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Am I overqualified or just unlucky? watch

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    Been a month I've been applying to I.T jobs and only had one interview and 3 rejections via e-mail. In total (checking my application logs) I've sent out applications to about 30 companies.

    I've graduated 2 years ago with a degree in Comp Sci with 2:2. Am doing a p/t MSc currently( after a Gap year) but I should be leaving that as I've failed 2 out of 4 modules.

    Anyway, in my C.V I've put down I'm still studying MSc as I haven't officially left and I've listed most of my skills. It's quite a fair bit as I have knowledge in alot of computing areas, although I've only used half a side for my skills summary.

    I'm applying to jobs around the £15k mark because I don't have much I.T related experience, only few months contract work building a website.

    Why am I not getting any response? :confused: It's not like I'm applying to jobs which require years of experience or perfect grades. I'm looking to get my foot in the job market and simply working up but even with my qualifications, experience and knowledge I can't even secure the smallest of jobs

    Need help guys! Where am I going wrong? :confused:
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    What jobs type of IT jobs are you applying for? How come you don't have much IT experience when you completed your CS degree? After your degree, you should be very good.

    Probably you get rejections because they found someone better with a 2:1 or above in their degree or something like that.
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    Do some work in the voluntary sector [plus get a *****y job part time to pay the bills] - they're not as pick and it will give you the experience you need to get a job...
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    (Original post by trev)
    What jobs type of IT jobs are you applying for? How come you don't have much IT experience when you completed your CS degree? After your degree, you should be very good.
    Internet and Web development jobs
    I was concentrating more on my degree rather then look for work. After I finished my degree I went on a gap year and when I came back I decided to join up to a MSc. Since then I've been slowly searching for jobs but just the last month I've gone fully into it making 2-3 applications per day excluding weekends.

    Still no luck so far. All I'm asking is for an interview but have only had one so far
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    (Original post by ConfusedGrad)
    Internet and Web development jobs
    I was concentrating more on my degree rather then look for work. After I finished my degree I went on a gap year and when I came back I decided to join up to a MSc. Since then I've been slowly searching for jobs but just the last month I've gone fully into it making 2-3 applications per day excluding weekends.

    Still no luck so far. All I'm asking is for an interview but have only had one so far
    Is your MSc related to internet and web development? You might want to try to do another qualfication besides MSc (e.g. http://corporate.computeach.co.uk/co...-webdesign.php)

    I think you should apply to other types of IT jobs along with the internet and web development jobs. Therefore, if you you get rejected for the internet and web development jobs, you could always do another IT job for the time being (e.g. databases, networks, programming, systems analyst, etc...). In addition, you are not limited to that kind of IT job. With your CS degree, you can do any IT job you like, as that degree covers a lot of braod things about CS.

    How did that one interview go? I'm sure the other jobs you applied so far are still considering you. It takes a long time for the employers to see which candidate is suitable.
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    ConfusedGrad - have you been asking for feedback as to why you're unusucessful in getting each position?

    You can learn a lot about tightening up your CV and future applications that way...
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    You could always try freelance? There's a lot of demand for web design/development. Check out:

    freelancers.net (for some pretty good UK IT jobs)
    designerstalk.com (designer's forum - pretty good employment section)
    sitepoint.com (advice on freelancing)

    There's loads more, but this should keep you entertained for a bit!

    Best Wishes,
    :rolleyes: Michael
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    (Original post by trev)
    Is your MSc related to internet and web development? You might want to try to do another qualfication besides MSc (e.g. http://corporate.computeach.co.uk/co...-webdesign.php)

    I think you should apply to other types of IT jobs along with the internet and web development jobs. Therefore, if you you get rejected for the internet and web development jobs, you could always do another IT job for the time being (e.g. databases, networks, programming, systems analyst, etc...). In addition, you are not limited to that kind of IT job. With your CS degree, you can do any IT job you like, as that degree covers a lot of braod things about CS.

    How did that one interview go? I'm sure the other jobs you applied so far are still considering you. It takes a long time for the employers to see which candidate is suitable.
    I thought you were an A-Level student? Why are you giving advice about post-grad courses you obviously know nothing about? :confused:
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    I thought you were an A-Level student? Why are you giving advice about post-grad courses you obviously know nothing about? :confused:
    Yes, I am an A-level student. I just like to help. I know some stuff about post-grad courses.
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    (Original post by trev)
    Yes, I am an A-level student. I just like to help. I know some stuff about post-grad courses.

    Don't forget medicine! You know stuff about medicine too! :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Sarky)

    Don't forget medicine! You know stuff about medicine too! :rolleyes:
    Yes, indeed. :p: I remember I posted a few posts on there.
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    From what people have told me a once you have your bachelors degree a masters is not much use at all without commerical experience unless you want to go into university research/teaching.

    A masters becomes very useful once you have commerical experience, the most important thing employers seem to be looking for is work experience, attitude, personality etc.

