1s. The "exam time learners" get the 2:1s and 2:2s. While the "crammers" struggle behind and are mostly on 2:2s and 3rds.

    Although it is possible to classify students into other intermediate categories, I believe that these 3 categories are the most distinct categories of students you will find at university.

    PLEASE DO NOT TAKE THIS AS SOME SORT OF A GUIDE! :rolleyes: As It is very possible for a crammer to get a 1st and a progressive learner to get a 3rd as there are other factors such as abilty to understand and learn the material quickly that also come into effect.
    makes perfect sense to me - was similar for pre-uni exams.

    I think that although the first year doesn't really count much (sometimes not at all) and that it might often not be too hard to get 40% (depending on subject and uni of course) it is probably still best to learn hard during the first year, because you are learning the basics in that year normally. As far as I can tell all the other years normally rely and build upon that knowlege taught in that first year, so if you don't do much work in your first year, you may not do too well and struggle in your other years.
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    Yeah, makes sense to me too, and I couldn't agree more with you, Adarah. Besides, wouldn't it be nice to have a nice grade to finish off the first year with style?
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    (Original post by Jandarini)
    Yeah, makes sense to me too, and I couldn't agree more with you, Adarah. Besides, wouldn't it be nice to have a nice grade to finish off the first year with style?
    it would certainly please your sponor or make it easier to find a sponsor for the remainder of your studies - just remembered that point! I missed the date to apply for a sponsorship from the BBC this year, but I'll try next year and if you approach a possible sponsor with bad grades... lol, I think you can forget it
    Same may apply (I'm not sure, just guessing) to getting a summer job in industry in your field of study. Say someone studying journalism wants a summer job at a newspaper and 10 students apply, they'll take the ones with the better grades I'd think.
    There are many reasons for working hard in your first year.
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    Goodness, Adarah, I had no idea one could apply for a sponsorship from the BBC! What exactly does that involve? (Also, completely off-topic, but would you happen to speak Italian? Whereabouts in Italy do you live?)
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    (Original post by Jandarini)
    Goodness, Adarah, I had no idea one could apply for a sponsorship from the BBC! What exactly does that involve? (Also, completely off-topic, but would you happen to speak Italian? Whereabouts in Italy do you live?)
    No, I don't speak Italian, I live in the North of Italy, Dolomites . So I speak English and German and a little French (no! don't try and talk to me in French! lol, I could understand you but not answer in French ).

    Well, it depends which subject you want to study at uni... I know that the BBC has a few sponsorships to give away for Physics students. Other firms and institutions sponsor students too, you should try and get in contact with the British Council to inquire about them (their website sucks though, be warned, it crashes all the time :p: ). I know from the British council about that sponsorship from the BBC for physics students, but once I've started my studies I'll just go straight to the BBC and ignore the British Council, who are really disorganised in my opinion.
    What subject are you going to study?
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    Thanks for the information. Well, I'll be studying Japanese and Politics at SOAS, so it looks like technically I'm not entitled to the BBC sponsorship - but I'll definitely give the British Council a ring! It's a little annoying, though, isn't it, that EU students aren't allowed to apply for student loans, etc.!

    You are very lucky to live in Italy. I'll be going there this summer with my parents (joy), but have never had the opportunity to see much of it. Do the Dolomites correspond to the Alto Adige region? Also, will you be studying Physics?
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    (Original post by Jandarini)
    Thanks for the information. Well, I'll be studying Japanese and Politics at SOAS, so it looks like technically I'm not entitled to the BBC sponsorship - but I'll definitely give the British Council a ring! It's a little annoying, though, isn't it, that EU students aren't allowed to apply for student loans, etc.!

    You are very lucky to live in Italy. I'll be going there this summer with my parents (joy), but have never had the opportunity to see much of it. Do the Dolomites correspond to the Alto Adige region? Also, will you be studying Physics?
    Ah, well, you never know... the BBC may sponsor politics and japanese - makes more sense than them sponsoring physics students! :eek: But I only looked for information on Physics sponsorships. (edit: oh yeah, Physics at Imperial College)

    It annoys me too about not getting the loan . Mainly because I just won't get any help from any government, I wish there were some kind of EU loan you could get, so that people who move around in the EU and don't do all their education in one country aren't at a disadvantage. Oh well... I'm sure I'll manage somehow :p:
    I'm in the Veneto region, but near the Alto Adige region . The Dolomites are basically the mountains between Italy and Austria. The Alps are between Italy, France and Switzerland. The same mountain range really, just a different name for some reason.
 
 
 
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