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    I actually mean what is the difference apart from the couple of colleges you have to chose from ? Is there any inside competition amongst the different colleges at a sports level? Is it more exciting to belong to a particular college rather than to the whole university like at the cetralised unis?
    Please do feel free to post your opinions /impressions / off-topics (joking ,no off-t's please)
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    I went to Lancaster, which is collegiate. I felt that the college system helped to create a better sense of community than a "normal" uni with halls of residence. The difference was not huge, as Lancaster is not one of those unis where you are taught in college.
    Because the colleges are smaller units than the whole uni, and because each one has its own social space, it is easier to get to know people and you get a better sense of belonging.
    Yes, there are inter-college sports tournaments and some college based societies for those who want them. Each college has is its own identity, logo, hoodie, scarf etc. But we were also free to use the facilities in any other college, such as bars, TV rooms, laundries etc.
    It suited me very well - the system was there if you wanted to be part of it, but you could ignore it and treat the place as a hall of residence if you preferred.
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    I love being in a collegiate uni because everything works at two layers: uni-level and college-level. This means there are far more opportunities to do stuff. Like I'm not really a good enough violinist to play in the uni orchestras (though I did manage to scrape into one ) but because there are so many college orchestras to play in, that doesn't matter. Equally, I had the chance to conduct my college orchestra whereas if I'd been at a non-collegiate uni where only the best get those kinda opportunities, I'd have never got anywhere near a conducting baton
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I love being in a collegiate uni because everything works at two layers: uni-level and college-level. This means there are far more opportunities to do stuff. Like I'm not really a good enough violinist to play in the uni orchestras (though I did manage to scrape into one ) but because there are so many college orchestras to play in, that doesn't matter. Equally, I had the chance to conduct my college orchestra whereas if I'd been at a non-collegiate uni where only the best get those kinda opportunities, I'd have never got anywhere near a conducting baton
    This, but not for music for me. :p: I think being in a college community is really good for getting to know people. :yep:
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    In Balliol, the access to support (from your mentor, college supervisor, faculty supervisor, praefectus etc) is phenomenal. The small community means you get to know people arguably quicker than when you're thrown into halls with 1,400 others. However, this is a different thing entirely to saying the quality of education and the quality of the member of staff teaching you will be superior as a result. Like anywhere, there's the possibility of getting a young post-doc (or an older and undistinguished faculty member) to teach you at Oxford, while getting a celebrated and renowned professor at Brunel. It's good in some respects, but it's not necessarily the case that you'll come out better at your chosen subject as a result.
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    Outside of Oxbridge and possibily Durham you can replace the word 'colleges' with 'halls of residence' and it would make little difference.

    Yes they have a slight social and sporting scene but they don't have any real money so the experience isn't as good as a uni with works on a more centralised basis.

    I've been to both a collegiate and non as an ungrad so speak with comparison experience.
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    (Original post by MrGumby)
    This, but not for music for me. :p: I think being in a college community is really good for getting to know people. :yep:
    Difference between saying I'm from St Aidens (college) and Westwood (halls of residence) is...? They are both communities that bring people together.

    (The names are right but two different unis!)
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    I quite like being part of a college here, and it does help you to get to know people/develop a sense of belonging quite early on. It is also good in terms of increased opportunities to get involved with sports and 'political' activities like JCRs and SU positions. There is college rivalry in relation to college nights out, sporting events [like the Carter Shield] and especially during Fresher's. And, I guess it gives you another group of people to get to know so you have those in your block/residence, then the college, your course/department, societies and the uni as a whole.

    That said, most of my friends are from other colleges that I met through my courses and obviously, between us, being in different colleges means very little.
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    I loved the idea of a collegiate university! I applied to Durham and Lancaster, which were my fave options (but ended up staying closer to home). Kent also says it's collegiate :s not sure about that!

