bnp - utter rudness Watch

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material breach
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#181
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#181
(Original post by andyukguy)
Your condescending tone makes me no want to answer your question. So I wont.

Andrew
what a cop out
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andyukguy
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#182
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#182
(Original post by material breach)
what a cop out
Frustrating isn't it?

Andrew
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technik
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#183
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#183
(Original post by The Basilisk)
How much money is wasted in the BBC? Loads. Blue peter need a new studio- wait- there's another African dead. The money isn't spent well here either and yes, help britain - but what about Africa? Help them too for they are dying NOW.
i quite like the BBC.

i dont see what it has to do with the post you quoted though. possibly just a reply for replies sake.

correct me if im wrong, but are africans the only people who die? are us british immortal?
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technik
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#184
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#184
(Original post by andyukguy)
It does explain a lot, lines like how you think you'll adopt 5 african kids. That instantly made me think you weren't all that old.

Andrew
when he has more to think about than his key stage 3 exams, he wont be so idealistic.
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technik
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#185
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#185
(Original post by FarnhamBoy)
Has anyone noticed the links to "Funny Pics" in Andyukguy's sig? A touch offensive, or a bit of fun? Opinions please..
i laughed out loud at the smiling one. so did all my classmates
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andyukguy
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#186
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#186
(Original post by technik)
i laughed out loud at the smiling one. so did all my classmates
Plenty more where that came from, updates soon

Btw, I believe The Basilisk is a she.

Andrew
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shadowkin
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#187
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#187
(Original post by technik)
i quite like the BBC.

i dont see what it has to do with the post you quoted though. possibly just a reply for replies sake.

correct me if im wrong, but are africans the only people who die? are us british immortal?
erm i think they meant due to preventable diseases and extreme poverty.
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technik
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#188
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#188
(Original post by shadowkin)
erm i think they meant due to preventable diseases and extreme poverty.
people die of preventable diseases here in the UK too...

and extreme poverty? my mate was out in kenya last year on some church excursion thing and he said that the people lived in huts with next to nothing but they were happy because its what they've always had and always will have. they have neither the need or desire for more. just because someone doesnt have electricity or a washing machine wurring in the garage doesnt mean they are poor. its a relative statement that needs to be factored in.
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sortofdifferent
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#189
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#189
Choice and ease of access, is only available if you can afford it. Those who are rich stand to reap the benefits of globalisation and gain more wealth, while the poor just fall further behind. Indeed, poorer people in rich countries are starting to suffer as unskilled and semi-skilled jobs are moved to countries where people work in bad conditions for poverty wages.

Part of the cause of this imbalance is the structure of so-called 'free trade'. Through the World Trade Organisation (WTO), International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank, Western industrialised nations have encouraged developing countries to remove import tariffs on goods and allow foreign industries to compete with domestic ones on equal terms. In theory everyone trades on the same footing.

In practice this seldom occurs. For instance, in 2001 Mali opened its cotton industry to free trade, but that industry is now dying. This is mainly because the United States subsidises its own large but expensive cotton industry. American farmers claim payments so they can meet the high standards of health and safety that they are required to keep. But the subsidies are so generous that they can ship their cotton to Mali and still sell it cheaper than Malians can produce it. This pattern is repeated throughout the developing world, where the USA and European Union have created unequal competition with poor nations.


Although poverty was horrifying in the first century, the scale has now grown beyond all imagining. Of the 4.4 billion people living in developing countries, three-fifths lack sanitation, one third have no access to clean water, one fifth have no form of healthcare or enough dietary energy or protein, and the number of undernourished people is climbing by 5 million a year.

The WHO's 1995 annual report states that poverty was the main reason why babies weren't vaccinated, children caught dysentery from infected water, and people could not get drugs and other treatments.

The doctor to population ratio in Uganda is 1:24,000,[26] in comparison with about 1:700 in England.



Think on that, naysayers.
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material breach
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#190
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#190
(Original post by sortofdifferent)
Choice and ease of access, is only available if you can afford it. Those who are rich stand to reap the benefits of globalisation and gain more wealth, while the poor just fall further behind. Indeed, poorer people in rich countries are starting to suffer as unskilled and semi-skilled jobs are moved to countries where people work in bad conditions for poverty wages.

Part of the cause of this imbalance is the structure of so-called 'free trade'. Through the World Trade Organisation (WTO), International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank, Western industrialised nations have encouraged developing countries to remove import tariffs on goods and allow foreign industries to compete with domestic ones on equal terms. In theory everyone trades on the same footing.

In practice this seldom occurs. For instance, in 2001 Mali opened its cotton industry to free trade, but that industry is now dying. This is mainly because the United States subsidises its own large but expensive cotton industry. American farmers claim payments so they can meet the high standards of health and safety that they are required to keep. But the subsidies are so generous that they can ship their cotton to Mali and still sell it cheaper than Malians can produce it. This pattern is repeated throughout the developing world, where the USA and European Union have created unequal competition with poor nations.


Although poverty was horrifying in the first century, the scale has now grown beyond all imagining. Of the 4.4 billion people living in developing countries, three-fifths lack sanitation, one third have no access to clean water, one fifth have no form of healthcare or enough dietary energy or protein, and the number of undernourished people is climbing by 5 million a year.

