pina.Love
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I need advice for the A2 synoptic unit for edexcel the unseen prose section.
Thanks
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pina.Love
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Cmon someone?! There has to be a some that does eng lit?
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Miss Mary
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You should check this site, it may have what you are looking for.
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pina.Love
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Thanks Miss Mary

Can any one else link me any websites or give me tips
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Posh608
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http://www.goshen.edu/english/litanalysis.html
http://unix.cc.wmich.edu/~cooneys/tc...it.papers.html
http://www.ehow.com/how_2082878_writ...sis-paper.html
http://scweb.esuhsd.org/programs/english/analysis/
http://www.stpetershigh.org.uk/DEPAR...ommentary.html
http://www.englishessays.org.uk/how-...ysis-essay.php

I hope you find the above sites useful!
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pina.Love
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Kl thanks posh608
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infernalcradle
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since you are doing it for A level, I assume you did well at GCSE...

therefore, do the same..point, example, explain/analyse as you did for GCSE, but develop it a bit and bring in links and other stuff....don't actually do english though ....do history
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pina.Love
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(Original post by infernalcradle)
since you are doing it for A level, I assume you did well at GCSE...

therefore, do the same..point, example, explain/analyse as you did for GCSE, but develop it a bit and bring in links and other stuff....don't actually do english though ....do history
This is going to sound weird, but when it comes to analysing the set texts i find it easy. with the unseen prose I find it really difficult to analyse and I don't know how to put the argument for my essay together.
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johnw1
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(Original post by pina.Love)
This is going to sound weird, but when it comes to analysing the set texts i find it easy. with the unseen prose I find it really difficult to analyse and I don't know how to put the argument for my essay together.
Do you know what kinds of unseen texts they will give you? When I did A Level the only ones I got were for my Gothic Literature module and so it was fairly straightforward to analyse them as I just looked at their Gothic elements and discussed these... Presumably they don't just shove a piece of prose in front of you and tell you to 'analyse that'?! - That would be quite hard!
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pina.Love
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(Original post by johnw1)
Presumably they don't just shove a piece of prose in front of you and tell you to 'analyse that'?! - That would be quite hard!
lol actually yes they do it can be any piece of prose, I really don't know how to revise this module, all I have been told by my rubbish teachers is to look at structure, form and how the narrator or author conveys the message or whatever.
I find it really hard to analyse unseen prose because tbh I do not know what I am looking for.:o:
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johnw1
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(Original post by pina.Love)
lol actually yes they do it can be any piece of prose, I really don't know how to revise this module, all I have been told by my rubbish teachers is to look at structure, form and how the narrator or author conveys the message or whatever.
I find it really hard to analyse unseen prose because tbh I do not know what I am looking for.:o:
Owch! Does the question not offer any guidence at all? Otherwise I guess you could benefit from having a sort of check list to go through - e.g. what can I say about genre, narrative - tone - i.e. ironic, angry, disinterested - 1st person, third person, free indirect - verbose,flamboyant, sparse language/register, does the reader get privileged access to the characters inner thoughts or just some of them, do they use metaphors/motifs, are there any central themes/ideas.... Make a list of everything you can think of. Think about what the overall impression of the text is and then relate any points back to how they serve to achieve this effect. I suppose practice is key, go through books off your shelf and try to pick out as many points from your list and to find a way of tying them together into how they create an overall impression or style. Hope that helps a bit!

Seriously is very challenging because it is so vaugue!
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pina.Love
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(Original post by johnw1)
Owch! Does the question not offer any guidence at all? Otherwise I guess you could benefit from having a sort of check list to go through - e.g. what can I say about genre, narrative - tone - i.e. ironic, angry, disinterested - 1st person, third person, free indirect - verbose,flamboyant, sparse language/register, does the reader get privileged access to the characters inner thoughts or just some of them, do they use metaphors/motifs, are there any central themes/ideas.... Make a list of everything you can think of. Think about what the overall impression of the text is and then relate any points back to how they serve to achieve this effect. I suppose practice is key, go through books off your shelf and try to pick out as many points from your list and to find a way of tying them together into how they create an overall impression or style. Hope that helps a bit!

Seriously is very challenging because it is so vaugue!
cool thanks. Do you have anytips on how I should structure my essay after I have found all my key points?
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johnw1
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A quick browse on Google brought these up - there may be some things on these lists that will be useful:

http://www.brocku.ca/english/jlye/criticalreading.php
http://www.studentenglish.co.uk/guid...ary_prose.html
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pina.Love
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(Original post by johnw1)
A quick browse on Google brought these up - there may be some things on these lists that will be useful:

http://www.brocku.ca/english/jlye/criticalreading.php
http://www.studentenglish.co.uk/guid...ary_prose.html
Wow thanks, the first link was a real help
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johnw1
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(Original post by pina.Love)
cool thanks. Do you have anytips on how I should structure my essay after I have found all my key points?
You want to find an argument of sorts - so you start off with a brief introduction to the text in front of you - so, for example: 'This text centres on a character attempting to deal with the death of her father' - then something like 'the author employs a range of techniques in order to reveal the inner turmoil of its protagonist ' ...