    Anyway, I liked the feel of the friendly competition, cheering on your favourite college or the college you're in, the sports events etc. It just added way more atmosphere. Plus, you get to meet load of people in your college, where your college is instantly your shared interest so meeting people is easier.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Outside of Oxbridge and possibily Durham you can replace the word 'colleges' with 'halls of residence' and it would make little difference.
    Yes I'd say that's correct. It's difficult to say that a college has a particular spirit when, architecturally and in terms of the student intake by subject, each college seems essentially similar.

    You can feel much more of a 'collegiate rivalry' between different halls of residences than you can at some collegiate universities. Personally, I found Leicester University to be great for that- nearly all the halls of residences are in the same couple of adjoining streets in Oadby, some of an older vintage than others, and this creates quite a healthy rivalry and the halls certainly did mix with each other without ever losing their own identity.
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    (Original post by Picnic1)
    Yes I'd say that's correct. It's difficult to say that a college has a particular spirit when, architecturally and in terms of the student intake by subject, each college seems essentially similar.

    You can feel much more of a 'collegiate rivalry' between different halls of residences than you can at some collegiate universities. Personally, I found Leicester University to be great for that- nearly all the halls of residences are in the same couple of adjoining streets in Oadby, some of an older vintage than others, and this creates quite a healthy rivalry and the halls certainly did mix with each other without ever losing their own identity.
    They are more than just a hall of residence here though as you graduate with your college not your course and all the pastoral care set up is organised through the college.
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    Yes but how is that a benefit though if the pastoral care that you would have got at another university as a whole turns out to be the same or better than what you would have got at a collegiate university?
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    (Original post by Picnic1)
    Yes but how is that a benefit though if the pastoral care that you would have got at another university as a whole turns out to be the same or better than what you would have got at a collegiate university?
    I didn't say it was better or worse than anywhere else, just that it is administered differently and hence that a college is not the same as a hall of residence.
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    I think that, whether pastoral care is with a tutor at a college or a counsellor/advisor at the university as a whole, it all comes down to the quality of care given so all that needs to be asked is 'how good are the the individuals who are working at these collegiate universities?' and 'which other universities can give me that collegiate feel in a halls of residence?'

    With Oxford and Cambridge, and to some extent Durham, the sheer number of different colleges and physical and philosophical differences between them can make a difference but , if you're not planning on applying to them, I'd think of any other university that calls itself collegiate as I would any other university and judge it on other merits.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Difference between saying I'm from St Aidens (college) and Westwood (halls of residence) is...? They are both communities that bring people together.

    (The names are right but two different unis!)
    True, but I can't speak of what it's like to live in halls of residence as I've never lived in them. I did find when I visited some friends in halls that it wasn't as social as college, but then that could be due to the time I visited or some other factor. With the colleges there are college societies and sports teams which you can get involved in so there is an extra layer to the university teams/societies, but again, I don't know what it's like at uni halls. :p: Obviously at Oxford/Cambridge, where the colleges are for teaching, that makes a difference, but at Durham they just offer support, sports teams, societies, a library...so really just a glorified halls of residence. :p:
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    (Original post by affinity89)
    They are more than just a hall of residence here though as you graduate with your college not your course and all the pastoral care set up is organised through the college.
    At York you graduate with your course not college.

    At Bath pastoral care is organised by halls in the same way it is done by colleges.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    At York you graduate with your course not college.

    At Bath pastoral care is organised by halls in the same way it is done by colleges.
    Okay.

    I wonder how it works at Bath though if it is based on halls. Do people live in the same halls all the way through [which I would have thought more than unlikely]? Or do they just retain the same personal tutor etc when they move out?
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    (Original post by affinity89)
    Okay.

    I wonder how it works at Bath though if it is based on halls. Do people live in the same halls all the way through [which I would have thought more than unlikely]? Or do they just retain the same personal tutor etc when they move out?
    By 'pastorial care' I was thinking more about the teams that help you settle and and live in halls.

    Keep the same personal tutor and other tutors with the same tutor group for the duration. They aren't all from the same halls though - and a couple lived out in the first year in my group.
 
 
 
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