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    Was mulling over something- Why do politicians who have professional credentials, eg they have worked in westminster for years, get no deference to their experience/expertise? People would not dream of having such disrespect for the wisdom (in their subject)of their local high court judge or neurosurgeon, in fact these people would recieve considerable deference, so why do politicians views get so blatantly disrespected, and why does joe public hold such strong convictions in politics when they would never do so in, eg, law or medicine...why is there not more deference to political "status",or experience? Is journalism a cause?
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    (Original post by naivesincerity)
    I'm intrigued....was mulling over something- Why do politicians who have professional credentials, eg they have worked in westminster for years, get no deference to their experience/expertise? People would not dream of having such disrespect for the wisdom (in their subject)of their local high court judge or neurosurgeon, in fact these people would recieve considerable deference, so why do politicians views get so blatantly disrespected, and why does joe public hold such strong convictions in politics when they would never do so in, eg, law or medicine...why is there not more deference to political "status",or experience? Is journalism a cause?
    I would say the media in general.
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    (Original post by zaf1986)
    I would say the media in general.
    I'm not sure that most people wouldn't defer to their greater knowledge of political matters, the lack of respect is more about us doubting their honour and intentions, and whom they really serve.
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    (Original post by ArthurOliver)
    I'm not sure that most people wouldn't defer to their greater knowledge of political matters, the lack of respect is more about us doubting their honour and intentions, and whom they really serve.
    In which the media plays a huge role. I'm not saying we wouldn't doubt them otherwise, but the media has a big influence in the way we think, probably more than we think to have.
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    I'm not sure. The obvious comment to make would be that Politics plays a large part in how our day to day lives are run. But then again, so do law and medicine. However, it is politics that influences law and medicine, to a large extent, so I think people feel the need to get involved because of this.
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    (Original post by zaf1986)
    In which the media plays a huge role. I'm not saying we wouldn't doubt them otherwise, but the media has a big influence in the way we think, probably more than we think to have.
    I think that's true, zaf, and a large proportion of media coverage is rightly sceptical of every institution, but the media also encourage us to take politics and politicians seriously and to value our votes, don't they? [Within a very limited acceptable political spectrum - KEY!]
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    (Original post by ArthurOliver)
    I think that's true, zaf, and a large proportion of media coverage is rightly sceptical of every institution, but the media also encourage us to take politics and politicians seriously and to value our votes, don't they? [Within a very limited acceptable political spectrum - KEY!]
    Depends on the time of media.

    If you read the Sun, then no.
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    People have thrown rotten fruit at politicians since before the printing press. You can hardly blame the Sun.

    When you try and imagine a politician in your head, you most likely think of a well-spoken, haughty, smart person who doesn't have much in common with the people he/she represents, someone who has such a phobia of getting into trouble by answering a question wrong, they can't give a straight answer. Remarkably, most of them are like that, since they're the kind of skills necessary for success.
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    (Original post by JonD)
    People have thrown rotten fruit at politicians since before the printing press. You can hardly blame the Sun.

    When you try and imagine a politician in your head, you most likely think of a well-spoken, haughty, smart person who doesn't have much in common with the people he/she represents, someone who has such a phobia of getting into trouble by answering a question wrong, they can't give a straight answer. Remarkably, most of them are like that, since they're the kind of skills necessary for success.
    I'm not sure that quite answers the question of why they are not credited with expertise or sound judgement as much as other professions..and have the aforementioned "skills" always been the kind required for political success? Is that level of cynicism appropriate? Are you saying there is no political conviction/philosophy/conscience in politicians, merely a careerist outlook? If so, why should this be different in other professions? And why should, eg, a barrister or surgeon have anything more in common with those they represent?
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    (Original post by naivesincerity)
    I'm not sure that quite answers the question of why they are not credited with expertise or sound judgement as much as other professions..and have the aforementioned "skills" always been the kind required for political success? Is that level of cynicism appropriate? Are you saying there is no political conviction/philosophy/conscience in politicians, merely a careerist outlook? If so, why should this be different in other professions? And why should, eg, a barrister or surgeon have anything more in common with those they represent?
    Oh they are credited with expertise, but in the skills previously mentioned - Doctors save lives, Politicians tell lies. If by "careerist" you mean selfish conquest for a more powerful job, I don't think so, few people elect others purely based on the previous skills, and most politicians genuinely want to represent their constituants. I think while we mainly elect for philosophy, we only remember them fiddling with our lives; boasting when it goes right (so they'll get reelected) and making excuses when it goes wrong (so they'll get reelected).

