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TSR Classical Music Society watch

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    Hello. How we doing? We have 100 members now

    I've recently been getting into Elgar more lately. Can anyone recommend any of his stuff (apart from the really well known things like Enigma etc). Are there any other composers of his time similar to his style?
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    In the South? His 2 symphonies? .
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    I find it very special that England respects her composers so much. Händel, Purcell, Elgar. They have all been respected by the whole nation, it seems. While Mozart was buried in a mass grave, they were buried in Westminster Abbey if I'm right.

    Especially Elgar is hardly ever mentioned here. Seriously, I can't even name a single composition written by him.
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    I'm afraid to say that Elgar is still a rather neglected composer, and seen as stuffy and old-fashioned. It's a shame, because it's very good and deeply-felt music. Have you heard the Cello Concerto?
    Also Violin concerto, reconstructed Third Symphony, Dream of Gerontius, Cockaigne, In the South, Froissart, Piano Concerto, The Music Makers

    Also might want to try Charles Villers Stanford - he mostly wrote choral music, although there are symphonies too.
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    Ohh I have Dream of Gerontius
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    Yesterday, from HMV I got:
    Holst - The Planets - £5
    Bach - Magnificat(performed it with chorus) /Vivaldi - Kyrie in Gm - £5
    Mozart - Requiem (we're doing Verdi's Requiem this coming semester - Dies Irae here I come!) - £5
    Saint-Saens - Symphony No. 3/Carnival of the Animals/Danse Macabre - £5.
    And because I get student discount, it was only £18 - I'm so happy, just listening to my stash now.
    Also, I'm interested as to what people think of the Mozart and Verdi Requiems. Overall, I would say that although Verdi's Dies Irae is better than Mozart's, you can't beat the Mozart Requiem overall (not forgetting the beautiful Lacrimosa). What does everyone else think?
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    I don't know Verdi's Requiem so I can't really comment objectively! I adore Mozart's though!
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    (Original post by siwi)
    I'm afraid to say that Elgar is still a rather neglected composer, and seen as stuffy and old-fashioned. It's a shame, because it's very good and deeply-felt music. Have you heard the Cello Concerto?
    I agree! Bought a CD of Jacqueline Du Pre playing that and also one of Dvorak's Cello Concertos - absolutely spellbinding, and extremely deep-felt.

    Theres loads of great classical music out there at very discount prices, but do people ever feel slightly out of their depth when confronted by different interpretations of the same pieces? (For instance I remember searching for a collection of Beethoven's Piano Sonatas, and coming up with dozens and dozens of different versions. In the end I bought a few, to try and see what took me, hated Brendel's dry as dust, emotionless playing, but loved Rubinstein's - has an incredible feel for the pieces.)

    Currently listening to : Schubert's Last Four Quartets (has there ever been anything better???)
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    (Original post by Astral Weeks)
    I agree! Bought a CD of Jacqueline Du Pre playing that and also one of Dvorak's Cello Concertos - absolutely spellbinding, and extremely deep-felt.

    Theres loads of great classical music out there at very discount prices, but do people ever feel slightly out of their depth when confronted by different interpretations of the same pieces? (For instance I remember searching for a collection of Beethoven's Piano Sonatas, and coming up with dozens and dozens of different versions. In the end I bought a few, to try and see what took me, hated Brendel's dry as dust, emotionless playing, but loved Rubinstein's - has an incredible feel for the pieces.)

    Currently listening to : Schubert's Last Four Quartets (has there ever been anything better???)
    Elgar, Schubert and Du Pre all rock my socks. Not as much as Mozart, of course, but they still rock them considerably. I'm listening to Vivaldi's Kyrie in Gm right now.
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    Du Pré's version of Saint-Saens' "The Swan" from "Carnival of the Animals" is also excellent.

