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    Hellllloooooooo. Just thought if id start a thread for william Blake where everyone can ask questions and tosss around ideas. If anyone has questions on him ill be willlling to help - not only will it help with my revision by explaining it but also our teacher was mad on him and so we covered quite alot of stuff on him!!!
    Just out of interest, did anyone go on that Blake Revision day in April in London - if so did anyone else find it crap and very unuseful??
    xx
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    Blake rocks, well Songs of Experience do, but Songs of Experience is lame, who cares about the lamb?

    I'm learning Holy Thursdays, Earth's Answer, Night, Chimney Sweeper, Infant Sorrow. I think, I actually like this exam its a lot better than the damn war one!
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    (Original post by Lila18)
    Hellllloooooooo. Just thought if id start a thread for william Blake where everyone can ask questions and tosss around ideas. If anyone has questions on him ill be willlling to help - not only will it help with my revision by explaining it but also our teacher was mad on him and so we covered quite alot of stuff on him!!!
    Just out of interest, did anyone go on that Blake Revision day in April in London - if so did anyone else find it crap and very unuseful??
    xx
    Yep I went to that - it was a pile of poo. I also lost the booklet thing they gave out, so all in all it was a complete waste of time. I like Blake too, what are your favourites poems? I'm learning about 15-20 of them, not all off by heart though, just enough so I can talk confidently about them.

    Was just looking at The Sick Rose - does anybody know how the 'worm' is a symbol of religion/priests perverting natural desires and making them shameful?
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    Erm I don't know, to be fair I haven't looked at that. Although the gravestones in The garden of Love repesent the repessed natural instincts of man such as love, sex, freedom and liberty.
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    (Original post by LondonSteve181)
    Erm I don't know, to be fair I haven't looked at that. Although the gravestones in The garden of Love repesent the repessed natural instincts of man such as love, sex, freedom and liberty.
    Yeah I was thinking along the same lines, esp. because there is a mention of roses in G of Love "binding with briars my joys and desires" - it seems to kind of mean the same thing. I also read that the gravestones represent Blake's opposition to the church's doctrines of predestination - that a person's fate (i.e. whether they're going to heaven and hell) has been decided before birth and they can't do anything to change it. Blake believed that the Church spent too much time talking about death (hence the tombstones where flowers should be), which bred despair (marks of weakness, marks of woe).
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    (Original post by Lila18)
    Hellllloooooooo. Just thought if id start a thread for william Blake where everyone can ask questions and tosss around ideas. If anyone has questions on him ill be willlling to help - not only will it help with my revision by explaining it but also our teacher was mad on him and so we covered quite alot of stuff on him!!!
    Just out of interest, did anyone go on that Blake Revision day in April in London - if so did anyone else find it crap and very unuseful??
    xx

    I went to that and found some parts useful. The stuff they said about form and structure was the only useful stuff I found though.
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    I went to that too. The last lecture on romanticism, was there much relevance to our exam? or do you think its "skippable"??
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    (Original post by twinkledust)
    I went to that too. The last lecture on romanticism, was there much relevance to our exam? or do you think its "skippable"??
    It seemed to me they spoke more about Wordsworth, Keats et al than Blake himself. I think you can mention in the exam how some of the aspects of Blake's Songs could be compared to Romanticism, e.g. the importance of children/ rejection of cool rationalism.... but I don't think you need to go into too much detail. I hope not anyway!
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    Away from the revision day.....how come loads of you have mentioned that you are only studying a few of the poems. We have been through every single one in innocence and experience. Some of the questions ask you to explore certain poems, so wouldnt you be in a bad position if both questions asked that?!?
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    (Original post by louinwonderland)
    Yep I went to that - it was a pile of poo. I also lost the booklet thing they gave out, so all in all it was a complete waste of time. I like Blake too, what are your favourites poems? I'm learning about 15-20 of them, not all off by heart though, just enough so I can talk confidently about them.

