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interactive whiteboards / smartboards watch

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    I guess I'm a bit old-fashioned in that I think all you need to make a lesson interesting/engaging/inspiring is a blackboard, a piece of chalk, and a good teacher.

    But recently I read about interactive whiteboards, and I started to wonder...

    Do you use them? Do you think they improve or could improve lessons? (From the point of view of teachers as well as pupils.)
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    I'm not a teacher, but I frequently work in a primary school that does use them reguarly. I think one of the main benefits in a primary school is that the kids love the technology, and it allows things like handwriting lines to be put up on screen relatively easily.

    From another perspective, my school had (just about) brought them in my last years there, and I remember them being particularly useful in science, for more interactive demonstrations.

    I think you're probably right that a good teacher doesn't *need* an interactive whiteboard, but I think they can be useful tools
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    They are fantastic! You can do so many things on them and it can all be saved and used again another time. Games, videos, presentations, work examples. I use a timer (which has a pin on and a balloon getting bigger, eventually popping when time is up.) for when I want all the children to come and sit down on the carpet and they love it and it works wonders! Also great for starter/plenary activities.

    They just make teaching life much easier and much more interesting. Why settle for a normal whiteboard and pen when there is a whole world of work and fun out there to access.
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    To be honest, my experience is that they're used to show endless reams of slideshows on, which make for awfully boring lessons, although they can be handy to get pupils involved, eg annotating a picture or whatever.

    I prefer lessons with a teacher who just rambles on for an hour or so.
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    Ive worked in 3 schools primary - secondary on the I.C.T support side of things. It is not just a requirement nowa days but a necessity it seems. Most teachers cannot seem to teach without one.

    Each classroom with exception of 1% has a projector and an interactive board.
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    We have them in our school, but I don't use them - mainly because I've never been shown how to. If we had a training session where we were shown then I would consider using them as I can see how they might be effective.

    However, I'm in my second year of teaching now and so far have done quite well without. As well as using the whiteboard and textbooks, I also make sure to use other interactive techniques (such as inner/outer circle debating, using an obstacle course made in class to help with instructive writing, a word memory game and an activity on subordinate clauses that I made myself using laminated paper, and punctuation lessons using examples on pieces of paper stuck up around the room with space for students to write their own examples), external texts (such as adverts) and technology (mainly youtube, actually, but also Powerpoint very occasionally).
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    I use my IWB every day but NOT every lesson. In my experience it is great to have a break from them. I use them with powerpoints but it is for me to structure my lesson more than for the kids, and it allows you to have everything there ready rather than have to keep writing things up again. I also use them to do interactive games where the kids can come up and move stuff around, but the disadvantage of these is that only one person can touch the board at a time, so if you have a class of 30 then lots of kids will miss out.
    They ar very useful, to add variety and pace to a lesson but they should not be relied upon!
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    (Original post by BibblyBobbly)
    To be honest, my experience is that they're used to show endless reams of slideshows on, which make for awfully boring lessons, although they can be handy to get pupils involved, eg annotating a picture or whatever.
    I feel absolutely the same about powerpoint presentations. After 5 minutes I just doze off. Somehow for me a teacher/lecturer/presenter writing things down as they are developed/explored is much more engaging/keeping my attention.

    But this sounds rather good to me:

    (Original post by balloon_parade)
    They are fantastic! You can do so many things on them and it can all be saved and used again another time. Games, videos, presentations, work examples. I use a timer (which has a pin on and a balloon getting bigger, eventually popping when time is up.) for when I want all the children to come and sit down on the carpet and they love it and it works wonders! Also great for starter/plenary activities.
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    (Original post by llys)
    I feel absolutely the same about powerpoint presentations. After 5 minutes I just doze off. Somehow for me a teacher/lecturer/presenter writing things down as they are developed/explored is much more engaging/keeping my attention.

    Ah, my favourite teacher at secondary school just spent the whole hour having a conversation with the class, and I both enjoyed and understood the topic better. I also enjoyed it because he seemed to be blind to anybody throwing chemicals at each other
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    Hi, I'm a student and the main problem I have with smartboards is that they frequently don't work as they should - from being calibrated wrongly to just plain breaking down. Sometimes it isn't a problem, but I do have some teachers that rely heavily on them, and it messes up the lesson plan.

    However, I've have the experience of being taught with smartboards for a while now, back from when they were were nothing more than a glorified whiteboard to right now where there are finally some pretty nifty programmes made for them.

    I think they work best in something like maths, as there are programs that can help with the graph modules, and they've improved on making tables just roughly with your hand.

    But, like the poster above I've had to sit through some pretty boring lesson-long slideshows, where the SAME sideshow was handed out on paper anyway.

    I think the key is not to rely one one thing too heavily. I had a teacher who taught purely out of a textbook, I went home, did all the note-taking i needed to for the week so that I could sit in the lesson day-dreaming. The teachers that would just talk a whole lesson were great, but it made for some pretty bad notes as I would write down something, lose what the teacher was saying, and get lost.
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    electronic boards are perfect for lessons simply because a lot of teachers i know write extremely rough on the main board and you never knew what they were saying and with boards they can type or write or use powerpoints etc. I found power points really easy and I am more likely to remember stuff with visuals and it's the same for some kids. Why be old fashioned and use chalk which breaks all the time and too much black and white drives me insane.
 
 
 
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