    fanofkdc - your stash sounds excellent! *is jealous* *plans a trip to HMV when she gets back to Exeter to take advantage of the Janury sales*
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    I find Hildegard von bingen's 'maria autrix vite' to be really wonderful.
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    [QUOTE=siwi]I'm afraid to say that Elgar is still a rather neglected composer, and seen as stuffy and old-fashioned. It's a shame, because it's very good and deeply-felt music. Have you heard the Cello Concerto?[Quote]
    Living in Elagr country, I hear it a lot - esp. during the 3 Choirs Festival. He wrote a huge amount and some of it is rather Edwardian middle-class but you're quite right about the pieces that are glorious. The 'cello concerto is sublime. It was his reaction to WW1 and is heartrending and uplifting at the same time. I'm still torn between Du Pre's and Casal's performances but I think Du Pre has it on sheer emotion.
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    (Original post by fletch)
    Living in Elgar country, I hear it a lot - esp. during the 3 Choirs Festival. He wrote a huge amount and some of it is rather Edwardian middle-class but you're quite right about the pieces that are glorious. The 'cello concerto is sublime. It was his reaction to WW1 and is heartrending and uplifting at the same time. I'm still torn between Du Pre's and Casal's performances but I think Du Pre has it on sheer emotion.

    Du Pre's Elgar (or Saint-Saens, or Dvorak or...), Argerich's Rach 3, Rubinstein's "Pathetique" - the best performances are the emotional ones!!

    I think its interesting you say that about Elgar's concerto. It's strange how often the greatest pieces, the ones people really relate to, we discuss with overt themes, we know where the music comes from, and what kind of feeling its trying to convey, the portrait it tries to paint. I often find when listening to virtuoso players that it just because musical notes, and doesnt portray anything, yet when someone says this is about "..." even if its an incredibly vague idea or notion, then it still manages to frame a piece just enough so its accessible and one can relate to it, yet still broad and deep enough to endlessly wonder at. Anyone else sometimes feel that?
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    Can I join please
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    *starts sobbing at thought of Du Pre playing the cello* Ohhhhhh, all the emotional pieces! *bawls*
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    I've just returned from an orchestral course where we were playing Elgar's (not very well known) Falstaff. It has some beautiful moments but I think that it is a little on the long side. I adore the Cello Concerto, and may be playing it in summer (in the orchestra unfortunately). Alternatively, I may choose to do do another orchestral course and end up doing the Enigma Variations. Basically, the choice is Elgar or Elgar.

    Just now I am liking a lot Beethoven's late String Quartet in C sharp minor and Clara Schumann's Piano Trio.
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    Playing clarinet in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Mendelssohn's A Midsummer Nights Dream on Thursday .
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    Lucky you sexysax

    I'm having my first ever clarinet lesson today and looking forward to it sooooo much.

    And just for fun, here's my musical dream from a couple of nights back:
    I dreamt that I was at a fancy dinner with all kinds of people from musical history, past and present. Frank Sinatra was a dirty old man - one of those really annoying flirts who won't look at your face, but rather a few inches below that...
    Bryn Terfel was also there but thought I was only talking to him in the hope that he could help me get a record contract. Gabriel Faure was also there but I didn't get to speak to him. Throughout the dinner, a classical choir were singing Handel's Messiah (very well I might add) and then afterwards the diners became aware that a table full of the Elizabethan Gospel Choir (goodness knows why it was called this) were bursting into evangelical/modern hymns every so often with the help of little green and pink hymnals that they'd brought with them. They then tried to get me to sing something, which I refused to do on account of having no sheet music with me.

    lol I'm sure you could read all sorts of stuff into that...
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    You didn't have mushrooms for supper did you?:p:
    Quote from my principal (who plays in our orchestra):
    'I dreamt I was performing in handel's "Messiah". Then I woke up and discovered I was!'

    The Prokoviev and Mendelssohn - what an inspired combination. Love them both for their restraint and superb structure. Hard to believe M. was only 19 when he wrote "Mitsommernachtstraum". (Edexcel would still probably have given him a C.)
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    (Original post by fanofkdc)
    *starts sobbing at thought of Du Pre playing the cello* Ohhhhhh, all the emotional pieces! *bawls*


    Try this then:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Schubert-Las...e=UTF8&s=music

    Dont think anyone has quite perfected "Death and the Maiden" quite yet, which isnt surprising as its arguably THE most emotional, heartfelt, majestic etc piece of music ever written. This version is still awesome though.
 
 
 
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