    For example, compare the recent "Political Orientation" thread to the "Thatcher" thread: the former had an overwhelming number of people supporting economic liberalisation, while the latter pretty equal between the old socialist way and the new Thatcher way. Interestingly, the justification was usually something along the lines of "she was too harsh": She ran out of excuses justifying the bad things that came about by implementing her philosophy (good things), and that's what most people remember - they don't consider that the alternative had Britain titled the "Sick Man of Europe"; as the first first world country slowly reverting to third world conditions - all in the name of some long-discredited ideology, which the poll voters don't even like.
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    If politicians and politics were more transparent and they told the truth more, people would respect them and give them credit. I think that's why people have gone away from the main two parties and moved to other alternatives. Note the victories of Peter Law in Blaenau Gwent, Galloway in Bethnal Green, and the doctor bloke in Kidderminster. I think people are seeing the government, the organisation that plays a major role in their lives, being too far way from them. It seems that the government, and political parties, only care about the views of the people they are supposed to represent when there's an election.

    It could be argued that the media do promote and symbolise our lack of deference to politicians, but the advantages of their probing approach is better than the media in many other European countries. I'd rather have our investigative political journalism, than the type of political journalism practiced in France or Germany. For example, the Times publishing the fabled "Downing Street Memo", showed the world that the Iraq war had been planned in months in advance, and displayed that the actions of the American & British governments were dishonest.
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    (Original post by FarnhamBoy)
    It could be argued that the media do promote and symbolise our lack of deference to politicians, but the advantages of their probing approach is better than the media in many other European countries. I'd rather have our investigative political journalism, than the type of political journalism practiced in France or Germany. For example, the Times publishing the fabled "Downing Street Memo", showed the world that the Iraq war had been planned in months in advance, and displayed that the actions of the American & British governments were dishonest.
    But, returning to the same point, there is never the sheer degree/amount of cynicism and probing, investigative journalism into corrupt people in other socially important professions.....
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    any more thoughts......?
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    (Original post by naivesincerity)
    any more thoughts......?
    They attract so little respect and deference because they are less trustworthy than used car salesmen.
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    I think its very naive to assume people elect their local MP on what they will do for they're constituancy specifically (although there are obviously some exceptions when you often have succesful single-pledge candidates, such as Kidderminster Hospital.etc.). The majority of people vote according to overall party pledges and politics, therefore resulting in the party being able to slot in any candidates they really want to get into parliament - despite they're credentials - into socalled "safe seats". This is what the Labour party attempted to do in Blanaeu Gwent, where they presented the local labour party with a list of five females, none of whom lived in the constituancy, and also not including their current MP, Peter Law, who is extremely popular in the area. As a result, Law stood as an independant candidate and was victorious - Therefore, the only time individual politics significantly effects an election result in a constituency is when there is a high profile event such that it gains significant coverage to distract local attention from overall party politics - which the parties attempt to be all covering, so they "professionals" can overcome the so-called "gaffs" of more junior ministers.
    Although...looking at what that prat john prescott sticking 2 fingers up at the opposition in the house, the disgraceful behaviour of some does not fit our ideal stereotype of an able politician.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4124328.stm
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    (Original post by bikerx23)
    Although...looking at what that prat john prescott sticking 2 fingers up at the opposition in the house, the disgraceful behaviour of some does not fit our ideal stereotype of an able politician.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4124328.stm
    Oh come on, thats just an honest way of saying what they all do in more caniving(and often far more unpleasant) ways...More "stupid" than "disgraceful" behaviour imo
 
 
 
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