Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    14
    Classic FM's Hall of Fame 2006 countdown was poor Sorry, but you cannot put Williams The Lark Ascending 220 places above Appassionata Sonata or Hungarian Rhapsody 2!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I listened to some Monteverdi this morning. I like
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    Welcome

    A few members have expressed a desire for a haven to talk about classical music - from traditional, film, baroque to contemporary. All classical music discussion is welcome here

    So I'm your founder. I'm Mike. I like all sorts of classical, but generally I prefer more tonal/melodic stuff. I totally love JS Bach, Mozart, Beethoven (no kidding), Tchaikovsky, Chopin, Holst and Haydn to name a few! I've recently started getting into film music too which I'm sure I can learn more about from others in this here society

    See attachment for my proposed logo :cool: I originally had something more complex but it really didn't work when shrunk, so I opted for something simple yet powerful: a quaver

    Note: I am aware of the existance of the UKL Music Society, but this seems to be more for music students and it's still lurking about in the academic subforums.

    Note #2: I've closed my film music society thread upon creation of this one

    Note #3: No need for a member list. If you're a tr00 member it'll show up under 'My Societies'!
    Anyone who likes classical music is sad!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    To the contrary, we are cooler than you will ever be.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angelil)
    To the contrary, we are cooler than you will ever be.
    I like music that takes it's influences from classical music, but Bach and Chopin is too old fashioned for me, Enya is more my kind of classical music.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Enya's new age, not classical. And there's more to classical music than Bach and Chopin.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not too keen on Monteverdi.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Here is a question I posted in the music section. It failed dismally (7 views and 0 replies ). Maybe it will have more success here....
    Hello all,
    Was wondering if any of you know Veljo Tormis, a XXth century Estonian composer (still active) who basically bases his choir music on millenia-old traditional Estoniain chants ("regilauks") that are still sung in Estonia. His music is fascinating, typically Baltic in character I would say. It is very epic and soothing, just what we neurotic students need hehe.
    In any case, EMI records have released one of his CDS ("Litany to Thunder", very recommended). Contact me if you want more info.
    Beside that, who likes Arvo Part here?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    hmmm....:confused: :



    HALBERSTADT, Germany, May 4 — If you miss Friday's musical happening at St. Burchardi Church in this eastern German town, no worries. There is always 2008. And the next year. And the one after that.

    "It doesn't sound like Beethoven," said Rainer Neugebauer, a member of the foundation behind the performance, scheduled to last 639 years.

    In fact, you have about six more centuries to hear developments in the work being performed, a version of a composition by John Cage called "As Slow as Possible." A group of musicians and town boosters has given the title a ridiculously extreme interpretation, by stretching the performance to 639 years.

    Like the imperceptible movement of a glacier, a chord change was planned for Friday. Two pipes were to be removed from the rudimentary organ (which is being built as the piece goes on, with pipes added and subtracted as needed), eliminating a pair of E's. Cage devotees, musicians and the curious have trickled in to Halberstadt, a town about two and a half hours southwest of Berlin by train known as the birthplace of canned hot dogs and home to a collection of 18,000 stuffed birds.

    "In these times, acceleration spoils everything," said Heinz-Klaus Metzger, a prominent musicologist whose chance comments at an organ conference nine years ago sparked the project. "To begin a performance with the perspective of more than a half-millennium — it's just a kind of negation of the lifestyle of today."

    The only limitations on the length of the performance are the durability of the organ and the will of future generations.

    For anyone keeping records, the performance is probably already the world's longest, even though it has barely begun. The organ's bellows began their whoosh on Sept. 5, 2001, on what would have been Cage's 89th birthday. But nothing was heard because the musical arrangement begins with a rest — of 20 months. It was only on Feb. 5, 2003, that the first chord, two G sharps and a B in between, was struck. Notes are sounding or ceasing once or twice a year — sometimes at even longer intervals — always on the fifth day of the month, to honor Cage, who died in 1992.

    There are eight movements, and Cage specified that at least one be repeated. Each movement lasts roughly 71 years, just four years shy of the life expectancy of the average German male. There is no need to wait for the end of a movement for late seating: St. Burchardi is open six days a week, and the notes have been sounding continuously.

    A whine can be faintly hard outside the front door of the church, a 1,000-year-old building that was once part of a Cistercian monastery and served as a pigsty when Halberstadt was a neglected industrial town in East Germany.

