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    I'm taking up climbing and I'm gonna need some entry-level, but preferably decent, climbing shoes. Ideally I'll need them by next weekend at the latest because I don't fancy climbing in trainers again. Where should I be looking and what for?
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    (Original post by mipegg)
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    Thanks choc.

    Depends entirely on you as a climber. Since your entry level your still looking more for comfort and foot support than a technical shoe, so Id stay away from scarpas and five tens. Are you more of a climber or a boulderer? Difference being bouldering shoes are bent down alot more to allow for more powerful use of the toe but really not designed for standing or walking or anything else climbing involves.

    At any rate look for something in the 30-50 quid range at the moment, you probably wont be able to use your shoes that well and will just trash the toes in ~a year so its not really worth spending alot of money on em. However, whilst I would recommend a shoe like: http://www.rockrun.com/products-Ozon...FT-RB-ZONE.htm for its cost, it isnt the most comfortable thing in the world and wont be fantastic fitting either. You need to get down a climbing shop with people who know what their on about and find the right make for you, IE, I had a pair of red chillis (spirit imacts, awesome shoes) but it took a long time for me feet to adjust and they never fitted quite properly because my feet just dont fit in chilli shoes, now Iv got a pair of scarpas and they fit perfectly.

    As a rule of thumb:

    Moderate side bend, small down bend will fit most entry level climbers well
    Middle-thick rubber for extra support whilst your feet are getting used to it
    Velcro or laces, I prefer velcro personally. A slip on will kill you at this stage
    Always always always try on, Iv been climbing 6 years and still have to try on every shoe.
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    I saw some in cotswold, i wanted a pair for just chillin cos they're really light n flexible
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    I've got some la sportiva cliff's they have a thick sole and feel like they'll last for a long time. Also quite comfortable.
    To be honest though you can't go wrong with mipegg's advice, you really need to get to a climbing shop to try a few different ones. The shoes vary by a lot shape-wise, the only way you can know if they will fit fine is by trying some in a store.
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    I've seen climbing shoes recommended for scrambling, what's your stance on that?

    I've certainly found that my 4 season boots don't cut it; on polished rock I struggle to get a grip and the chunky toes sometimes make footholds a bit problematic. I've been leaning towards getting a pair (perhaps next season).
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I've seen climbing shoes recommended for scrambling, what's your stance on that?

    I've certainly found that my 4 season boots don't cut it; on polished rock I struggle to get a grip and the chunky toes sometimes make footholds a bit problematic. I've been leaning towards getting a pair (perhaps next season).
    Imho, it depends. They wont be good for climbing if your going to be scrambling in them and they'd get torn to shreds on shingle etc, really your best off finding a good pair of boots and learning how to use them.

    (Original post by 7777777)
    I saw some in cotswold, i wanted a pair for just chillin cos they're really light n flexible
    Errr, no. They really really arent.

    (Original post by Diomedes)
    I've got some la sportiva cliff's they have a thick sole and feel like they'll last for a long time. .
    Total example of my point above, I HATE the fit in sportiva's, they cut my toes short and dont match the bend down in my foot properly. That and Im not a fan of thick soled shoes. Also, dont think that 'cause your a size X shoe you'll be a size X climbing shoe, it varies wildly. My shoes are 7.5 and Im 9.5
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    They all felt it in cotswold :lolwut:
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    Then they arent climbing shoes! Climbing shoes are extremely tough to bend about in, think about it. You have your whole weight on 2mm^2 at the end of your big toe some of the time, if the shoe is flexible your toes are too and its just going to bend right off. Climbing shoes are extremely supportive and not comfortable to the non climber
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I've seen climbing shoes recommended for scrambling, what's your stance on that?
    When do you say scrambling what do you mean, do you mean the kind of thing encountered whilst out walking for the day, or do you mean easy rock climbing?

    I wouldn't really want to wear climbing shoes for anything other than actually climbing - they'll slip all over the place on anything other than rock and they'll offer your feet no protection. They also hurt when worn for long periods of time.

    (Original post by 7777777)
    I saw some in cotswold, i wanted a pair for just chillin cos they're really light n flexible
    Err no... they tend to kill your feet if you're not used to them (and even if you are) when worn for long periods of time as they fit very tightly. This also means your feet sweat a lot in them. They're also useless on anything other than rock as they don't have the tread found on normal shoes, step on to wet grass and you'll slip right over.

    mipegg's point about sizes is important... they tend to make climbing shoes in half sizes which matters because the fit wants to be so tight, as does the shape the shoe is itself to begin with which is why you can find certain manufacturers just don't get on with your feet. When I got mine the guy in the shop basically made me try smaller and smaller until it became impossible to get them on!
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    When do you say scrambling what do you mean, do you mean the kind of thing encountered whilst out walking for the day, or do you mean easy rock climbing?
    "Easy rock climbing" - though it really depends on the grade.

