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    (Original post by meir)
    Chemist Boy:
    i dont know if there is more or less postgrad study at glam than at other uni's, i would guess its about average. If there are more at Glamorgan, then it must reflect on the teaching and quality of the forensic course.
    I know there are a few students going on to MSc's and at least one PhD from this years graduates.
    Well there are lots of MSc's in there, which means that people are taking a further course to become (mostly) toxicologists by the sounds of it. MSc's don't really say anything about the quality of the course I'm afraid as they are paid for courses so uni's accept most people on them if they can pay for them.

    i dont consider the forensic course watered down, it is not straight chemistry, but the other aspects give you a better all round education.
    That was actually aimed at me, but simply because what I was saying has been misinterpreted. I would like to see how you can back up that you get a 'better all round education', for a start I don't see how that is neccesarily relevant.

    Working in the Forensic Science Service, having a chem or biol degree may not be completely relevant (just my opinion!!!).
    Which is why one would do an MSc in forensics beforehand.

    As for Australia, i read an article a few months back (cant find it, cant remember where is saw it) saying that in near future there was going to be a lack of well qualified scientists in Australia. (forensics wasn't mentioned, just 'scientists')
    There was a similar article in ChemistryWorld (it might even be the same one), I think that it really refers to PhD qualified scientists who are active researchers, not really relevant for first degree graduates.
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    (Original post by meir)
    Kazzz:
    i dont consider the forensic course watered down, it is not straight chemistry, but the other aspects give you a better all round education.
    The Forensic Services have mostly employed chem or biol grads in past because there were a lot more of them about.
    Working in the Forensic Science Service, having a chem or biol degree may not be completely relevant (just my opinion!!!).

    As for Australia, i read an article a few months back (cant find it, cant remember where is saw it) saying that in near future there was going to be a lack of well qualified scientists in Australia. (forensics wasn't mentioned, just 'scientists')
    There is a student who has just completed the course at Glam who has found employment in forensics with New Zealand Police, she had her interview in London and is emigrating later this summer.
    Sorry, Of course they are not watered down courses... I was refering to someone else's opinion of Forensic Science! Agree with everything you have said on this thread.

    I know there are very few Forensics degree's in Australia.. Not sure if thats a good thing or a bad thing lol. Im visiting family there in 2 years so intend to find out all I can before I go, and while im out there.
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    chemist boy, have you ever done a forensic degree, you sound like you are an expert on the subject?
    Reading your other posts, you are an expert on many different topics.

    Why are you singling out MSC's, is there something wrong with them, you mean to tell me if you do straight chemistry it is better than doing an MSc?

    my original list of positions are an example of what students have gone on to do, whether they are MSC, PhD or anything else has got 'everything' to do with the value employers put on qualifications from Glamorgan.

    And why have a go at me over remark i said about Australia, i said 'well qualified' i wasnt sure of exact words of article, i did say i couldnt find it.
    In two years time, if Kazzz does get to Australia, doing a PhD might be a good move.
    And a first degree is very relevant to PhD's, the majority who do PhD's are degree graduates, or have i got that wrong too? (and some even do MSC's, but i forgot, you dont class those as worthy)
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    Can anyone actually remember why they're argueing?
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    (Original post by meir)
    chemist boy, have you ever done a forensic degree, you sound like you are an expert on the subject?
    Reading your other posts, you are an expert on many different topics.
    Nope, I have an informed opinion on many topics, I have never claimed to be an expert, however I have heard experts expressing many of the opinions I hold on this subject.

    Why are you singling out MSC's, is there something wrong with them, you mean to tell me if you do straight chemistry it is better than doing an MSc?
    I'm sorry you've lost me here...

    my original list of positions are an example of what students have gone on to do, whether they are MSC, PhD or anything else has got 'everything' to do with the value employers put on qualifications from Glamorgan.
    Well going on to postgraduate study is not employment so I don't see how you can infer what value employers put on that degree by the number of students going into postgraduate education. MSc and PhD are very different, a 2:1 in most science subjects will get you onto a PhD programme. MSc's are for those who want to change their specialism or have failed to get adequate first degree grades. I was merely pointing out that most graduates, regardless of degree type or class can do an MSc provided they pay for it. I'm not having a go at you, just stating a fact.

    And why have a go at me over remark i said about Australia, i said 'well qualified' i wasnt sure of exact words of article, i did say i couldnt find it.
    I didn't have a go at you...? I was just pointing out that the shortage is for scientific researchers, not graduates - you said you were unsure so I thought I was helping...

    In two years time, if Kazzz does get to Australia, doing a PhD might be a good move.
    I would stay in this country for postgrad.

    And a first degree is very relevant to PhD's, the majority who do PhD's are degree graduates, or have i got that wrong too? (and some even do MSC's, but i forgot, you dont class those as worthy)
    I never said that is wasn't relevant to PhD studies, I am not an idiot.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)

    I would stay in this country for postgrad.
    May I ask why?

    Its something I have been looking into... PhD before I move or after.... Cant seem to find much info in the internet about PhD's in Australia.
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    (Original post by kazzz)
    May I ask why?

    Its something I have been looking into... PhD before I move or after.... Cant seem to find much info in the internet about PhD's in Australia.
    Funding. Here you are classed as a home student and are eligible for funding by the research councils (most probably BBSRC, MRC or EPSRC) as well as university and industrial sponsership. In australia the funding options are much reduced, although it is possible to get a PhD you would probably have to have contacts. Also the funding in the UK is more generous than australia according to the australia postdoc in our group, and there are more and varied research opportunities in this country at postgraduate level.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Funding. Here you are classed as a home student and are eligible for funding by the research councils (most probably BBSRC, MRC or EPSRC) as well as university and industrial sponsership. In australia the funding options are much reduced, although it is possible to get a PhD you would probably have to have contacts. Also the funding in the UK is more generous than australia according to the australia postdoc in our group, and there are more and varied research opportunities in this country at postgraduate level.
    Ah right... thanks

    Might be staying in this country longer than I thought then
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    (Original post by kazzz)
    Ah right... thanks

    Might be staying in this country longer than I thought then
    Doing a PhD is a great experience so you won't be too depressed. Of course you are then more marketable abroad - at least that's the theory.
 
 
 
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