Turn on thread page Beta

Will a degree in Japanese and Economics be seen as a watered-down economics degree? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I'm applying to SOAS this year for the degree entitled: 'Japanese and Economics'

    Will this be seen as a 'watered down' economics degree?
    In other words, would it be a no-brainer for firms to higher 'straight economics' students over me?

    I'm really not sure whether to sacrifice my 'love' (japanese) over potential career prospects (straight economics)

    I want to go into investment banking in the future. But I would also love learning Japanese. The degree involves a year in Japan too.

    Opinions please.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    No If anything it will help you out, if you can speak Japanese it will be a big benefit especially to global firms. Also depends on the split, if its like 70 - 30 of economics and you come out speaking fluent Jap then its very good, if its the other way round then it might hinder you a bit.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I know nothing about economics by the way, so feel free to completely ignore this if it's wrong: I would have thought being able to communicate with Japanese companies would be very useful in that kind of career?
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    You've chosen a very misleading title for your thread.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you love and have a passion for Japan and it's language, then go for it, you can only benefit from learning another language.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Why dont you study a japanese language course most unis give this option as you seem passionate about ( i.e. i am doing a Bsc Economics course at Leicester University) but anyone is able to take up a language.This way you stay in track with your career goal but still have time to do what you find fun.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ndkathleen)
    I'm applying to SOAS this year for the degree entitled: 'Japanese and Economics'

    Will this be seen as a 'watered down' economics degree?
    In other words, would it be a no-brainer for firms to higher 'straight economics' students over me?

    I'm really not sure whether to sacrifice my 'love' (japanese) over potential career prospects (straight economics)

    I want to go into investment banking in the future. But I would also love learning Japanese. The degree involves a year in Japan too.

    Opinions please.
    I thought because it was "Japanese and Economics" this means that its joint honours so its 50-50...so rather than seeing it as a hinderance view it as gaining 2 skills instead of one it will probably be more beneficial than problematic to you!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks, I'll think about it. Maybe ask a few careers advisers and such...

    Yeah I could take up the Japanese course on its own. But then it would just be more work for me :P
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I think it would be really beneficial to do the joint honours course. You will gain a lot of invaluable skills on your year abroad, and knowing another language is a skill most employers consider extremely beneficial. I say do it!

    Otherwise, if you want to think about taking it up as a part-time thing and not as part of your course, see if your university and department allow you to take elective modules. I'm at Leeds and studying BA English but I was allowed 40 credits out of 120 credits to do anything I liked with in my 1st year, 20 credits in my 2nd year and another 20 in my 3rd year. I chose to study Italian, and if I'd stuck with that instead of choosing other additional English modules this year I imagine I'd be pretty fluent in the language by the end. See if you can do something like this? Good luck!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I'd probably see it as more desirable in a way. It means you're versatile, AND you can communicate with the Japanese market without an interpreter.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ndkathleen)
    I'm applying to SOAS this year for the degree entitled: 'Japanese and Economics'

    Will this be seen as a 'watered down' economics degree?
    In other words, would it be a no-brainer for firms to higher 'straight economics' students over me?

    I'm really not sure whether to sacrifice my 'love' (japanese) over potential career prospects (straight economics)

    I want to go into investment banking in the future. But I would also love learning Japanese. The degree involves a year in Japan too.

    Opinions please.
    Yes it will be watered down Economics. i.e. it will be half strength.
    How much an issue this is in the job market will depend on what career you go into.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ndkathleen)
    I'm applying to SOAS this year for the degree entitled: 'Japanese and Economics'

    Will this be seen as a 'watered down' economics degree?
    In other words, would it be a no-brainer for firms to higher 'straight economics' students over me?

    I'm really not sure whether to sacrifice my 'love' (japanese) over potential career prospects (straight economics)

    I want to go into investment banking in the future. But I would also love learning Japanese. The degree involves a year in Japan too.

    Opinions please.
    :sigh:

    Just do what you're interested in.

    You'll probably never have the chance/time to ever do something like this again.

    Do you really want to give an opportunity like this up for that?
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: October 12, 2009

University open days

  • Heriot-Watt University
    School of Textiles and Design Undergraduate
    Fri, 16 Nov '18
  • University of Roehampton
    All departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
  • Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.