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TSR Classical Music Society watch

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    (Original post by studentin007)
    Anyone like Libera?
    Yay Libera! I love their music; the mix of ancient and modern just works so well and just sounds brilliant! I've bought a couple of their CDs, and they've become my "make me feel better when I'm down" CDs!
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)

    On a general note, I've heard that the transition from classical piano to jazz piano is massive - does anyone here feel competent at both styles? What are the differences? I'm just curious!
    Like many classically trained pianists, I struggled for ages with jazz, mainly learning notated versions of jazz standards and trying to get my head round all the "difficult" chords.It wasn't until I was doing history of jazz as a special paper that I came across a throw-away line in a book - "...of course, jazz is 90% rhythm..." and a light suddenly switched on in my head.
    Yes, you need to get fluent with some scales, esp. pentatonics with some chromatics thrown in, and you need to have good basic chord theory (although the progressions are a lot simpler than you might think), but the most important thing is to be able to play around with the rhythms without losing the beat or the swing feel. Wrong notes at the right time are better than the converse.
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    I like Libera too
    And congrats on the Promcast thing! Do let us know when the site's up, won't you?
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    I like Libera too
    And congrats on the Promcast thing! Do let us know when the site's up, won't you?
    Hey, it's up and can be found at http://www.promcast.co.uk/promcasts/...l-roberts.html Please let me know what you think And rate it if you like...

    Unfortunately it's just the MIDI recording I sent in, and not an actual performance which I'd hoped for (it has been implied by the times that they would record it properly...)
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    Hey
    To add another sub-topic into the mix....
    I was wondering if anyone had any knowledge on the psychology/neuroscience of music? As in music's effects on a persons psychology/brain...
    Its something I'd really like to learn a bit more about

    Also, possibly just pure rumour, but someone mentioned to me two things
    1. a key/tonality that puts people in the most relaxed state
    and
    2. a work which also calms everyone
    although to me they seem unrealistic.... was just wondering if anyone else had heard of these?

    Any suggested reading as well?
    Thankyou all!
    Oliver
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    (Original post by olivermc)
    Hey
    To add another sub-topic into the mix....
    I was wondering if anyone had any knowledge on the psychology/neuroscience of music? As in music's effects on a persons psychology/brain...
    Its something I'd really like to learn a bit more about

    ...

    Any suggested reading as well?
    Thankyou all!
    Oliver

    Musicophilia by Oliver Sacks
    would be a fantastic place to start. It's an excellent book which I'm sure you'll find interesting.
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    Haha excellent
    I ordered that like 2 days ago.... just waiting for it to arrive :P

    I doubt this is true.... but someone was talking to me about something like a work that lowers the heart rate and calms everyone down
    and they also mentioned a tonality/key thats inherently soothing
    anyone heard anything like that?
    To me that doesn't really sound plausible but I know practically nothing in the area :P

    Thanks
    Oliver
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    (Original post by olivermc)
    Haha excellent
    I ordered that like 2 days ago.... just waiting for it to arrive :P

    I doubt this is true.... but someone was talking to me about something like a work that lowers the heart rate and calms everyone down
    and they also mentioned a tonality/key thats inherently soothing
    anyone heard anything like that?
    To me that doesn't really sound plausible but I know practically nothing in the area :P

    Thanks
    Oliver
    It's not unreasonable. I know nothing at all either, but I do know that music can provoke startling psychological and physical responses in people.
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    We had a trainging day when it was suggested that certain tempi of music provoke different brainwave response and it seemed to work for most of the teachers in the room except me and the other music teachers! Apparently you're not supposed to actually listen to the music.
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    (Original post by Fletch)
    We had a trainging day when it was suggested that certain tempi of music provoke different brainwave response and it seemed to work for most of the teachers in the room except me and the other music teachers! Apparently you're not supposed to actually listen to the music.
    That I can see would be the flaw with the hypothesis :p:
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    Has any one here ever listened to indian classical?

    im currently studying it now for IB and im falling in love with the Tablas.
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    Tablas are fantastic. Not quite such a fan of the Sitar myself, but the percussion is amazing.
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    Hello everyone

    I love classical music - well, nearly all of it. I could never muster up much enthusiasm for Stockhausen, for example. I teach the flute and recorder and have a particular fondness for baroque/classical music on original instruments.

    'Musicophilia' by Oliver Sacks is absolutely brilliant; I really recommend it!
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    Hi everyone.

    I'm new to this society. Just wondering what is the most difficult classical instument to play (yet ofcourse also most admirable if played incredibly well).:confused:
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    (Original post by wonderwall 124)
    Hi everyone.

    I'm new to this society. Just wondering what is the most difficult classical instument to play (yet ofcourse also most admirable if played incredibly well).:confused:
    Subject to opinion, but I think the violin.
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    french horn. possibly the only instrument it's expected to hear mistakes and split notes on in classical orchestras. This is because the open notes (ones where the pitch is changed with the lip shape not valves) are very close together at the top of the horn's range, making picking the correct lip shape often hit or miss!
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    (Original post by Rich_b)
    french horn. possibly the only instrument it's expected to hear mistakes and split notes on in classical orchestras. This is because the open notes (ones where the pitch is changed with the lip shape not valves) are very close together at the top of the horn's range, making picking the correct lip shape often hit or miss!
    I concur. :yep:

    I hear the split notes a lot in The Solo in the Finale of The Firebird Suite,

    Also i herd Oboe is damn difficult to tune, thats why orchestras tune to it.
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    I love the Firebird Suite, although I don't have it on record
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    I love it too! And I do actually have it on CD as well , it's on a CD with some other stuff. Double bass part was actually fun! It's always nice to be used as a independent instrument rather than supporting the weedy cellos :p:
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    Only just found this thread. Hello and all that. All I have to say at the moment is that (the) Anvil Chorus is the bestest piece of classical music ever. Well, for the next few days until I find something I like more, I mean.
 
 
 
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