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    My question for the fitness fanatics today is in regards to foot activity during the two big lifts - deadlift and squat.

    As we know, with walking, pronating the foot can lead to many lower body issues as your foot rolls in with your bodyweight collapsing in on it.

    Now i have an issue with foot pronation during the deadlift and squat. After months of back pain and sacroiliac joint pain which no osteo/chiro/physio can pinpoint the cause for, i am exploring all options of my lifting to see if that is the issue.

    Filming myself doing these lifts from behind shows some rolling in on my feet. I will deadlift with my knees slanted inwards. But what issues could this cause? What problems would there be from slanting inwards during a dead/squat. I have ran out of googling steam and can't seem to find what i'm looking for, so seek answers from you guys.

    Here is a video to demonstrate. The squat is alright, having focussed on pushing the knees outwards. But the original deadlift to get the bar over my head will show what i mean.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcxjzxTBq1c
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    Firstly your form isn't particularly good on either your squat or your DL discounting over pronation. Narrow your stance and focus on pushing your knees out to stop them caving in. Also from the looks of it you're rounding your back which does put excessive stress on your lower back and could be the cause of some of your problems. Focus on keeping your back in a neutral position, keep your chest up and out, etc.

    Overpronation can put excessive stress on the joints and connective tissue of your lower body which manifests itself in ankle, knee and hip pain. Now getting some proper shoes which suit your running/walking style (and wearing them) could to some degree correct your biomechanics and sort some of your problems. For this your best bet is to go to a podiatrist and/or a specialist running shop. It may be that you need orthotics.

    At the end of the day nobody can make an accurate diagnosis over an internet connection. If you want a diagnosis and some quality advice you're going to have to visit a decent physio and/or podiatrist if what's mentioned doesn't hit the spot.
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    What a cute barbell...
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    (Original post by SMed)
    What a cute barbell...
    Haha, i know right :P its a barbell i found knocking around to train at home with. I have a slight lordosis curve, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and some pretty bad lower back pain that i havent been given something to blame for yet.

    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Firstly your form isn't particularly good on either your squat or your DL discounting over pronation. Narrow your stance and focus on pushing your knees out to stop them caving in. Also from the looks of it you're rounding your back which does put excessive stress on your lower back and could be the cause of some of your problems. Focus on keeping your back in a neutral position, keep your chest up and out, etc.

    Overpronation can put excessive stress on the joints and connective tissue of your lower body which manifests itself in ankle, knee and hip pain. Now getting some proper shoes which suit your running/walking style (and wearing them) could to some degree correct your biomechanics and sort some of your problems. For this your best bet is to go to a podiatrist and/or a specialist running shop. It may be that you need orthotics.

    At the end of the day nobody can make an accurate diagnosis over an internet connection. If you want a diagnosis and some quality advice you're going to have to visit a decent physio and/or podiatrist if what's mentioned doesn't hit the spot.
    I'm very particular about my form. Thanks for the comments, although my lower back doesn't round, it can infact do the opposite due to my lordosis curve and often arch too much. And it is my knees caving in that pairs with my foot rolling in, which is what i was hoping to show with the video. My only question was whether anyone had any experience with feet pronating.

    I have seen a physio, osteo, chiro. The physio was useless and the other two diagnosed my SI joint dysfunction and tight lower back. Loosened me up, and are now stumped. I underwent a gait analysis at a high street running store who told me i needed mild support shoes. Orthotics are a thought i will be running through today as i see my second physio.

    I'm not looking for a diagnosis, just a bit of knowledge on the effects of rolling feet. Google fails me right now and i have no knowledge myself.
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    (Original post by Sitbh)
    I'm very particular about my form.
    It's very difficult to tell with the poor lighting and dodgy angle.

    (Original post by Sitbh)
    And it is my knees caving in that pairs with my foot rolling in, which is what i was hoping to show with the video.
    You can resist your knees caving in, pronation doesn't help. Even if you don't have pronation the resistance will cause your knees to cave in unless you actively 'push' them out.

    (Original post by Sitbh)
    My only question was whether anyone had any experience with feet pronating.
    I have severe over pronation. I find that I have to lift in pronator specific trainers and orthotics otherwise I tend to get knee pain - contrary to what some will have you believe that lifting barefoot will strengthen your feet and cure all sorts of ailments.

    (Original post by Sitbh)
    I underwent a gait analysis at a high street running store who told me i needed mild support shoes. Orthotics are a thought i will be running through today as i see my second physio.
    A podiatrist is going to be your best bet.
 
 
 
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