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    Random topic but...

    I recently discovered to my great surprise that there were THREE types of gaelic - The Irish kind, the Scottish kind and the Manx kind! Out of pure curiosity does anyone speak these.. and if you do, can you understand the other types of gaelic?
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    Don't know what Manx is but there are French types of Gaelic too.
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    (Original post by ModernHippie)
    Don't know what Manx is but there are French types of Gaelic too.
    :fisheye: really?!! I thought that was Gall-ic! lol? i dunno!
    Manx is a language that was only spoken on the Isle of Man! I was pretty surprised to find out that such a tiny place had their own language, but there ya go!
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    (Original post by tweetsy85)
    Manx is a language that was only spoken on the Isle of Man! I was pretty surprised to find out that such a tiny place had their own language, but there ya go!
    Cool, learnt yet sth new who said the internet made kids stupid... Like in the Netherlands, in Friesland. They're only a county but the accent is officially recognised as a language. :confused:
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    (Original post by ModernHippie)
    Like in the Netherlands, in Friesland. They're only a county but the accent is officially recognised as a language. :confused:
    ehhh? :confused: lol
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    (Original post by tweetsy85)
    Random topic but...

    I recently discovered to my great surprise that there were THREE types of gaelic - The Irish kind, the Scottish kind and the Manx kind! Out of pure curiosity does anyone speak these.. and if you do, can you understand the other types of gaelic?
    Yes I found that out a little while ago myself! I don't speak any but I would love to
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    (Original post by tweetsy85)
    ehhh? :confused: lol
    LOL don't worry about it.
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    (Original post by tweetsy85)
    Random topic but...

    I recently discovered to my great surprise that there were THREE types of gaelic - The Irish kind, the Scottish kind and the Manx kind! Out of pure curiosity does anyone speak these.. and if you do, can you understand the other types of gaelic?

    That's not quite right. Basically these are all examples of Celtic languages. There are two main subfamilies of Celtic language: the Continental and the Insular. The Continental varieties were spoken by the people anciently known as the 'keltoi', who lived in Gaul, Iberia, and places like that. The Insular is divided into Goidelic and British (or Brythonic); Irish is the main Goidelic language, from which Scottish Gaelic and Manx derived through colonization; the British includes Breton, Cornish, Cumbric, &c. The differences between, say, Scottish Gaelic and Irish are no more pronounced than that between standard German and Swiss dialects, so they should be more or less mutually comprehensible.
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    (Original post by ModernHippie)
    They're only a county but the accent is officially recognised as a language. :confused:

    I don't think you mean accent. Frisian is a West-Germanic language, like old English, in fact it's the closest relative of English. It used to be spoken over quite a wide area; but now it's spoken in only three relatively small areas in the Netherlands, Germany, and a group of islands.
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    ahh thanks for that svidrigailov
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    I did Irish for the first three years of Grammar School - I live in Northern Ireland am a Catholic and attend a Chrisitain Brother's school, so it's a pretty Irish/Nationalist environment. Could do you a wee bit -

    Is mise Woodsy (my name is Woodsy)
    Ta me a me chonai a rhin mhic giolla rhua (I live in Warrenpoint)

    my brain was working overload to remember those, if i took my time could probably do more. Typical Irish greeting - Cead Mile Failte (a hundred thousand welcomes)

    Yeh there is a lot of gaelic languages - Cornish as well? Then there is the french, usually from Britanny and of course Welsh (slightly more related to Cornish) and Scottish (v. similar to Irish - and isn't there 2 forms of 'scottish') lol
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    (Original post by tweetsy85)
    Random topic but...

    I recently discovered to my great surprise that there were THREE types of gaelic - The Irish kind, the Scottish kind and the Manx kind! Out of pure curiosity does anyone speak these.. and if you do, can you understand the other types of gaelic?
    Hehe, cool thread! Now this is what I like about TSR, you wouldn't find threads like these at my uni forums lolol :p:

    Umm... I have a friend from Wales (who lives with us in Australia now) who might know a bit of the native Welsh language, but I'm not sure if that's Gaelic?? :confused:
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    My mums scottish, so she pretty much speaks gaelic fluently as she learnt it at school. I know a few words, but don't speak it (i'm english).

    The irish and scottish even pronounce the word 'gaelic' in different ways. Irish is 'Gay-lic' whereas the scottish call it 'Ga-lic'
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    (Original post by svidrigailov)
    I don't think you mean accent. Frisian is a West-Germanic language, like old English, in fact it's the closest relative of English. It used to be spoken over quite a wide area; but now it's spoken in only three relatively small areas in the Netherlands, Germany, and a group of islands.
    In Germany too?? Cool cool *keeps learning new things* It's very understandable though it's basically just like Dutch but with some English and German influence. But yeah I guess you could say it's the closest to English (although I'd say that would be French).
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    my uncles were famous gaelic footballers
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    I speak the Scottish variety. I can read a wee bit of the Irish kind and if i concentrate very hard i can just about make out some of what is written in Manx.
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    (Original post by ModernHippie)
    there are French types of Gaelic too.
    No there arent. France does have a Celtic language however which is Breton and is part of the same sub grouping of the celtic family as Welsh and Cornish which are collectively referred to as P-Celtic or Brythonic/Brittonic Celtic while Irish,Scottish and Manx Gaelic are all Q-Celtic or Goidelic Celtic.
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    (Original post by svidrigailov)
    The differences between, say, Scottish Gaelic and Irish are no more pronounced than that between standard German and Swiss dialects, so they should be more or less mutually comprehensible.
    Im very sorry to say this isnt true although i dearly wish it was.
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    (Original post by Woodsy)
    Scottish (v. similar to Irish - and isn't there 2 forms of 'scottish') lol
    There used to be various forms of Scottish just as there were with Irish although theyve mostly died out. Galloway had a dialect which was quite distinct from the rest of Scotland if i remember rightly and was quite closely related to the gaelic they spoke in Ulster - which was closer to Scottish than Irish gaelic i think i recall reading.
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    (Original post by danni_bella83)
    Umm... I have a friend from Wales (who lives with us in Australia now) who might know a bit of the native Welsh language, but I'm not sure if that's Gaelic?? :confused:
    Gaelic and Welsh share syntax and some vocabulary but theyre nowhere near mutually comprehensible and havent been for thousands of years.

    Some similiar words from each:

    Black - Dubh( gaelic) Du (Welsh)
    Rock - Creag (gaelic) Carreg (Welsh)
    Big/Great - Mor (Gaelic) Mawr (Welsh)
    Son - Mac (Gaelic) Map/Mab (Welsh)
    Four - Ceithir (Gaelic) Pedwar (Welsh ) though youd need to know how theyre both pronounced to see any similiarity with that one.
    English - Sassanach (Gaelic) Sassaneg (Welsh)
 
 
 
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