The WHO's 1995 annual report states that poverty was the main reason why babies weren't vaccinated, children caught dysentery from infected water, and people could not get drugs and other treatments.

The doctor to population ratio in Uganda is 1:24,000,[26] in comparison with about 1:700 in England.

Think on that, naysayers.
This forum doesnt seem to be doing interlectual replies at the moment partly as it seems to be full of half wits so dont expect anything more than token comments. So I just hope you dont expect people to actual debate what you have written.
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technik
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#191
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#191
(Original post by material breach)
This forum doesnt seem to be doing interlectual replies at the moment partly as it seems to be full of half wits so dont expect anything more than token comments. So I just hope you dont expect people to actual debate what you have written.
perhaps you'll start with an "interlectual" reply of your own?
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material breach
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#192
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#192
(Original post by material breach)
Have you ever heard of a 19th century priest called Thomas Malthus, he said among other things that the amount of resources on Earth are finite. Now this is obviously true, now who in the world do you think controls all the world's resources? The rich guys or the poor guys? Well obvioulsy the rich guys. Through bodies like the IMF and the World Bank which are heavily funded by western nations, they are able to suggest to the poorer nations of the world what economic policies they should follow. The problem is that these policies often don't give the best results for the people in those countries and instead favour the western nations.

Take the example of Indonesia. Descirbed by the world bank as a "model pupil of globalisation" in 1997. Within weeks, the stock marker crashed and 70 million were living in absolute poverty. This finally forced the dicator Suharto to resign taking with him severance pay equiavlent to 13% of the countries foregin debt. A great idea that was? Guess who thought up that economic plan, that would be the IMF and the world bank. They proposed a free market economy. Mean while here in Europe do we have the same sort of economy for our farmers, erm no cos we've got CAP. Isn't life fair.

So as you can see while the west is civilised and domesticed, it is often because they have been taking advantage of 3rd nations by giving duff advice about what is right economically for their countries. It is no suprise then that we are doing so well and that Africa where exactly the same sorts of things are happening is so f****ed.
Like this one Technik which so far no one has bothered challeneging despite the fact it goes very much against the spirt of that preached by so many members on this thread.
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technik
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#193
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#193
(Original post by material breach)
Like this one Technik which so far no one has bothered challeneging despite the fact it goes very much against the spirt of that preached by so many members on this thread.
why would i challenge it? it seems quite plausible.
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material breach
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#194
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#194
(Original post by technik)
why would i challenge it, it seems quite plausible.
Did i specify you would? I am glad you agree tho.
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JonD
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#195
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#195
Have you ever heard of a 19th century priest called Thomas Malthus, he said among other things that the amount of resources on Earth are finite.
As I remember, his theory was actually that the population would grow, but the food supply wouldn't. He expected mass famine in England by 1830. He influenced a lot of people: he inspired Darwin's Theory of Evolution, encouraged urgency to be put into censuses, and changed the attitude of economists who previously measured a large working population as a virtue. Of course, he relied upon a handful of variables to predict the future, ignoring changes in the world entirely - it never happened, thank technology. People tend to use the term "Malthusian Catastrophe" prejoratively to describe emotive, but flawed apocalypse theories.
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ArthurOliver
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#196
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#196
(Original post by JonD)
As I remember, his theory was actually that the population would grow, but the food supply wouldn't. He expected mass famine in England by 1830. He influenced a lot of people: he inspired Darwin's Theory of Evolution, encouraged urgency to be put into censuses, and changed the attitude of economists who previously measured a large working population as a virtue. Of course, he relied upon a handful of variables to predict the future, ignoring changes in the world entirely - it never happened, thank technology. People tend to use the term "Malthusian Catastrophe" prejoratively to describe emotive, but flawed apocalypse theories.
True enough.
Do we now need to think about how our food production relies on oil, and if peak-oil theory is correct, worry about our population a few decades hence?

And does material breach's post suggest that we need to look at our definition of 'the west'. It seems to mean an international business and financial elite, rather than the people of European civ.
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JonD
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#197
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#197
Well, the core Peak Oil thinkers are smart people, who look far ahead, but their theory seems to require some secret cabal of businessmen & world leaders - trying to keep our imminent disaster secret - for it to make sense. These too would be smart people, who look far ahead; so far ahead that they would have pumped trillions into alternative fuel research by now, so they wouldn't lose their power when that disaster happens - which there is no sign of. So I find it a bit self-refuting. A Post-Peak Oil world would make good sci-fi dystopia, though.
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material breach
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#198
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#198
(Original post by JonD)
As I remember, his theory was actually ....
That wasn't the only thing he said.
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JonD
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#199
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#199
(Original post by material breach)
That wasn't the only thing he said.
Well, if he also said the amount of wealth is finite, he's not original. Kings usd to really believe that if they wanted to enrich their kingdom, they must conquer and plunder their rivals; something very outdated by the end of Malthus's lifetime.
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material breach
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#200
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#200
(Original post by JonD)
Well, if he also said the amount of wealth is finite, he's not original. Kings usd to really believe that if they wanted to enrich their kingdom, they must conquer and plunder their rivals; something very outdated by the end of Malthus's lifetime.
I never suggested he was.

You don't think then that moves by countries in the world at the moment to secure natural resources suggest that these ideas are far from out dated? E.g the politicis concerning the Euphrates.
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