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    I've been looking at the universities in Birmingham and nearly all of them want really high UCAS points... like 300 or 280 or so...

    I'm just wondering do they really stick to their guns and only accept people with these or higher points?

    I'm thinking of...

    Education or
    Business courses.
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    Check the clearing lists published in the newspapers such the Guardian and Times, it would be likely you could get in without those high points but don't expect to get in with DDE.

    Also 280 points isn't really that high these days, its just slightly above the UK average for offers.
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    are you hoping to apply for next year? if this year you could maybe try for Clearing?
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    Yups... September 2006.

    I'm really crapping myself already as Birmingham unis are expecting high UCAS points. I haven't even completed my ASs yet and I'm already planning in repeating as I have a gut feeling of getting really crap grades.
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    What about the other universities in the area? I think universities such as Wolverhampton have lower entry standards and it would be a good back up.

    The problem is if you're estimated grades are low I doubt you will even get an offer at Birmingham

    It depends how popular the courses are as well.
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    (Original post by hakkashinhwauk)
    I've been looking at the universities in Birmingham and nearly all of them want really high UCAS points... like 300 or 280 or so...

    I'm just wondering do they really stick to their guns and only accept people with these or higher points?

    I'm thinking of...

    Education or
    Business courses.
    Yes, they will only accept people with 280 or 300 points. If they still have vaccanies they might still take you on with 260 or 270 points. Those courses you chose are good in Birmingham. I rarely see guys wanting to study education though.

    I would choose 3 uni's that want 280+ points and the other 3 uni's at 240 or below as back up.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Education will probably be an easier bet than business in the brum area. The presence of Aston inflates all the other uni's offers (because Aston is a damn good place to study business).

    But when it comes down to it it's better to go for the course you really want to do rather than the easiest to get into.

    If you;re considering teaching then you've got two main routes in - an undergraduate (straight from A levels) QTS teaching degree, or a standard undergraduate degree followed by a 1 year PGCE course.
    I'm just curious, would a PGCE be better than an undergraduate teaching degree? Sometimes people might want to do a normal degree to do a job for the time being, and maybe change their minds to become a teacher and then do a PGCE. Would the standard of PGCE and a 3 year teaching degree be the same?

    I'm not quite sure if he means 'education studies' as the course.
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    (Original post by trev)
    I'm just curious, would a PGCE be better than an undergraduate teaching degree? Sometimes people might want to do a normal degree to do a job for the time being, and maybe change their minds to become a teacher and then do a PGCE. Would the standard of PGCE and a 3 year teaching degree be the same?

    I'm not quite sure if he means 'education studies' as the course.
    I plan to do a standard degree followed by a 1 year PGCE I think it's definitely better for prospective secondary teachers to do that because they need to know their subject in great depth. It's also much more flexible; if I decide later on that I don't want to teach anymore, I'll still have a degree in French and Spanish, which will be useful for a lot of jobs, whereas a teaching degree isn't much good if you don't want to teach! For primary teachers and those who are 100% sure they want to teach, the teaching degree is a quicker route.
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    I have a friend who has just finished a primary teaching degree and I would say that it is definately the way to go. You spend much more time in school and you get a lot more preparation for being a primary teacher than a PGCE. For secondary though a first degree in a related area is important if not essential.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    I plan to do a standard degree followed by a 1 year PGCE I think it's definitely better for prospective secondary teachers to do that because they need to know their subject in great depth. It's also much more flexible; if I decide later on that I don't want to teach anymore, I'll still have a degree in French and Spanish, which will be useful for a lot of jobs, whereas a teaching degree isn't much good if you don't want to teach! For primary teachers and those who are 100% sure they want to teach, the teaching degree is a quicker route.
    Cool. Doing a PGCE would be intense though as you study the 3 year teaching degree into 1 year for PGCE followed by the teaching position at a school. If you decide to do a teaching degree, you could also learn about the subject along with the teaching stuff.

    I am also considering a PGCE too after my degree. It depends how well I do though. Would you be a french or spanish teacher?
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    (Original post by trev)
    Cool. Doing a PGCE would be intense though as you study the 3 year teaching degree into 1 year for PGCE followed by the teaching position at a school. If you decide to do a teaching degree, you could also learn about the subject along with the teaching stuff.

    I am also considering a PGCE too after my degree. It depends how well I do though. Would you be a french or spanish teacher?
    Mainly French because I'll have a GCSE and an A-level in that as well as a degree, whereas I'll be starting Spanish from scratch at university and so I won't have been learning it for long, plus more schools offer French than Spanish, but I'd like to teach both if I could.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Mainly French because I'll have a GCSE and an A-level in that as well as a degree, whereas I'll be starting Spanish from scratch at university and so I won't have been learning it for long, plus more schools offer French than Spanish, but I'd like to teach both if I could.
    Alright then. I'm just worried if during an interview they might ask you to speak in spanish or something like that, and you don't know, as you havn't learnt it before. I hope you can cope with Spanish at uni. Hopefully, it won't be too hard for you to pick it up.
 
 
 
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