Questions for law people Watch

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Ciari
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#1
Report Thread starter 13 years ago
#1
When you guys are talking about applying for US firms, (I pressume you mean United States?) and also, does this mean that its a US firm in the UK, or a US firm in ...the US?

And one more things; if it is ia US firm in the US, how does your LLB qualify you to become a lawyer in the US? Reason i ask is becuase isn't a LLB english law, whereas if you practice law in the US you'l need to know US law?

So can somone just clear up these for me, thanks.
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Phonicsdude
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#2
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You can work in the US for a US firm as a specialist in UK law. Many of these firms will have british clients, or need to resolve disputes in Britain.

Most people would work for a US firm in the UK though...

If you want to practice in the US you would need a qualifying law degree in American law..
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Ciari
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#3
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#3
thanks for that
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Howard
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#4
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(Original post by Phonicsdude)
If you want to practice in the US you would need a qualifying law degree in American law..
A JD.
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L i b
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#5
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Thanks to the British Empire, American law isn't that far removed from English Law. Certainly it's closer than English Law is to Scots Law, or American Law is to the Civil law they use in French North America (ie, Quebec or Louisiana)
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Sleep
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#6
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#6
... But it is still very different to American law.
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