Narik
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#1
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Write out an ionic equation for the reaction of copper oxide:
Is this right?

CuO (s) + H2SO4 (aq) --> CuSO4 (aq) + H2O (l)

CuO (s) + 2H+ (aq) + SO4 2- (aq) --> Cu 2+ (aq) + SO4 2- (aq) + H2O (l)

I think that's right because the CuO ions aren't free to move, so you can't split them and H2O is NOT an ionic bond... Therefore, you get...

CuO (s) + 2H+ (aq) --> Cu 2+ (aq) + H2O (l)

Is this correct and also, how do you know if a substance is a solid or not e.g. copper oxide in this case, because I had to check on the internet...!!

Thanks and will give + rep!
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Rosh_123
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Yes that's correct, but it's better to get rid of the SO4 2- ion though as it's a spectator ion!
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Rosh_123
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Generally when a metal oxide/sulphate/sulphide/halide/carbonate is reacting with an acid it'll be solid. At least it was all the way up to A2-level for me
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addylad
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#4
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(Original post by Narik)
Write out an ionic equation for the reaction of copper oxide:
Is this right?

CuO (s) + H2SO4 (aq) --> CuSO4 (aq) + H2O (l)

CuO (s) + 2H+ (aq) + SO4 2- (aq) --> Cu 2+ (aq) + SO4 2- (aq) + H2O (l)

I think that's right because the CuO ions aren't free to move, so you can't split them and H2O is NOT an ionic bond... Therefore, you get...

CuO (s) + 2H+ (aq) --> Cu 2+ (aq) + H2O (l)

Is this correct and also, how do you know if a substance is a solid or not e.g. copper oxide in this case, because I had to check on the internet...!!

Thanks and will give + rep!
There is an (s) symbol which shows that it is a solid, no? If you were given the equation, that is.
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marya.m
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#5
(Original post by Narik)
Write out an ionic equation for the reaction of copper oxide:

CuO (s) + H2SO4 (aq) --> CuSO4 (aq) + H2O (l)

CuO (s) + 2H+ (aq) --> Cu 2+ (aq) + H2O (l)
sorry i know this is an old thread, but where does the 2+ come from on the Cu2+ on the second part of the equation?
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charco
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#6
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(Original post by marya.m)
sorry i know this is an old thread, but where does the 2+ come from on the Cu2+ on the second part of the equation?
It doesn't come from anywhere - it was always there!

Copper in copper oxide is copper(II) ions and it stays that way...
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Musa23458
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#7
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CuO will always be a solid because it's insoluble
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