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    Went to see don giovanni last night - my first ever real opera. I had a great time! Although at times it did seem to meander, but then I don't suppose you can expect all 3hrs 15minutes to be genius, even if it is Mozart. My favourite part was the Commandatore scene.
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    Ace! Glad you enjoyed it!

    Mozart :love:
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    Went to see don giovanni last night - my first ever real opera. I had a great time! Although at times it did seem to meander, but then I don't suppose you can expect all 3hrs 15minutes to be genius, even if it is Mozart. My favourite part was the Commandatore scene.
    Lucky you! *envy* You finished all your exams then? *drowning in textbooks* :eek:
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    (Original post by Burky)
    Also I somehow got tricked into having to perform at a small concert this monday with about two weeks notice before, which I really didn't want to do. The only piece which I could play close to concert standard was Chopin's Fantaisie Impromptu (No. 4), Opus. 51.
    Can anyone who knows this piece give me some hints of how it should be played stylistically, as I have no recordings of it, though I did see it in concert a while back.
    Loads of rubato. With Chopin, no two bars are the same length. And play gently as well, especially those little grace note runs he is so fond of.
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    To dig something up from months ago...

    (Original post by Ulv!)
    Here is a question I posted in the music section. It failed dismally (7 views and 0 replies ). Maybe it will have more success here....
    Hello all,
    Was wondering if any of you know Veljo Tormis, a XXth century Estonian composer (still active) who basically bases his choir music on millenia-old traditional Estoniain chants ("regilauks") that are still sung in Estonia. His music is fascinating, typically Baltic in character I would say. It is very epic and soothing, just what we neurotic students need hehe.
    In any case, EMI records have released one of his CDS ("Litany to Thunder", very recommended). Contact me if you want more info.
    Beside that, who likes Arvo Part here?
    I have not encountered Tormis, but I have a particular liking for a similar-sounding composer called Eduard Tubin (1905-1982). He was a kind of Estonian Vaughan Williams, using a folk song style with more than a hint of Sibelius in his music, and was also as prolific as a symphonist (10 complete, 11th unfinished). I would highly recommend his output, which also includes several concertos, as I would also describe it as 'epic and soothing'. He'd probably be better known if he hadn't had to flee the Soviets to Sweden in 1944, where he was rather neglected. The Third ('Heroic') and Fourth ('Lyrical')symphonies are probably the best place to start, they are the most melodic, but the symphonies get more dissonant and atonal as they go on. All are available on BIS with Neeme Jarvi (who else?) and various orchestras, and I think there is a rival cycle in progress with Arvo Volmer and the Estonian NO.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Lucky you! *envy* You finished all your exams then? *drowning in textbooks* :eek:
    Heh... I finished on the 11th May!
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    Heh... I finished on the 11th May!
    *Damn University students...:rolleyes: * Well, good for you
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    Even though I am not a member of the society now, I was and I have a question about something to do with classical music so this seems like an appropriate place to ask it. In the advertisement for 1664 (the bad year for composing good for beer (or something like that) one) does the music that is played actually exist because I was certain it did but then somebody who seems to know more than me about classical music said it didn't and my whole world fell to pieces. Could anyone help me out with a name of it if it does actually exist?

    PS: Hey Craghyrax, you seem to be everywhere I go these days!
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    (Original post by rewmck)
    PS: Hey Craghyrax, you seem to be everywhere I go these days!
    Rewmck! I was quite surprised to see your name next to Classical soc in my user cp! I haven't seen the add; sorry (been studying too hard to watch tv - Lol!) :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Rewmck! I was quite surprised to see your name next to Classical soc in my user cp! I haven't seen the add; sorry (been studying too hard to watch tv - Lol!) :rolleyes:
    It's a pretty old add, possibly older than time itself but I am not completely sure. It is the one where they are in a big hall and the orchestra plays an impressive introduction which is cut short as if the composer never got round to writing it.
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    The theme is used in Benjamin Britten's Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra, but it's originally some kind of variations on a theme by Purcell (I used to know but I forget what). 1664 is not actually the right year.
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    (Original post by rewmck)
    It's a pretty old add, possibly older than time itself but I am not completely sure. It is the one where they are in a big hall and the orchestra plays an impressive introduction which is cut short as if the composer never got round to writing it.
    Oh yeh.. I remember the ad now, distantly, but not the music :rolleyes: (fat lot of good..)
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    (Original post by rewmck)
    Even though I am not a member of the society now, I was and I have a question about something to do with classical music so this seems like an appropriate place to ask it. In the advertisement for 1664 (the bad year for composing good for beer (or something like that) one) does the music that is played actually exist because I was certain it did but then somebody who seems to know more than me about classical music said it didn't and my whole world fell to pieces. Could anyone help me out with a name of it if it does actually exist?

    PS: Hey Craghyrax, you seem to be everywhere I go these days!
    You wouldn't have had that kind of ensemble in 1664 (it had trombones in it didn't it?), but the actual music itself may have been written before.

    It seems quite a basic piece so it may well have just been commissioned for the advert. I wouldn't count on it being too attentive to detail - it is a beer advert after all!

    One thing's for certain - the score you see on the paper beforehand definitely isn't what they play :p:
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    One thing's for certain - the score you see on the paper beforehand definitely isn't what they play :p:
    LOL! :rolleyes:
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    I recognise that music and it's definitely part of another piece.
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    Well if anyone finds out what it is then let us know as we're all so fascinated :p:

    Meanwhile, I thought I'd share some news with whoever's interested I got an e-mail from the director of a Brazilian orchestra who are interested in performing one of my pieces!!
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    Wow that is fab mike!! Told you your comps are amazing!!

    Keep it up!!!
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    Oooh! How exciting! :king1:
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    Well if anyone finds out what it is then let us know as we're all so fascinated :p:
    It's as i said further up the page, it's definately by Purcell (written in 1670 something) and was definately used as a theme for Benjamin Britten's Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra.
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    That's it - Benjamin Britten, I didn't see your post James. I thought it was that.

    Don't know the Purcell link though.
 
 
 
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