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    Due to arriving to the UK around year 9 with no english, my GCSE's had to suffer . I managed to get 5 A*, 2 A's, 5 B's and 4 C's. In my A-levels (German, English, Sociology and Psychology) I achieved AACC which is not that great either.

    I'm retaking the two C's now in the hope of getting into a good uni to study a Law degree e.g. SOAS, QMUL, City etc. I've been thinking about the idea of taking the LNAT and applying to either UCL or KCL.

    Am I crazy to do the LNAT and is it just a waste of time or should I at least give it a try? :confused:
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    (Original post by blueocean05)
    Due to arriving to the UK around year 9 with no english, my GCSE's had to suffer . I managed to get 5 A*, 2 A's, 5 B's and 4 C's. In my A-levels (German, English, Sociology and Psychology) I achieved AACC which is not that great either.

    I'm retaking the two C's now in the hope of getting into a good uni to study a Law degree e.g. SOAS, QMUL, City etc. I've been thinking about the idea of taking the LNAT and applying to either UCL or KCL.

    Am I crazy to do the LNAT and is it just a waste of time or should I at least give it a try? :confused:
    How good is your English?

    I don't mean in terms of speaking to people, but do you understand the precise meanings of words? Apparently, the LNAT's heavily based on interpreting passages of text, so you might struggle. If you can afford the £40 and are willing to work hard to pass, you might as well try, but don't get your hopes up. Apparently the "Mastering the LNAT" book by Mark Shepherd prepares you really well.
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    OP you managed to get 5A*s with bad english? Damn your smart

    If you really want to do law you def SHOULD do the LNAT. You know you are capable you got 2 As for A-level ffs.

    Dude you know you can do it
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    (Original post by Muppety_Kid)
    Apparently the "Mastering the LNAT" book by Mark Shepherd prepares you really well.
    PLEASE don't listen to this. THe book is a load of **** designed to capitalise on panicking students.

    The LNAT is an APTITUDE test. You'll either be good at it, or you won't. I got 22 and 24 without ever 'revising' or preparing.
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    (Original post by Muppety_Kid)
    How good is your English?

    I don't mean in terms of speaking to people, but do you understand the precise meanings of words? Apparently, the LNAT's heavily based on interpreting passages of text, so you might struggle. If you can afford the £40 and are willing to work hard to pass, you might as well try, but don't get your hopes up. Apparently the "Mastering the LNAT" book by Mark Shepherd prepares you really well.
    Thanks for the reply I'm willing to work hard although I know the LNAT is difficult. I'm very competitive :yes: and I hope that this (combined with a lot of practice) will help me get a good score. After re-reading my own post I can tell that I sound like a weak candidate but I have the passion and interest in law.

    Also, you're asking how good my understanding of english is? I think I gained little practice in interpreting text by doing my English A level and it seems quite difficult. I still want to do the LNAT though
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    If you're applying to UCL or KCL like you said in your first post, you will need to have been predicted AAA for A2. By all means do the LNAT, but it is a waste of time if you haven't got/been predicted AAA. Kings also ask for a B as AS.

    If you got an A in English A-level you should be fine in terms of understanding. Most people even with English as their first language don't achieve that!
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    (Original post by Danny_777)
    PLEASE don't listen to this. THe book is a load of **** designed to capitalise on panicking students.

    The LNAT is an APTITUDE test. You'll either be good at it, or you won't. I got 22 and 24 without ever 'revising' or preparing.
    I did say "apparently".

    In another thread, I had three people quote me saying that it over-prepares you and has at least five practice papers in, which makes it well worth considering.

    I accept that I failed to mention before (due to being in a rush) that the book is £25, but if you can get it through your local library, there's a significant difference in price (no library in my area has it, so they're charging me about £4 to order it in). However, OP's college may well have a copy.

    As for your score, well done. But for those who aren't good at it, it's definitely worth putting in extra preparatory work to try and get up to standard, especially since the exam is very like AS Critical Thinking (which I suspect OP won't have studied).
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    (Original post by Muppety_Kid)
    I did say "apparently".

    In another thread, I had three people quote me saying that it over-prepares you and has at least five practice papers in, which makes it well worth considering.

    I accept that I failed to mention before (due to being in a rush) that the book is £25, but if you can get it through your local library, there's a significant difference in price (no library in my area has it, so they're charging me about £4 to order it in). However, OP's college may well have a copy.

    As for your score, well done. But for those who aren't good at it, it's definitely worth putting in extra preparatory work to try and get up to standard, especially since the exam is very like AS Critical Thinking (which I suspect OP won't have studied).

    You can't "get up to standard". It's an APTITUDE test. You are either good enough, or you aren't. It doesn't test whether you're good at doing the LNAT, it tests skills like attention to detail, perception, etc. You either have these skills or you don't.

    It's like revising for a sight test with those letters on a board. Practice won't improve your sight.
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    (Original post by Danny_777)
    You can't "get up to standard". It's an APTITUDE test. You are either good enough, or you aren't. It doesn't test whether you're good at doing the LNAT, it tests skills like attention to detail, perception, etc. You either have these skills or you don't.

    It's like revising for a sight test with those letters on a board. Practice won't improve your sight.
    I don't think that those are analogous, but I'll save my critical analysis for the LNAT. :yes:
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    Well, my scores have improved by doing practice papers, and perhaps more importantly I feel more confident about it now.
    Mark Shepherd helped me. :awesome:
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    (Original post by Danny_777)
    You can't "get up to standard". It's an APTITUDE test. You are either good enough, or you aren't. It doesn't test whether you're good at doing the LNAT, it tests skills like attention to detail, perception, etc. You either have these skills or you don't.

    It's like revising for a sight test with those letters on a board. Practice won't improve your sight.
    I'm sorry, but this simply isn't true. You may not be able to prepare for the actual logic portion of the test (though frankly I'd contest that; practise has made me better at the one type of LNAT question I previously failed to get right most of the time), but you most definitely can prepare for the administration. Time management is something that will improve with practise, as will proper use of extra tools like the whiteboard for note-taking.
 
 
 
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