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    Hi Studentroom,

    I would like to study economics and Russian. There are many unis which offer that, like UCL, Nottingham, Bath … But why doesn’t Cambridge have such a course? Or in general terms: why does Cambridge only offer rigid courses of study? I checked the prospectus and the internet and I realized that one can only choose “one” subject. Is it possible to combine different subjects? I know that Cambridge has their Tripos system, but that doesn’t count. I would like to study Russian as a subsidiary subject, not as a Major for one year…. :confused:
    Please help me out; maybe I just oversaw something… :eek:

    Thx
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    Tripos system.

    Welllll Cambridge just has an ancient system, and that's how it is. If you would like to study russian along side economics, the best thing to do at Cambridge would be to take economics and study russian intensively at the language centre, whilst joining the russian society.
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    It's not yet possible to take 2 subjects because it would be such an incredible amount of work. Perhaps it will be happen in the future (as it has at Oxford), but people taking joint honours degrees tend to find that their workload is heavier than those taking single honours degrees, and when the workload is as heavy as it is in Cambridge this is a crucial thing to consider.

    I'm not sure it's possible to swap from MML to Economics or vice versa through the tripos system because I would imagine that both degrees are quite difficult to get into at Part 2 without previous knowledge. It can and does happen with other subjects, however.

    If you want to study Economics you could take a Russian course through the language centre and get a diploma.
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    (Original post by Ticki)
    I'm not sure it's possible to swap from MML to Economics or vice versa through the tripos system because I would imagine that both degrees are quite difficult to get into at Part 2 without previous knowledge.
    In that case you would simply take a second Part I, which is enough to qualify for a BA. From the MML Web site:

    However, since the Cambridge Tripos system is an essentially modular one, it is possible, with the agreement of your College, to take one or two years of Modern Languages and to follow this with a Part I or a Part II in another Tripos course (subject to certain regulations which your College can advise you about). You should check beforehand the attitude of the College to which you apply to such a combined course. Remember too that the year abroad is an integral part of Part II Modern Languages, and that it is not normally possible to go abroad if you change course after Part IB.
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    (Original post by testa)
    Hi Studentroom,
    ...why does Cambridge only offer rigid courses of study?I know that Cambridge has their Tripos system, but that doesn’t count.

    Well it does count: that is why the Cambridge system is not 'rigid'. It is simply flexible in a way that differs from most other universities. If you don't like the modular system, perhaps Cambridge is not for you.
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    (Original post by homoterror)
    Tripos system.

    Welllll Cambridge just has an ancient system, and that's how it is.
    I hope Cambridge’s ancient system won’t become dilapidated in the course of time. Nowadays versatility is more important than profundity. Nowadays you need to adapt to different circumstances rapidly, you need to speak several languages and you need to have a wide knowledge…


    If you want to study Economics you could take a Russian course through the language centre and get a diploma.
    As for the Language Centre: how long do these degrees take? And how intense are they?

    Do you think it's too intense to study a language on the side?
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    (Original post by testa)

    As for the Language Centre: how long do these degrees take? And how intense are they? Is there a website?

    Do you think it's too intense to study a language on the side?

    http://www.langcen.cam.ac.uk/

    They aren't degrees; they're taught courses over two terms. For basic Russian it's fourteen one-hour classes in Michaelmas; sixteen in Lent. It can be quite a significant drain on your time.
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    (Original post by testa)
    I hope Cambridge’s ancient system won’t become dilapidated in the course of time. Nowadays versatility is more important than profundity. Nowadays you need to adapt to different circumstances rapidly, you need to speak several languages and you need to have a wide knowledge…
    I have the feeling the tripos wasn't designed with maximum utility/employability in mind =P It's an academic institution and I think directors of study would only be happy if all students at Cambridge were studying their subject 14 hours a day everyday.


    As for the Language Centre: how long do these degrees take? And how intense are they? Is there a website?

    Do you think it's too intense to study a language on the side?
    http://www.langcen.cam.ac.uk/
    I'm not sure about the details, best look on the website.

    If you were to study a language on the side this would probably be a majority of your extra curricular activity. I don't think you could then go joining the boat club, your college JCR, the may ball committee, drama ... etc.
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    (Original post by svidrigailov)
    http://www.langcen.cam.ac.uk/

    They aren't degrees; they're taught courses over two terms. For basic Russian it's fourteen one-hour classes in Michaelmas; sixteen in Lent. It can be quite a significant drain on your time.
    Are they competitive to get into as well? Is there a quota and no so guarantee of being able to get on?

    All I know in Ox the same courses are massively over-subscribed
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    (Original post by RichE)
    Are they competitive to get into as well? Is there a quota and no so guarantee of being able to get on?

    All I know in Ox the same courses are massively over-subscribed

    Priority in the case of Russian is given to scientists; some courses are oversubscribed, but it's hard to generalize.
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    Thanks for your answers.

    I've checked out the website and I read that places are primarily given to scientists. My question was: Why? What's the point? Economists and businessmen are the ones who should be versatile in this point... What’s the point of speaking different languages in a laboratory? A businessman needs to acquire contacts from different nationalities…

    I don’t get the point. Please help me out.
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    (Original post by testa)
    Thanks for your answers.

    I've checked out the website and I read that places are primarily given to scientists. My question was: Why? What's the point? Economists and businessmen are the ones who should be versatile in this point... What’s the point of speaking different languages in a laboratory? A businessman needs to acquire contacts from different nationalities…

    I don’t get the point. Please help me out.

    The Web site specifically says:

    A.J. Pressland Fund courses for scientists and others have been offered for a number of years.

    In his bequest, A.J. Pressland expressed the wish

    "That my bequest to the University may be used to provide instruction in modern languages to science and medical students."


    Accordingly, priority is given students from departments within the Schools of Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Technology, but all members of the University may apply.

    The courses are free of charge and the languages offered vary from year to year. In recent years courses have been available at Basic, Intermediate or Advanced levels in French, German, Russian, and Japanese.
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    (Original post by testa)
    Thanks for your answers.

    I've checked out the website and I read that places are primarily given to scientists. My question was: Why? What's the point? Economists and businessmen are the ones who should be versatile in this point... What’s the point of speaking different languages in a laboratory? A businessman needs to acquire contacts from different nationalities…

    I don’t get the point. Please help me out.
    Russian, to some extent, is considered a useful second language for scientists - for the papers they have to read

    A century ago it was german, until the eighties probably russian, and who knows what next with China sure to become more influential
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    Why don't you try out Russian for a year or 2; see whether or not you miss economics and can continue Russian in your own spare time, in which case you switch to eco. I am sure it can be done.
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    Am I the only one thinking a course in English might be in order?
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    Whats the need, we're English :p:
    only joking.

    A course in French would be more useful would it not?
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    I know this is slightly off topic but is there anywhere in Cambridge where you can learn Latin? I've always wanted to study it but the language centre seems only to do modern languages.
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    You may be able to do it at one of the non-university-associated colleges. Might be too much investment, though.

    For anyone interested in French, there's an active branch of the AF in Cambridge.
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    I was thinking the same thing, sugarplumc, but I know that my boyfriend started studying Latin this year... I think it was organised by the History faculty though. So I think so, but I'm not sure. :P
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    I don't think cambridge degrees are rigid at all. if anything, they are often too rigid in forcing you to be flexible, prime example being the natsci course. Some triposes have the option of taking a MFL or Latin as well, I only know about English and History doing this but there could be more. At the end of the day, no university is able to offer every course in every combination and teach them all to a high standard.
 
 
 
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