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TSR Classical Music Society watch

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    (Original post by meatball893)
    There's a meaty one... You can really get your teeth into his music... :awesome:

    Spoiler:
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    Also, his music is a swine to play.
    Pos-repped

    Genius!
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    HAHA Nicely done :P
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    Watch out, masterwork coming through.
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    (Original post by Fletch)
    Hi Guys
    I haven't visited for a long time (another story) and I'm loving the new-look TSR.

    Here's a topic for discussion and I'm not declaring my position until I've seen some of your arguments

    Is classical music i.e. Western European art music, intrinsically superior to non-classical music e.g. pop, rock, jazz, musical theatre?

    Obviously this needs a bit of defining of terms, setting values, examples etc. but I think you know where I'm going.

    Nice to be back.
    No. First, I know what you're getting at, but don't fully understand how it can be applied without a clear definition of superior. "Higher or greater in excellence" doesn't cut it. I'm pretty out of touch with the music world, but with the little history I remember from my GCSE classes, I would conclude that many a great composer had a period of rebellion against what he viewed as a contemporary form inferior to his own. I don't know what makes a piece complex, but if complexity is the category on which we judge the superiority of a piece, I think that, although classical music would blatantly outstrip the majority of pop and rock, it would struggle against some forms of Jazz and Bebop. There is my uneducated guess.
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    1. Beethoven
    2. Bach
    3. Mozart
    4. Haydn
    5. Schoenberg (though I personally prefer Webern)
    6. Chopin
    7. Handel
    8. Schubert
    9. Purcell
    10. Stravinsky

    Ten is too hard

    11. Wagner
    12. Mahler
    13. Monteverdi
    14. Messiaen
    15. Prokofiev
    16. Rameau
    17. Verdi
    18. Berlioz
    19. Orlando Gibbons
    20. Tallis

    Still couldn't squeeze in Rimsky-Korsakov, F. Couperin and Palestrina. Diverging a bit, I think Schumann is pretty underrated, he seems to get a lot of stick. Renaissance to mid Baroque tends to be overlooked too.

    Lots of overrated Romantic composers IMO. Brahms especially - I find his works complete drivel, though I can appreciate their formal qualities. Tchaikovsky :rofl2:: "I have played over the music of that scoundrel Brahms. What a giftless *******!" He also wrote this, which is precisely how I feel

    "Brahms's [Violin] Concerto appealed to me just as little as everything else he has written. He is of course a great musician and even a master, but [in his works] there is more mastery than inspiration. Lots of preparations as it were for something, lots of hints that something is going to appear very soon and enchant you, but nothing does come out of it all, except for boredom. His music is not warmed by genuine feeling; it has no poetry; what it has instead is enormous pretension to depth. However, in this depth there is nothing—it's just empty space. For example, let us take the opening of the concerto. It is beautiful as the introduction to something; it is like a splendid pedestal for a column, but the actual column is missing, and, instead, what comes immediately after one pedestal is simply another pedestal. I don't know whether I'm adequately expressing my thoughts, or rather the feeling which Brahms's music instils in me. What I'm trying to get at is that he never actually says anything, and if he does, then he fails to say it completely. His music consists of skilfully pasted-together fragments of something. The overall design lacks distinctiveness, colour, and life. However, I think that quite apart from all these specific criticisms I should above all say that Brahms, as a musical personality, is simply antipathetic to me—I can't stand him. No matter how much he tries, I always remain cold and hostile. This is a purely instinctive reaction"
    Can anyone enlighten me on Brahms?
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    1. Beethoven
    2. Bach
    3. Mozart
    4. Haydn
    5. Schoenberg (though I personally prefer Webern)
    6. Chopin
    7. Handel
    8. Schubert
    9. Purcell
    10. Stravinsky

    Ten is too hard

    11. Wagner
    12. Mahler
    13. Monteverdi
    14. Messiaen
    15. Prokofiev
    16. Rameau
    17. Verdi
    18. Berlioz
    19. Orlando Gibbons
    20. Tallis

    Still couldn't squeeze in Rimsky-Korsakov, F. Couperin and Palestrina. Diverging a bit, I think Schumann is pretty underrated, he seems to get a lot of stick. Renaissance to mid Baroque tends to be overlooked too.