    A cool blast of air comes through the open door, and the sound grows louder. After one spends some time within the bare stone walls, the urge to hum in unison proves irresistible. An electric bellows — about the size of three double beds in a row — sits in the left transept. Underground piping brings air to the organ in the right transept, which at this point is a wooden frame with six pipes. Small weights hold down wooden tabs: the keys. A plexiglass case muffles the sound. Neighbors complained that they could not sleep after the first notes sounded.

    The place attracts people seeking a peaceful moment or communion with Cage's spirit. One student from the Juilliard School asked to spend a night in the church, said Georg Bandarau, the town's marketing director and manager of the Cage project. A Canadian writer who is going blind and making journeys to experience his other senses arrived Thursday.

    The project's spirit is firmly in keeping with the proclivities of Cage, whose works pushed the boundaries of music and sought to meld life and art. One of his cardinal principles was to give the performer wide leeway. His most famous work may be "4' 33" " — in which the performer or performers sit silently for 4 minutes 33 seconds. Some consider him as much a philosopher as a musician.

    Indeed, the Cage organ project is part serious musical endeavor, part intellectual exercise and part tourist attraction, the sort of thing that happens when the local worthies of a European town join with ambitious artists. And it has come to mean different things to different people.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GeneralOfTheSuperSubSquad)
    I like music that takes it's influences from classical music, but Bach and Chopin is too old fashioned for me, Enya is more my kind of classical music.
    so, you enjoy music that takes "its" influences from classical music, which, without classical music, will never be in its present status..

    by the way.. three centuries later, people will still probably be listening to Bach, but Enya? hmmm.. :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ulv!)
    Here is a question I posted in the music section. It failed dismally (7 views and 0 replies ). Maybe it will have more success here....
    Hello all,
    Was wondering if any of you know Veljo Tormis, a XXth century Estonian composer (still active) who basically bases his choir music on millenia-old traditional Estoniain chants ("regilauks") that are still sung in Estonia. His music is fascinating, typically Baltic in character I would say. It is very epic and soothing, just what we neurotic students need hehe.
    In any case, EMI records have released one of his CDS ("Litany to Thunder", very recommended). Contact me if you want more info.
    Beside that, who likes Arvo Part here?
    interesting..!
    really..
    i never heard of him.. (Tormis) how very disgraceful of me.. :p: that sounds really interesting though.
    Avro Part? care to give me more info?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    um sure, the smileys you used make me doubt you are truly interested, but here are links with far more information than I could give you anyhow.
    www.arvopart.org
    www.arvopart.info
    www.veljotormis.com
    www.artistsonly.com/tormhm.htm
    both of these composers have achieved intervational fame (especially Part, who has worked with musicians like Gidon Kremer and Keith Jarrett) in the world of classical music, despite the fact that you don't hear them on BBC radio. Anyone interested in modern classical music should check them out.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Okay, to give my views on Arvo Part - I just don't like him. :/ we played a piece for string orchestra by him, and it just wasn't my taste - in my violin teacher's view it was beautiful, but I basically regarded it as completely boring and there was no passion or highlight at all. oh well...
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by greeniev)
    the piano concerto?? :love: man, I love it so much...
    Rachmaninov's piano concerto is absolutely amazing! I never get sick of it!

    Who's read and enjoyed 'An Equal Music' by Vikram Seth?
    I liked it, but I have the misfortune of not being a music student. Growing up I did art, drama and loads of englishy writing stuff to name a very few. I always regretted not going on with my music, but you can't do everything in life! Only problem is.. when you read books like that.. or threads like this.. you don't know all the lingo!!! :confused: lol
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Loved loved loved "An Equal Music".
    As for Arvo Part - I remember hearing something by him on Classic FM and liking it, but I can't remember what it was
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I never listen to Classic FM Maybe I should!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    I never listen to Classic FM Maybe I should!
    classic fm's quite good for hunting out new favourites! But mostly I'm very set in my ways.. prefer to stick with my cds.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Radio 3 is far superior to classical FM! Not only do you get more varied stuff, you get the work in context so that it's always easier to find out more if you want to.

    Also, Craghyrax your text colour is giving me eye cancer.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spam-mi-am)
    Radio 3 is far superior to classical FM! Not only do you get more varied stuff, you get the work in context so that it's always easier to find out more if you want to.

    Also, Craghyrax your text colour is giving me eye cancer.
    Lol.. you're certainly not the first. My apologies.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I've sung a piece by Arvo Part..it was um interesting
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

3,016

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
Do you want your parents to be with you when you collect your A-level results?
Useful resources

Articles:

TSR wiki music section

Quick link:

Unanswered music threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.