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50% of Medicine graduates can't get a job in the NHS? watch

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    I remember hearing about this in the news about a year or so back, but when searching for articles couldn't find anything, which makes me think it's false or inaccurate. Have I got the wrong end of the stick here, and is the title true? Do 50% of junior doctors fail to get a specialist training contract, or just the training contract they want?
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    It's not for foundation programmes (the 2 years immediately after) university, that's for sure. Whether it's true for specialty training again I don't know, and I'm unsure of the exact figures, but I'd hazard a guess it's far more likely to be that 50% (or whatever) of juniors don't get either a)a run-through specialty training post, forcing them into career dead-end jobs or b)their first choice of specialty. Maybe. Certainly it's not like there are thousands of unemployed doctors floating round the country.

    If you look up MTAS and Remedy UK you'll probably find some info.
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    Docs are probably the last people who would have to worry about employment.
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    (Original post by neodymium)
    Docs are probably the last people who would have to worry about employment.
    That's not true...there's lots of competition! :eek3:
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    but I'd hazard a guess it's far more likely to be that 50% (or whatever) of juniors don't get either a)a run-through specialty training post, forcing them into career dead-end jobs
    They should have done a proper degree, if they'd done Economics or Law they would be able to avoid the gravy train of a dead end job
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    googl MTAS, it was to do with specialist training and people having to take staff grade jobs due to a lack of training posts. However i was under the impression that you could reapply for a training post the following year so didnt really see what all the fuss was about. No doubt by the time even the current 1st year graduate the goverment will have messed with training again!
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    That's a worry stat but all degrees have a certain proportion who won't be able to work in that specific field; it comes with the territory really.
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    (Original post by Barny)
    I remember hearing about this in the news about a year or so back, but when searching for articles couldn't find anything, which makes me think it's false or inaccurate. Have I got the wrong end of the stick here, and is the title true? Do 50% of junior doctors fail to get a specialist training contract, or just the training contract they want?
    50% fail to get their first choice job in their first choice place.

    But thats no different from any other career.
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    still if you look on the bright side 50% do get there first choice job at their first choice place (provided these stats are true).
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    It's not for foundation programmes (the 2 years immediately after) university, that's for sure. Whether it's true for specialty training again I don't know, and I'm unsure of the exact figures, but I'd hazard a guess it's far more likely to be that 50% (or whatever) of juniors don't get either a)a run-through specialty training post, forcing them into career dead-end jobs or b)their first choice of specialty. Maybe. Certainly it's not like there are thousands of unemployed doctors floating round the country.

    If you look up MTAS and Remedy UK you'll probably find some info.
    It was something to do with specialist training, I remember that much, but as I say a search came up fruitless. Could you elaborate on "career dead end jobs" please? Does that mean you'll have to be a junior doctor forever, or something?
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    Take the risk.
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    I doubt the percentage is that high. There are quite a lot of hospital jobs about and Doctors have more job security than people in other careers. Everything carries a certain amount of risk.
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    Just how competetive are the specialities though? Like Cardiology for example? I would absolutly hate to want to do cardiology and be forced into either continuing to work as a SHO for X amount of years continually applying for placements and end up being forced into nephrology or something since it was the only place I could get training.
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    Just how competetive are the specialities though? Like Cardiology for example? I would absolutly hate to want to do cardiology and be forced into either continuing to work as a SHO for X amount of years continually applying for placements and end up being forced into nephrology or something since it was the only place I could get training.
    looky here: speciality training competition. This is from the mmc website.
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    (Original post by trektor)
    looky here: speciality training competition. This is from the mmc website.
    How many applications do people typically make? The raw total applicants/place calculation gives a scarily high figure.
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    (Original post by trektor)
    looky here: speciality training competition. This is from the mmc website.
    I thought there were far more than that many specialities o.o
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    I thought there were far more than that many specialities o.o
    I think the text says at the initial speciality training stage so the number could increase as you progress? That was the only link I found through the FAQ section
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    (Original post by RollerBall)
    I thought there were far more than that many specialities o.o
    "Core Medical Training" is shared training for people who want to cardiologists, nephrologists, etc. etc.
    Similarly "Surgery in general" covers nearly all the surgical specialties, and the "Acute Care Common Stem" is a way into intensive care, emergency medicine, A&E or general medicine.
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    dems iz good oddz :teeth:
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    (Original post by Barny)
    It was something to do with specialist training, I remember that much, but as I say a search came up fruitless. Could you elaborate on "career dead end jobs" please? Does that mean you'll have to be a junior doctor forever, or something?
    Basically, assuming you want to be a consultant (we'll exclude GPs from the equation to avoid confusion) in the end, you need to get a run-through training post, which will last 5-8 years (depending on specialty) and at the end you will get a Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training (CCST) which entitles you to apply for consultant posts.

    If you DON'T get a run-through job, you usually get what used to be called "staff grade" or "trust grade" jobs. They usually work either at senior SHO or registrar level (i.e. middle grade), so have a reasonable amount of responsibility, and if they're in surgery can operate by themselves for simple cases depending on their experience, but as they don't have a training post, they are not making progress towards a CCST. They also tend to be less well-paid than training grades. It IS possible to build up a career portfolio and get out of this and onto a training job, but it's hard. They're trying to make it easier to get back on the training ladder/harder to get stuck off it, but it is still far from guaranteed that you'll get a post that will lead you right through up to consultant level. I presume there are some people who like it - there are quite a lot in A&E for example, who get to do lots of "fun" stuff all day but without the paperwork and tedium (and £££) of being a consultant.
 
 
 
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