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TSR Classical Music Society watch

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    :blow:
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    For anyone who likes Mahler, what do you think of this?



    Mahler wrote of it 'Such is the height to which his genius soars in ... [his] Symphony [in E major], which he wrote as 20-year-old youth and makes him ... the Founder of the New Symphony as I see it. To be sure, what he wanted is not quite what he achieved. … But I know where he aims. Indeed, he is so near to my inmost self that he and I seem to me like two fruits from the same tree which the same soil has produced and the same air nourished. He could have meant infinitely much to me and perhaps the two of us would have well-nigh exhausted the content of new time which was breaking out for music.'

    Unfortunately Rott suffered from mental health problems and extreme sensitivity to criticism, and soon after his symphony was received badly by many of the Conservatory teachers (except Bruckner) and some of the prominent musicians of the day (including Brahms and Hans Richter) his mind snapped and he was committed to a mental hospital. He died soon afterwards at the age of only 25. Very few of his works survive as he tended to destroy most of them after completion, thinking them 'worthless' (probably they weren't, and this was likely due to Rott taking the criticism of others - notably Brahms, who dismissed him as talentless and advised him to give up music - too much to heart).
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    Haven't shown my ugly face in this thread in a few months. Anyone like Szymanowski yet?



    ^That Siegfried Idyll arrangement's pretty sexy.
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    (Original post by danadd9)
    Anyone like Szymanowski yet?
    I've just finished watching that King Roger, and my answer is 'oh god yes'. That was genuinely incredible, especially the Act II sop aria and the dance.

    Might have to re-evaluate his other music now. I think I have a Stabat Mater around somewhere, and that disc of piano music.
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    Should be named variations on a theme of how much is that doggy in the window lol
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    Seeing as Radio 3 will be playing Schubert for nine days straight in March, here's some to prepare you...

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    Hi, once a week I play the piano at the pre-prep assembly, accompanying whatever hymn is scheduled. I'm also meant to 'play them in' i.e. play some light music so there isn't an awkward silence and so the children don't start talking, but all the music in my repetoire is rather 'heavy' for them. Does anyone have any suggestions which wouldnt take too long to learn and would be appropriate for this?
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    Hi everyone, I'm new to TSR as I'm going to study music composition at Cov next year. I think this thread is a great idea. I don't usually get the chance to share some brilliant music with others, and find some in return.

    Has anyone ever heard of Bach's Goldberg Variations? The best version, imo is that played by Glenn Gould in 1981.
    Here is a link to the Aria through to the 7th variation.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w72ZcLFDs6M

    It's fantastic, and Gould, if you've never heard of him, is an absolute genius, if somewhat unstable (aren't they all?). I'd definitely recommend checking some of his background out if you're interested.
    XxX
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    (Original post by YLY)
    Hi, once a week I play the piano at the pre-prep assembly, accompanying whatever hymn is scheduled. I'm also meant to 'play them in' i.e. play some light music so there isn't an awkward silence and so the children don't start talking, but all the music in my repetoire is rather 'heavy' for them. Does anyone have any suggestions which wouldnt take too long to learn and would be appropriate for this?
    You can't go wrong with Rondo Alla Turca -- and the kids love it .
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    (Original post by Jtking3000)
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    I see what you did there.











    :borat: :lol:
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    (Original post by Sovr'gnChancellor£)
    I see what you did there.











    :borat: :lol:

    Baroque obama

    One more for the lulz
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    Hey, great to see there seems to be quite a few pianists here. Could I ask those who have done grade 7 for piano how long it took them to feel ready to take the exam and pass comfortably? And also how important is the grade 7 sight reading?

    Thanks guys!! :h:
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    *drools*
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    Not as good as the Christoff recordings but whatever, it's not bad bad.



    ^Russian confirmed for the best language to sing in.
    Holy cow.
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    Hi - just joined the society group!

    My favourite composers are Chopin, Debussy, Beethoven and Dvorak. I am an adept guitarist and more recently a pianist, unfortunately currently not a particularly skilled one but working to fix it with a lot of practice!

    Mostly listening to late classical/romantic period stuff, working through a lot of Liszt at the moment.

