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    i have found a few websites that may be able to help you out with the analogies in physics sectoin of phy 6

    capacitor discharge and radioactive decay - http://www.nelsonthornes.com/seconda...elds_20_29.pdf

    electric and gravitational fields - http://www.s-cool.co.uk/topic_quickl...s=&ebl=&elc=13

    springs and capacitors - http://www.s-cool.co.uk/topic_quickl...s=&ebl=&elc=13

    and this should help with teh accelerators etc - http://www.asa2physics.co.uk/pages/Unit_6_Synthesis/
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    (Original post by MrRW)
    i found this - http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/arch.../t-116999.html

    its just that it goes on to say about springs in parrallel etc which we havent leanrt about and i cant c on the syllabus but i know about capacitors is parrallel etc.

    but on the phy 6 syllabus it mentions the comparisons but focuses on energy stored and f=kx and v=Q/C
    it is on our syllabus but you may not get the questions as straight forward as that. It's still the same thing though, just make sure you get some good practice on phy6 past papers and you should be ok.
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    Learn everything we've ever done or not?
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    i dont think we need phy 3 but just baout everything else, yes.
    I am having difficulty finding info on the conervation of mass energy, if anyone has any good links please let me know

    thanks
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    You mean dE=Dmc^2?
    You dont really need to know that much.
    You should learn the structure of basic elements like helium (ie 2proton, 2neutons + 2 electons), lithium (7 nucleon number, 2 proton number) etc.
    Also, from PHY1, mass of nucleons are 1u, and electron is 1/1800u.
    You sometimes have to find the combined mass of helium atom for example, to complete the questions. so mass = 4u, and convert into kg.

    Oh yeah, when something has been SINGLY ionised it loses one electron.
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    thanks
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    all you need to know really is ΔE=Δmc^2 (not d or D this is confusing)
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    i think by the d he ment delta ( the little triangle thing meaning change in ... )
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    can someone explain how a van de graaff acelerates particles, and any thing else we need to know about them
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    How much is the synoptic paper worth as a percentage of the A level in total?
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    20%!
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Imaad)
    can someone explain how a van de graaff acelerates particles, and any thing else we need to know about them
    briefly due to friction between the roller and the belt a charge is induced the earth acts like a cathode or an anode depends on the charge induced,they are accelerated with a high pd,up to couple of mega volts (not sure),then move with the belt
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    is anyone lookin back to last years stuff (units 1 and 2) ??
    or just lookin at this years stuff for synoptic ?
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    syoptic paper is hugeeeee...80 marks! 2 hours long! boundaries r not that low (about 60 to get A although june 04 was 53!)
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    (Original post by sumitk87)
    is anyone lookin back to last years stuff (units 1 and 2) ??
    or just lookin at this years stuff for synoptic ?
    Ive been passively reading all of Unit 1 & 2, just to remind myself of the basics.
    Most of the questions are on A2 material, so you should spend more time learning this more thoroughly.
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    Im just starting on the

    6.5 priciples of linear accelerators.

    Production of MeV particles using Van De Graaf.

    My NAS book has nothing about them really. What do we keed to know about them? Just that they can produce MeV particles? Or a bit about what goes on inside the contraption? :rolleyes:
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    Can someone quickly explain fusion to me
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    (Original post by Imaad)
    Can someone quickly explain fusion to me
    This is fusion as far as I understand it...

    Fusion can only happen within stars. The temperatures at the cores of stars are so vast (up to and beyond 30,000K) that the particles within the cores become so energetic that when two or more particles are on a collision course with each other, which is extremely often, they have enough energy to get very close together, opposing the repulsion of like forces between them. If the particles get close enough together they get within range of the strong molecular force (the binding force that acts between quarks, i.e. the force that holds the nucleus together). The strong force is, as the name suggests, pretty damn strong - and the particles nuclei become fused together, creating a new, heavier particle, releasing a huge amount of energy in the process and usually chucking out a neutron or two for the fun of it. For example, within stars the 'norm' fusion reaction in stars is hydrogen gas to helium.

    Note: Gravity is not responsible for fusion. Gravity's relative strength at molecular level is near enough zero because of the infinitesimally small masses involved. The strong force has a very small range at which is has any effect - less than 10-15 m, but when particles are within that range it's actual strength is phenomenal, which also explains why it's so difficult to split particles apart and why such vast energies are released when it's managed.

    Furthermore, don't get confused with fission and fusion. Fission is what happens within nuclear reactors.
 
 
 
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