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    People have been posting that you need critics views on this. My teacher never told me anything about this!!! What sort of stuff do you need? Any help would be appreciated!
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    She never told you anything about the need of critics even though thats the primary focus of the exam?! Jesus! Erm, look online, type in critical opinion on Othello into google, should get some decent responses.
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    Look up Bradley and Leavis. Especially Leavis, he's enjoyably *****y.
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    nope nothing! how many views should i be looking to get roughly? And also should you actually mention the critics name, or just say, that critics say this ".........." ?

    This is the AQA LTA4 exam we're talking about, yes?
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    i would help as i did Othello on my AS (AMAZING PLAY!!!) but not same exam board...in mine i don't recall putting in critics views....i just used lots of different arguments sayin " bla bla bla....on the other hand......" or " bla bla bla. However this could also be interpretted as....."
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    Well, even though the exam has gone, I didn't know that it had that assessment objective - I swear that was just the coursework and the unseen prose paper that had it; Othello had a different one about social context, I think.
    Othello had some lovely questions though - I did the one about the greatest suffering being reserved for avengers and concentrated solely on Othello, Iago and a touch of Desdemona. A truly god given set of questions.
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    I haven't been told anything about needing critics points of view, just that the question will probably contrast two critics point of views. Im confussed now :confused:
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    Just found this on the AQA website, examiners report for the last Unit 4 exam. This has confussed me even more and under the what successful candidates did bit there is no mention of using critics :confused:

    Some advice on the use of critics:
    • statements from critics should not be inserted where they interfere with the overall coherence of the argument. Examiners saw many examples of candidates using them when they were either irrelevant or without apparent point
    • whoever the critic may be, s/he still has to produce textual evidence for assertions,particularly, as is increasingly the case, interpretations are offered that seem to rely more on novelty than on scholarship or common sense. Speculation by critics is still simply speculation.
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    The focus is on 'other views or other readings'. You have to talk about what critics have said and your opinions also, using the critics to fortify your answer or create an answer.
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    If you look at the example paper for this question, which is given on the Duchess of Malfi option, but is the same unit, they make no mention of critics and still scored 20/20. I think that the use of critics can get you extra marks if you use them well, but if you show a range of opinions then you will get the marks anyway.

    Our teacher didn't give us anything on critics either, so I wouldn't freak out about it.
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    My understanding is that you need to show understanding of different interpretations and view points. We have been told it isn't always necessary to mention the names of the critics, but perhaps just say..the femenist interpretation...etc. However I have looked at the view points of Bradley, Coleridge, Leavis individually, but also know about the more recent interpretations and difference between early criticisms and ninteenth century. Early interpretations usually have racist viewpoints, there was this one woman who i read who refused to believe that Shakespeare intended Othello to be black! It is definitely worth reading the critics opinions...some of them are really interesting and give you a much wider scope of the play. I am basing my revision on reading essays about the plays!
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    (Original post by Freeway)
    People have been posting that you need critics views on this. My teacher never told me anything about this!!! What sort of stuff do you need? Any help would be appreciated!
    I'll outline some quickly to you, because to look point blank at a critical study is a bit daunting with a few days to go. I am taking AQA - A, so this syllabus might not apply to you!

    The quotations shouldn't be used as points in themselves, but to back up your own arguments and maybe further the analysis etc (this is what I've been doing and it's worked - not sure about everyone else). It seems that what the exam board are saying is don't use them just for the sake of using them; use them because they're relevant (but make sure you write something that they'll be relevant to, because you have to use them...Catch-22?!).

    - A famous one is Samuel Taylor Coleridge who believed that Iago did not have a motive for his actions. He dubbed the language Iago used to justify his actions the "motive-hunting of a motiveless malignity" (as seen in: "I hate the Moor" then "...and it's thought abroad". The use of "and" seems to be a tag line to try and justify his hatred).

    - You also have G. Wilson-Knight, who picked up on "Othello's music". This applies to the langauge Othello uses, with all its natural cadences etc.

    - Some critics argue the point that Iago is a Machiavellian criminal, pointing out that Elizabethan audiences were very much aware of this idea.

    - Two considerable debates about "Othello" are from A.C. Bradley and F.R. Leavis. Bradley saw Othello as noble, and Iago as cunning and deceptive, therefore Othello wasn't at fault for his actions. Leavis wrote a response to this, attacking the theory saying that Othello was foolish and it was his fault he fell for Iago's tricks.

    Those are just some of the debates, but there are plenty more. If you can find a revision guide for the syllabus, there may be more debates in there. All this said, I think your own perspectives/interpretations are probably more valued, so make sure you put lots in there - not at the expense of the other.

    Hope I've helped!
    Fiona
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    My teacher has just told us that we can keep throwing in "some critics have suggested that... *insert point here* " and get the marks, even if you don't know that it has been said by any critic... because at the end of the day, examiners don't know everything that everyone has ever said about Othello... she reckons we can get away with making names up for critics as well...
    You just have to show that you know that there can be different interpretations of the text.
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    thanks a lot everyone, ive picked up some good views in the criticisms section of the york notes guide to othello. cheers.
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    Are there any good websites you guys can suggest on criticisms because my google search has not been very fruitful? and my local library has absolutely nothing.
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    (Original post by Spoon)
    Are there any good websites you guys can suggest on criticisms because my google search has not been very fruitful? and my local library has absolutely nothing.
    There's a Penguin guide with lots of major criticisms. Penguin classic guides? Also, if you go to the library and look for different editions of "Othello" as a play version, if you read the introduction, they usually offer some interesting points of view.
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    lol, i make up critics too if i can't find one to match my point. I was like 'feminist critic Shelley argues that....' and my teacher was very much 'outstanding steve'. The useful one to remember is Jones, as they can't disprove it, there's bound to be some critic called Jones or Smith.
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    Since your teacher didn't tell you about the importance of critics/interpretations, you do know how important context is to the other part of the exam don't you? Just thought I'd ask because I think you'd find it difficult to get an A without it. I read one of the reports that said without the mention of context (in the Blake/wordsworth exam) its difficult to get out of band 2.
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    (Original post by t_muir11)
    Since your teacher didn't tell you about the importance of critics/interpretations, you do know how important context is to the other part of the exam don't you? Just thought I'd ask because I think you'd find it difficult to get an A without it. I read one of the reports that said without the mention of context (in the Blake/wordsworth exam) its difficult to get out of band 2.
    thanks, i know a fair bit for the blake exam, as i have a different teacher for that one, and she is a good teacher so hopefully i will be fine on that one. we hardly spent anytime on othello in my opinion, and my teacher wasnt that good anyway, but again hopefully i will be fine now, because ive learnt some criticisms now and got a lot of quotes.
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    Im on AQA and as far as I know, use of critic's opinions should only be used as part of your argument. I think the exam board want to encourage personal reaction to the text.
 
 
 
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