    My favourite pieces are:
    Dvorak - 7th Symphony
    Chopin - Nocturnes op.9, op.15, Nocturne in C# minor op.posth, Preludes xv and xvi op.28, Waltz in A minor op.34, Etudes op.10 and 25 and the 4th Ballade.
    Beethoven - 9th Symphony, Piano Sonatas 8, 14 and 23 (opus 13, 27/2, 57)
    Debussy - Suite Bergamasque particularly the prelude and minuet.
    Liszt - Grandes études de Paganini, S.141

    Overall my favourite piece is probably Chopin's Nocturne in B flat minor op.9 no.1
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    Hi everyone, I just joined the group!

    A bit about me: I'm in the lower sixth form and I play the piano. I'm currently practising for my LTCL diploma in music performance.

    Recently I've been playing Beethoven's Piano Sonata Op. 2 No. 3 for my exam, and Liszt's Liebestraum just as a fun side piece

    My favourite composers are probably Rachmaninoff, Beethoven, Ravel and Liszt. Playing Bach is fun, but I don't listen to much of him.

    Some of my favourite pieces to listen to:
    - Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2

    - Liszt: Sonetto 104 del Petrarca is absolutely gorgeous. I'm hoping I can play it as part of my LTCL recital.

    - Ravel: Pavane pour une Enfante Defunte (piano/orchestral versions). I played the piano version in my last diploma; I prefer the orchestral version though.

    - Chopin: Piano Concertos. The slow movements are so Chopin


    (Original post by score88)
    Hey, great to see there seems to be quite a few pianists here. Could I ask those who have done grade 7 for piano how long it took them to feel ready to take the exam and pass comfortably? And also how important is the grade 7 sight reading?

    Thanks guys!! :h:
    I took my Grade 7 after just under one (academic) year of practising. Sight-reading doesn't matter too much; as long as you give it a try, the examiner has to give you marks. I got a sight-reading score of just on the pass mark for my Grade 7, and I still got a Distinction overall.

    If you're worried about sight-reading, the only thing I can say is... play more. I failed every single sight reading in all of my exams up until Grade 7, but when I started playing easier pieces for fun (e.g. movie soundtracks ), my sight-reading skills HAD to improve because every time I started a new piece, I had to sight-read. I think by the time I took my Grade 8 exam, I only lost two marks on the sight-reading section

    My advice is to practise scales a lot, because it's easy to gain marks on scales... and obviously your pieces are worth the bulk of the marks, so make sure you can play them with confidence on the exam day. I think I had an informal concert arranged by my school a few weeks before my exam so I could play in front of an audience. When it came to my real exam, I'd already done it all before, so I wasn't as nervous so therefore I didn't mess up as badly xD
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    Taking your grade 7 after only one year - you must be exceptionally talented!

    I have only played the piano since late last September. I can play:
    Beethoven's Sonata no.14 in C sharp minor, 1st and 2nd movements
    Chopin's Nocturne in B flat minor op.9 no.1
    Chopin's Waltz in A flat op.34 no.2
    Chopin's Prelude in D flat op.28 no.15
    The second movement of the Pathetique sonata.
    The largo section of the Fantaisie-Impromptu

    I practice about 2-3 hours a day. My Chopin pieces are still far from perfect.
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    I meant that between my Grade 6 and Grade 7 exams was just under one year, not that I only learned piano for one year before I took my Grade 7! That would have to be some insane talent! xD

    I've played piano since the age of five... I think I had been playing for around 7 years when I took my Grade 7 exam.

    Wow, you've only been playing since September and you're already doing the Fantasie Impromptu and Pathetique Sonata?! I only played those after I had completed Grade 8 - at this rate, you'll be the one ready to take Grade 7 after one year! (Though admittedly, the second movement of the Beethoven and the Largo section of the Impromptu are the easiest parts of the pieces xD).

    2-3 hours is a lot! I have to manage to squish my practise times in between my school lessons, so I usually only practise for 1-2 hours a day, and on some days when my lessons run from 9AM to 6PM non-stop I don't practise at all... it's really bad, 'cause if I'm working on an especially difficult part of a piece, and I only just manage to get it under my fingers, after a day of no practise, I always forget how to play it again.

    Today, I found a problem with the Sonnetto del Petrarca that I really wanted to play... my hands are too small to reach any of the left hand chords in the first four-and-a-half bars! Being short is such a pain sometimes.
 
 
 
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