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    I don't really know many overtures to list any favourites, apart from the mandatory Mozart


    :awesome:

    Moving on...

    Goldberg Variations for strings :coma:



    I think I've posted this before, still makes me laugh




    :rofl2:
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    Glenn Gould is my favourite pianist of all time. :proud:

    Tchaikovsky :love:

    Bit more jazzy but Thelonious Monk
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    Bump-a-roo:





    The above performance doesn't do the Janacek quartet any justice, but still, it's gorgeous.
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    (Original post by Stricof)
    Bit more jazzy but Thelonious Monk
    Yea, the lonliest monk :cool:

    Not to get too jazzy (we have our own society after all) but Jaques Loussier never fails to make me feel good.

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    I forget too often that there's much more to Liszt beyond the bravura typically associated with him



    On that note I wish today's standard of technical perfection being a foremost prerequisite would disappear, both in recordings and the concert hall. Brings me back to this article, which is worth a read for pianists
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    I forget too often that there's much more to Liszt beyond the bravura typically associated with him



    On that note I wish today's standard of technical perfection being a foremost prerequisite would disappear, both in recordings and the concert hall. Brings me back to this article, which is worth a read for pianists
    "Mitsuko Uchida" was my initial response to the first paragraph; I was glad he mentioned her first.

    I don't think that Martin Kettle's saying pianists don't need technical perfection, though. In my opinion, if you're playing wrong notes, not playing evenly, etc, then you don't have the technique to bring out the musicality either. It's not as though it's one or the other; without the technique, you can't achieve what you want to with the music. I know when I did the last movement of Ravel's Sonatine, there was nothing I could do with it musically at all until I had it perfect technically, and I think that it's not a new standard to demand technical perfection at all.

    On the other hand, Lang Lang's focus on showing off his technique above all else really annoys me. Can't stand him. This is why:
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    (Original post by Bezzler)
    "Mitsuko Uchida" was my initial response to the first paragraph; I was glad he mentioned her first.

    I don't think that Martin Kettle's saying pianists don't need technical perfection, though. In my opinion, if you're playing wrong notes, not playing evenly, etc, then you don't have the technique to bring out the musicality either. It's not as though it's one or the other; without the technique, you can't achieve what you want to with the music. I know when I did the last movement of Ravel's Sonatine, there was nothing I could do with it musically at all until I had it perfect technically, and I think that it's not a new standard to demand technical perfection at all.

    On the other hand, Lang Lang's focus on showing off his technique above all else really annoys me. Can't stand him. This is why:
    I understand that they aren't mutually exclusive by any means, however I get the feeling there's been an increased focus on technical perfection, such that focus on musicality has been lessened. The standard of technique, I think, was sufficient the best part of a century ago, but it still wasn't the 'perfection' that seems to be demanded today. From many observations, IMO the difference between 'nearly perfect' and 'perfect' is very significant in terms of approach to piano playing. Of course, technique is the very root of playing, and out of that has to come the musicality... I think this intrinsic link contributes to why one would affect the other. This is just conjecture though.

    It's not surprising nor distracting to hear mistakes in a Cortot recording. Hearing a blip in Kissin's playing would put me off more because there isn't really much beyond the flawless facade - it sounds like his first priority is unblemished note-playing. With regards to technique, 'near perfection' is fine with me but is it so for competitions? I'd imagine that with the advent of wider accessibility to learning the piano, some time last century, there came a greater necessity to play perfectly in order to compete with the many other prodigies. Generally I think there's this boring standard that top level pianists conform to so as not to appear anomalous in the face of objective judgment, and to which it's contributed by a relatively new mentality of 'virtuoso first, then musician'.

    Someone wrote this on Cortot's wikipedia page - "Technical flaws notwithstanding, Cortot was among the very greatest musicians of the century and represented "the end of an era." He is considered one of the last exponents of a personal, subjective style that deprecated precise technique in favour of intuition, interpretation, and authentic spirit. This approach was replaced by the modern "scientific" way of playing, which places logic and precision at the forefront and equates authenticity with exact and literal interpretations." - I recognise that there are other factors that have contributed to less subjective playing these days (and that this doesn't necessarily equate to less musicianship) but I think emphasis on technique has been one of them. Sorry for the essay :P didn't mean to ramble on
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    I know next-to-nothing about piano playing, so I'll throw Biret's performance of Boulez's Third Sonata at the two of you to make up for it:



    There we are.
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    Wasn't sure where to post this but does anyone know what the piece of music starting from 10:56 - 11:36ish is called in this clip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4ZYWxsE4EA
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    (Original post by RHCPfan)
    Wasn't sure where to post this but does anyone know what the piece of music starting from 10:56 - 11:36ish is called in this clip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4ZYWxsE4EA
    Reminds me of Borodin; doesn't sound familiar, though (perhaps I'm being ignorant) - it could just be music scored for the programme?
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    I will check Borodin out, thanks. Yeah it could of been scored for the programme. Thanks for the reply.
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    (Original post by RHCPfan)
    Wasn't sure where to post this but does anyone know what the piece of music starting from 10:56 - 11:36ish is called in this clip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4ZYWxsE4EA
    It reminds me of Vaughan-Williams' "The Lark Ascending" but I haven't found the section. V-W would be an obvious choice for depicting the English countryside.
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    have anyone heard of Brian Ferneyhough? his scores are FACE-MELTING... :P
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    (Original post by ch252525)
    have anyone heard of Brian Ferneyhough? his scores are FACE-MELTING... :P
    this is his Lemma-Icon-Epigram for solo piano.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJwxKxJVps4

    btw, he's a contemporary classical music composer... he's still living in the States
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    (Original post by ch252525)
    have anyone heard of Brian Ferneyhough? his scores are FACE-MELTING... :P
    When I read that, I assumed you meant his music was rely beautiful. So beautiful that your face would melt (strange figure of speech, I know, but some people on TSR...). But after looking at the score in the video linked below you, I understand. It kind of reminds me of these:

    Spoiler:
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    Spoiler:
    Show
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    I know next-to-nothing about piano playing, so I'll throw Biret's performance of Boulez's Third Sonata at the two of you to make up for it:



    There we are.
    what a horrible piece of .......music
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    (Original post by meatball893)
    When I read that, I assumed you meant his music was rely beautiful. So beautiful that your face would melt (strange figure of speech, I know, but some people on TSR...). But after looking at the score in the video linked below you, I understand. It kind of reminds me of these:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    Spoiler:
    Show
    See my sig
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    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    what a horrible piece of .......music
    Take it up with Boulez

    Speaking of Ferneyhough:


    MMMMMM.
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    Take it up with Boulez

    Speaking of Ferneyhough:


    MMMMMM.
    arrrhggg
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    Take it up with Boulez

    Speaking of Ferneyhough:


    MMMMMM.

    well... i do not like all but some of Fereneyhough's compositions. e.g. flurries.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgDV8mn2hWs
 
 
 
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