    Lots of overrated Romantic composers IMO. Brahms especially - I find his works complete drivel, though I can appreciate their formal qualities. Tchaikovsky :rofl2:: "I have played over the music of that scoundrel Brahms. What a giftless *******!" He also wrote this, which is precisely how I feel



    Can anyone enlighten me on Brahms?
    Have you listened to the 6th of Op.118? It's so desolate.
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    (Original post by scherzi)

    Lots of overrated Romantic composers IMO.
    6. Chopin



    Can anyone enlighten me on Brahms?
    Much like Wagner, he seems to evoke a love-hate response from listeners - though, have you heard his Lieder or German Requiem?
    (I agree however that there is a lacking of early composers in the lists, so replacing Brahms with Dowland or Dufay might be better.)
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    (Original post by scherzi)


    Lots of overrated Romantic composers IMO. Brahms especially - I find his works complete drivel, though I can appreciate their formal qualities. Tchaikovsky :rofl2:: "I have played over the music of that scoundrel Brahms. What a giftless *******!" He also wrote this, which is precisely how I feel



    Can anyone enlighten me on Brahms?

    Totally agree with you (and 'coffers) on Brahms!
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    (Original post by Fletch)

    Is classical music i.e. Western European art music, intrinsically superior to non-classical music e.g. pop, rock, jazz, musical theatre?

    I think it has to be, as with the possible exception of jazz (and maybe some musical theatre), all the other forms are essentially "popular" music which are written to have an instant appeal. This means it's nearly always necessarily simple music.


    Musical Theatre can occasionally stray over more to the classical side like opera, so it's difficult to generalise.


    Jazz is difficult to compare with classical to as it's just a completely different philosophy of music. In terms of harmonic & rhythmic complexity jazz can be as intriguing as it gets! But you don't often get highly orchestrated music and even the most complicated big band chart wouldn't normally compare to a symphony.
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    (Original post by sarah0sarah)
    Have you listened to the 6th of Op.118? It's so desolate.
    You mean that in a good way?

    (Original post by danadd9)
    Much like Wagner, he seems to evoke a love-hate response from listeners - though, have you heard his Lieder or German Requiem?
    (I agree however that there is a lacking of early composers in the lists, so replacing Brahms with Dowland or Dufay might be better.)
    Haha, why don't you rate Chopin? I see that his works, as universal as they are, can't be seen in the same light as some of the others at the top. Nonetheless I think he warrants his place for being hugely influential and a pretty unique poetic genius. As for Brahms - I do generally like his Lieder, it's a lot more interesting. Haven't heard his Requiem in its entirety though. I think I was a bit harsh, I like a few of his works (e.g. Third Racket )
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    Haha, why don't you rate Chopin? I see that his works, as universal as they are, can't be seen in the same light as some of the others at the top. Nonetheless I think he warrants his place for being hugely influential and a pretty unique poetic genius. As for Brahms - I do generally like his Lieder, it's a lot more interesting. Haven't heard his Requiem in its entirety though. I think I was a bit harsh, I like a few of his works (e.g. Third Racket )
    Eh, even though he made some interesting contributions to the piano repertoire, I just don't think of him as a revolutionary harmonist (or orchestrator even).
    Alright then, what if I replace Brahms with Scriabin or Messiaen in my list? How do you feel about Scriabin/Messiaen?
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    Eh, even though he made some interesting contributions to the piano repertoire, I just don't think of him as a revolutionary harmonist (or orchestrator even).
    Alright then, what if I replace Brahms with Scriabin or Messiaen in my list? How do you feel about Scriabin/Messiaen?
    Yeah his orchestration was pretty much non-existent. And I was actually just about to post this (from a great channel)



    I forgot to put Scriabin in my list. Both really don't get the attention they deserve, I guess since they're mavericks. I find them among the most interesting, especially Messiaen, who I'm still discovering
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    I think it has to be, as with the possible exception of jazz (and maybe some musical theatre), all the other forms are essentially "popular" music which are written to have an instant appeal. This means it's nearly always necessarily simple music.


    ..... luls
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    (Original post by concubine)
    ..... luls
    By "all the other forms" I meant the ones specified soo in this case pop and rock
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    You mean that in a good way?

    Yes, in a very good way. You should try listening to it

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crrxk6ptsFc
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    NEW TOPIC, what are everyone's favourite overtures?




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    (Original post by danadd9)
    NEW TOPIC, what are everyone's favourite overtures?
    100% agree with Tannhäuser. Definitely my favourite overture. Instead of Fidelio, however, I'd go for Leonore III. AWESOME flute solo


    Does this count? I can't find a brilliant recording on youtube though.


    Also (a little cheesy, I know, but so much fun to play):
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    NEW TOPIC, what are everyone's favourite overtures?
    Mozart's Abduction of the Seraglio and Beethoven's "The Creatures of Prometheus".
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    Hey guys

    I've just made the decision to start playing piano.

    On youtube, I love listening to piano covers of contemporary songs, mostly fast paced music, but not really fast, and not always.

    With this in mind, could anyone recommend me a, or some composers with fast paced classical music, mostly piano but perhaps a little percussion or other instruments too?
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    **** it, another prelude:


    (Original post by DonFahad)
    Herp-di-derp
    Obvious answer would probably be Rach, but Bartok also springs to mind:


 
 
 
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