Turn on thread page Beta

TSR Classical Music Society watch

    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I often describe Brahms as 'musical noise', mostly to irritate my Dad who loves it. Some of his stuff is nice though, his clarinet sonatas for example.

    GRIEG IS A GREAT COMPOSER!!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah Brahms is nice. Wittgenstein described him as "Mendelssohn without the flaws.":p: Not sure how accurate that is though.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    People seem to be talking a lot about composers (Schubert, Beethoven, Wagner, Haydn, Berlioz and Grieg for me at the moment) but not about specific genres, or individual performers. How about discussing individual interpretatins of pieces or just favourite instrumentalists in general?
    I love the cello, and chamber music in general (quartets, trios or concertos) rather than symphonies which often feel like exercises in orchestral breadth rather than expression, but I guess thats probably my musical ignorance speaking (Im a latecomer to classical music).
    Jacqueline du Pre (everything, especially the Elgar, Schumann and Dvorak), Pablo Casals (Bach suites and more) and Quartetto Italiano (Beethoven, Schubert's Late Quartets) are my runaway favourites at the moment, although I really like Rubinstein's interpretations of Beethoven's piano sonatas.

    How about everyone else?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Good point on interpretation. In jazz it is the performer (sometimes a particular performance/recording) that is the star; often working with a mediocre composition e.g. John Coltrane's version of "My Favourite Things". In "classical" music the spotlight tends to be on the composer. Some composers recognised the importance of the performers who would interpret their work; Mahler left instructions that any conductor who was interpreting his work should make whatever changes he feels would enhance the music - quite a brave offer.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Hello all!
    I'm listening to ClassicFM just now... it's my one and only source for classical music as I don't know enough yet to buy a CD.. I'm pretty unknowledgable when it comes to classical music. I know only of a few pieces. To he honest all these composers and pieces is intimidating and I have no idea where to begin lol.

    I love Debussy especially Clair de Lune and La Mer

    Vivaldi's Four Seasons just came on! I love this also.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Why not start with some compilation CDs until you find some composers/genres that appeal?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lou_)
    Hello all!
    I'm listening to ClassicFM just now... it's my one and only source for classical music as I don't know enough yet to buy a CD.. I'm pretty unknowledgable when it comes to classical music. I know only of a few pieces. To he honest all these composers and pieces is intimidating and I have no idea where to begin lol.

    I love Debussy especially Clair de Lune and La Mer

    Vivaldi's Four Seasons just came on! I love this also.
    Radio 3 is a lot better than Classic FM if you really want to get into classical music, and explore it in all its depth and glory, rather than just the summery, twiddly bits.

    The EMI Great recordings of the century series (all on Amazon somewhere) is possibly the best place to start CD wise.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    You could try Grieg....

    I would agree that a compilation is worth getting, then you can decide on periods, composers that you like the sound of.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I agree, definitely start with a compilation I've recently been listening to opera and I started that with a compilation CD to get into the genre.

    I've figured out so far that I love Mozart's operas (I knew that already thanks to Amadeus, which inspired me to go and see Don Giovanni and the Magic Flute) as well as Bizet, Puccini and Handel.


    When it comes to certain pieces of music, interpretation can be everything. For example, I personally have a very particular idea about how I like to hear movements of Mozart's requiem performed. If, say, the Kyrie is performed too slowly or the first one (always forget what it's called ) is too fast then it sort of ruins it for me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    By the way, does anyone know where I can view classical scores? I'd really like to study some over the summer.
    Offline

    14
    http://www.sheetmusicarchive.net/ provides a good range of free sheet music, including most popular composers and their pieces.

    For completeness, the first movement of Mozart's Requiem is called the requiem aeternam.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Most good libraries will have a tonne of Dover study scores, they are fab for following along to a CD with
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Also try http://www.classicalarchives.com/ You can download MIDI files and open them in Sibelius. You can also download a lot of audio files.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Rostropovich has died.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6598895.stm
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Strauss II anyone?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Strauss II anyone?
    *throws up*
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Not actually a member of this soc, hope you dont mind me posting...
    but Ive got to say, yesterday I purchased the score to Shostakovich's

    Violin Concerto No. 1 in A Minor, Op.99: IV. Burlesque

    Its amazing to play
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I've recently discovered bach's four duets and am learning them, the first is partiocularly nice, if a little spiky.
    Offline

    14
    I can't say I am particularly excited with the programme for the Proms this year.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    A tad naff isn't it!
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

2,791

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Useful resources

Articles:

TSR wiki music section

Quick link:

Unanswered music threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.