So there you would have made a clear statement at the beginning of your answer and the rest will just be backing your point up - so maybe you would go on to talk about the use of stream of consciousness of the motif of darkness etc etc. The structure would be something like a paragraph on each aspect of which the first sentence would be something like 'the writer uses the motif of darkness to contribute to this impression' then the middle of the paragraph obv. looking at examples in detail then the final sentence sums it up - 'So, the repeated use of this motif clearly shows how her mind is in a place of metaphorical darkness'... (Sorry my example is a bit crap). Your conclusion as usual would just bring the strands of your essay together and restate your original assertion.
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pina.Love
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(Original post by johnw1)
You want to find an argument of sorts - so you start off with a brief introduction to the text in front of you - so, for example: 'This text centres on a character attempting to deal with the death of her father' - then something like 'the author employs a range of techniques in order to reveal the inner turmoil of its protagonist ' ...

So there you would have made a clear statement at the beginning of your answer and the rest will just be backing your point up - so maybe you would go on to talk about the use of stream of consciousness of the motif of darkness etc etc. The structure would be something like a paragraph on each aspect of which the first sentence would be something like 'the writer uses the motif of darkness to contribute to this impression' then the middle of the paragraph obv. looking at examples in detail then the final sentence sums it up - 'So, the repeated use of this motif clearly shows how her mind is in a place of metaphorical darkness'... (Sorry my example is a bit crap). Your conclusion as usual would just bring the strands of your essay together and restate your original assertion.
Omg thank you. You were so helpful, all I needed was someone to explain what I needed to do. Damn teachers:rant:. THANK YOU
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johnw1
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(Original post by pina.Love)
Omg thank you. You were so helpful, all I needed was someone to explain what I needed to do. Damn teachers:rant:. THANK YOU
Lol no worries. I just remembered a very similar essay I had to do at uni which was really hard to find a way into. But the key is definitely finding an argument/assertion to construct the essay around, then its not just a random mess of different thoughts. Best of luck!
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200428
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(Original post by johnw1)
Do you know what kinds of unseen texts they will give you? When I did A Level the only ones I got were for my Gothic Literature module and so it was fairly straightforward to analyse them as I just looked at their Gothic elements and discussed these... Presumably they don't just shove a piece of prose in front of you and tell you to 'analyse that'?! - That would be quite hard!
:lolwut:
surely it's easier to have total freedom over the way that you analyse something rather than being constrained to a specific point? I liked the general 'analyse this' questions so much more! :p:

Anyway, OP:
Firstly, read the text. What sort of prose is it? A Letter (in which case is it part of an epistolary novel?), does it include dialouge, is it a descriptive piece? Look at the provenance of it - where does it come from? Who is the author? Can you comment on this? What is the genre? Does it fit any specific generic conventions? The style - can this be commented on at all? Has the author used any literary devices? Is it written for a specific audience? Are there characters? Is there any development of characters? What's the tone of the piece/emotion associated with it?
Consider all of the above, form an argument from it. Or if there is a specific question, consider the above in relation to it.
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pina.Love
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(Original post by sadie-kiki)
:lolwut:
surely it's easier to have total freedom over the way that you analyse something rather than being constrained to a specific point? I liked the general 'analyse this' questions so much more! :p:

Anyway, OP:
Firstly, read the text. What sort of prose is it? A Letter (in which case is it part of an epistolary novel?), does it include dialouge, is it a descriptive piece? Look at the provenance of it - where does it come from? Who is the author? Can you comment on this? What is the genre? Does it fit any specific generic conventions? The style - can this be commented on at all? Has the author used any literary devices? Is it written for a specific audience? Are there characters? Is there any development of characters? What's the tone of the piece/emotion associated with it?
Consider all of the above, form an argument from it. Or if there is a specific question, consider the above in relation to it.
Thanks.
Tbh I do find unseen quite hard cos it could be any range of text. If it was a specific genre at least I know what to look for, like with gothic novels, I can comment on the type of language or pathetic fallacy :p:
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johnw1
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(Original post by sadie-kiki)
:lolwut:
surely it's easier to have total freedom over the way that you analyse something rather than being constrained to a specific point? I liked the general 'analyse this' questions so much more! :p:

Anyway, OP:
Firstly, read the text. What sort of prose is it? A Letter (in which case is it part of an epistolary novel?), does it include dialouge, is it a descriptive piece? Look at the provenance of it - where does it come from? Who is the author? Can you comment on this? What is the genre? Does it fit any specific generic conventions? The style - can this be commented on at all? Has the author used any literary devices? Is it written for a specific audience? Are there characters? Is there any development of characters? What's the tone of the piece/emotion associated with it?
Consider all of the above, form an argument from it. Or if there is a specific question, consider the above in relation to it.
Lol completely disagree! I think it's way harder to have so much freedom - with a specific question you know where you are and can focus your answer. With a vague question you have to decide where to focus first - it gets easier with practice but it's not something that comes naturally to me esp as all through education you're used to answering set questions.. Each to their own though!
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