    Was just looking at The Sick Rose - does anybody know how the 'worm' is a symbol of religion/priests perverting natural desires and making them shameful?
    In the sick rose, the worm represents male sexuality, hence "o rose thou art sick", as the worm shelters form the weather in the rose (female sexuality.)
    It represents how the roses beauty and innocence (female sexuality) is taken away by the worm!
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    it seems to kind of mean the same thing. I also read that the gravestones represent Blake's opposition to the church's doctrines of predestination - that a person's fate (i.e. whether they're going to heaven and hell) has been decided before birth and they can't do anything to change it. [/QUOTE]
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    That is interesting, the gravestones could be saying that due to the church's dogmatic stance on human instincts that people are never really alive in the first place as the church usurps their right to free choice. The way in which the priests are described is very automatic and machine-like, as if humans are just zombies.

    Steve
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    (Original post by Char19)
    Away from the revision day.....how come loads of you have mentioned that you are only studying a few of the poems. We have been through every single one in innocence and experience. Some of the questions ask you to explore certain poems, so wouldnt you be in a bad position if both questions asked that?!?

    I don't think any of the past questions have been on specific poems :confused: - you can choose to examine 3-4 poems or range through the Songs. Learning all of them would just totally boggle my brain, but if you can do it then i applaud
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    I'm looking for easy to remember quotes that show a) the loving, kind god e.g. that could make the lamb, and b) the cruel vengeful god shown in the tyger, but from other poems. Anything?!
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    (Original post by louinwonderland)
    It seemed to me they spoke more about Wordsworth, Keats et al than Blake himself. I think you can mention in the exam how some of the aspects of Blake's Songs could be compared to Romanticism, e.g. the importance of children/ rejection of cool rationalism.... but I don't think you need to go into too much detail. I hope not anyway!
    There's been a question on Romanticism before, it could come up again.


    (Original post by Char19)
    Away from the revision day.....how come loads of you have mentioned that you are only studying a few of the poems. We have been through every single one in innocence and experience. Some of the questions ask you to explore certain poems, so wouldnt you be in a bad position if both questions asked that?!?
    There haven't been any specific poems named in questions on the AQA syllabus, are you doing OCR?
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    (Original post by Wrinkles)
    I went to that and found some parts useful. The stuff they said about form and structure was the only useful stuff I found though.
    Hmm, I'm having trouble with writing about structure and form, could anyone give me some help (especially with regards the "main" poems - holy thurs, chimney-sweepers, london)? I know about ballad form/trochaic tetrameter of tyger... er... that's about it. Don't know about types of meter used by Blake, how they vary from innocence 2 experience ..... Any advice would be great.

    Thankyou fellow-Blakeians.
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    It is helps then Garden of Love is written in regular anapaests giving a light, bouncy rhythm and this provides a background for the poem. It gives an elated, euphoric sense, thus reminding us of the true nature of the garden of Love. Of course tihs contrasts with the monochromatic degredation of the garden which has bene usurped by the church. Thus the euphoric anapaests seem melancholy.
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    I hate Blake, I think he was a useless idiot who faulted everything was his country but did nothing to change it. He was, lets face it, probably on drugs and if alive today would most likely be in prison for child paedophilia. Dont get me wrong, I really tried to like him, Londons ok but why catagorise things into EITHER innocence or experience. His mediochre poetry is far too abstract, and I really am not looking forward to the exam next week!!!
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    i think you've slightly underestimated Blake; his criticisms of his contemporary society were very forward thinking and, in my opinion, justified. I doubt that you would enjoy sweeping chimneys. I also don't think that you can totally dismiss a poet because he most probably used drugs unless you are also willing to dismiss the majority of popular culture. And a paedophile? I think not. He most definately does not catergorise things into EITHER innocence or experience but acknowledges that 'without contraries there is no progression.' Even in 'Songs of Innocence' there are suggestions of the 'darkening green'.
    "His mediochre poetry is far too abstract, and I really am not looking forward to the exam next week!!!" If this is your opinion you are missing out on an amazing experience. Perhaps his poetry is only 'too abstract' because you haven't uncovered the layers of meaning.

    Oh, and london is not simply 'ok' it's stunning. One of the most poignant poems i've read and certainly far superior to many of his contemporaries who dismissed him as unfairly as you.
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    I totally agree, i think his experience poems are amazing. I think people need to realise that his utopian visions aren't in fact superfluous dreams but in fact implicit calls for social revolution. He has a full grasp of his time and the reality of his age.
 
 
 
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