    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    I wouldn't really want to wear climbing shoes for anything other than actually climbing - they'll slip all over the place on anything other than rock and they'll offer your feet no protection. They also hurt when worn for long periods of time.
    I was under the impression that they offered lots of grip and have seen the recommended for scramblers - meh.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    "Easy rock climbing" - though it really depends on the grade.

    I was under the impression that they offered lots of grip and have seen the recommended for scramblers - meh.
    So, sub 3 british tech stuff? You will fall straight over in rock shoes, they are designed for providing insane friction on the toes and edges with support for your foot in the middle, they are not for walking around in either in terms of your feet actually having to be in them or the grip.

    Sounds like your after some approach shoes tbh. Their more inbetween rock shoes and walking boots, designed for crawling up slippy dust embankments and walking over grimy rocks.

    http://www.rockrun.com/productlist.a...string=&brand=
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    (Original post by mipegg)
    So, sub 3 british tech stuff?
    I'm not that familiar with the grading, it's only really something I did a bit of last summer (and something which I'm almost certainly going to be doing again).

    (Original post by mipegg)
    You will fall straight over in rock shoes, they are designed for providing insane friction on the toes and edges with support for your foot in the middle, they are not for walking around in either in terms of your feet actually having to be in them or the grip.
    I'll take your word for it, personally I have heard of them being recommended but I can only guess for the much more technical and/or advanced routes with more exposure.

    (Original post by mipegg)
    Sounds like your after some approach shoes tbh. Their more inbetween rock shoes and walking boots, designed for crawling up slippy dust embankments and walking over grimy rocks.

    http://www.rockrun.com/productlist.a...string=&brand=
    It's a possibility but they don't offer that much support and stability, swings and roundabouts.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I'll take your word for it, personally I have heard of them being recommended but I can only guess for the much more technical and/or advanced routes with more exposure.

    It's a possibility but they don't offer that much support and stability, swings and roundabouts.
    Personally if I was doing it as a rock climb (drive to a crag, pick an easy route, climb up it somehow and come back down) I'd wear rock shoes because I have them anyway and I may as well because they provide extra grip on the rock, and I would be wearing them for pretty much just the climbing.

    If I was doing it as a scramble (ie. ascend a mountain via a route which requires use of my hands and some more technical moves) I would be wearing my walking boots - they're not as good for getting in the little toe-holds but are great for general walking, and doing this there is also the walk in and walk out to consider which I'd want the ankle support for. If there was something I thought the boots might not be very good for, I could choose to carry my climbing shoes in order to change into them just before the technical bits.

    Erm, what kind of scrambling is this? What grade? Roped, I assume? It all depends what you're planning on doing...
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    (Original post by thefish_uk)
    Erm, what kind of scrambling is this? What grade? Roped, I assume? It all depends what you're planning on doing...
    I've got connections in Snowdonia so I tend to go there most summers. This summer it was just grades 1-2 as none of us had any experience scrambling. The rope did come out briefly but for the majority of it it was unnecessary.
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    Having Goretex seems to be a standard amongst walkers and climbers.
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    (Original post by Snailp)
    Having Goretex seems to be a standard amongst walkers and climbers.
    Very few climbers wear Goretex at all.
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    (Original post by Snailp)
    Having Goretex seems to be a standard amongst walkers and climbers.
    It's good but works best when you're static and/or moving very slowly.

    When you're active (eg; moving over rough ground, uphill, carrying a load, etc) you produce heat and sweat at a greater rate than what the fabric can breathe, whether than be Goretex, HiVent, Paramo, etc. When that happens you end up getting just as wet inside your jacket as you are outside - in this situation all it does it help keep you windproof and reduce wind chill.
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    (Original post by Snailp)
    Having Goretex seems to be a standard amongst walkers and climbers.
    Wrong, its standard amongst walkers with far too much money to kill. Climbers all wear the same thing, knee length shorts, a vest or tshirt and a beanie. FFS, get it right!
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    Okay, so I went along to MI today for a prearranged sale with the uni mountaineering club and ended up spending close to £200 on a harness (w/ chalk bag, carabiner and belay plate), helmet and shoes. Spent a fair amount more on the shoes than I was anticipating as they didn't have the cheaper ones in my size and I was already paying when I found out that the discount doesn't apply to the shoes I was buying -_-

    Anyway, I got a pair of Scarpa Thunders, but on trying them on again at home they feel a tad small. It feels fine on most of the foot but my big toe is forced to curl down in the end quite a bit and it's pretty uncomfortable around the end. Do I just need to wear them in a bit or does it sound like they're too small?
 
 
 
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