    A degree won't get you the job, you degree will probably just be used as a filter. A 2:2 in Compu Sci is a good degree but the problem seems to be is that too many people also have good degrees.

    You need somthing to make you stand out. By the way I am also looking for jobs in exactly the same area, I've only been looking for two weeks though, I hope the limited commerical experience I do have will help me.

    You might have to consider looking at other areas of work though, just somthing to get your foot in the door, this probably what I might end up doing.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    From what I've seen with CompSci grads on the DoctorJob forum trying to break into the IT sector, mountains of work experience done especially during university seems to be a pre-requisite, because there's so many students with IT-related degrees and few positions now. A 2.1 cut-off point is quite common, and also an MSc seems to be quite useful.
    Sadly a 2:1 does seem to be a cut off, hopefully thats not going to be a problem with me, but my GCSEs and A levels may well be.

    Also its worth noting that Computer Science has the highest amount of unemployment out of all graduate professions :mad:
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    (Original post by trev)
    Yes, I am an A-level student. I just like to help. I know some stuff about post-grad courses.
    Unfortunately, sometimes well meaning advice is counter-productive.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    ConfusedGrad - have you been asking for feedback as to why you're unusucessful in getting each position?

    You can learn a lot about tightening up your CV and future applications that way...
    No I haven't I guess I really should from now on

    (Original post by michael_w)
    You could always try freelance? There's a lot of demand for web design/development. Check out:

    freelancers.net (for some pretty good UK IT jobs)
    designerstalk.com (designer's forum - pretty good employment section)
    sitepoint.com (advice on freelancing)
    l
    Yes I considered that but I really would like a fixed job with fixed income. It's much easier to plan for the future that way Thanks for the site links

    (Original post by Jools)
    From what I've seen with CompSci grads on the DoctorJob forum trying to break into the IT sector, mountains of work experience done especially during university seems to be a pre-requisite, because there's so many students with IT-related degrees and few positions now. A 2.1 cut-off point is quite common, and also an MSc seems to be quite useful.
    yes that's true for the higher paid entry jobs. However, I'm applying to jobs in the 15k region which require 2:2 with little or no experience

    (Original post by AT82)
    A degree won't get you the job, you degree will probably just be used as a filter. A 2:2 in Compu Sci is a good degree but the problem seems to be is that too many people also have good degrees.

    You need somthing to make you stand out. By the way I am also looking for jobs in exactly the same area, I've only been looking for two weeks though, I hope the limited commerical experience I do have will help me.

    You might have to consider looking at other areas of work though, just somthing to get your foot in the door, this probably what I might end up doing.
    Good luck.
    Well I have alot of things which stand out. I've developed a few popular websites which I've ofcourse put down on my C.V but again that is not work experience, merely a personal pursuit. Thing is maybe I know too many things up to a certain level. I am no expert in one particular thing although I do have good programming skills.
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    (Original post by pig)
    You're definitely not over qualified. How are you applying for these jobs? Most publicly advertise jobs are going to have a lot of competition, and if at first glance you don't appear to fit the bill they'll just ditch your application since they'll be wading through hundreds.

    In the IT sector most recruitment is done through agencies, since companies can't usually be bothered to rake through the piles of applications they'd get if they whacked an ad in the paper or directly on jobserve. So the best approach is to be 'registered' with as many agencies as possible (which usually just means they have a copy of your CV).

    You might be having a problem with the gap in your employment, if you haven't had any industrial experience in that time, and you might have to explain a bit about the part time MSc and how that would fit in with a job or else what you're doing about that (quitting it or whatever).

    Lack of experience will certainly be counting against you (much moreso than the 2:2, I wouldn't be bothered about that in particular), especially in the area you say you're applying for, where they usually want to see some kind of portfolio. Big up the contract work you did, it's the beginnings of a portfolio.
    I'm applying to mainly job adverts online. I have registered with a few agences, about 6, although only one has contacted me so far and that to for a discussion. I'll try the site u suggested and put up my cv online

    I guess you're right about the MSc, I should really explain how I intend to fit it around a job but as I mentioned I will be officially leaving the MSc course soon but I need to use it at the moment to improve my chances as "studying for a MSc" adds alot of weight
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    I think this is your problem lack of experience, you could be the best programmer in the world but at the moment an employee dosn't know that you can get up early and get to work in time etc.

    I don't have that much commerical work experience, but it probably only adds up to a month in total so its probably going to be a problem but its better than nothing.

    Have you considered getting a supermarket job for the time being? It will be experience to put down on your CV, ok its not programming but will proove you're reliable and can held down a job, then your degree should back up that you can program etc.

    As for the web development masters I had a look at that but thought it would be a waste of time and money, they won't really teach you anything you don't already know.

    As for programming skills I can kind have this problem, I can program in Java but probably not upto commerical standards, PHP I did get pretty good at and I can learn it in more detail if I have to, the language I feel I probably understood and mastered the most is C#.NET.

    The problem is as well is most employees want experts in one or two languages rather novices in 30 languages.

    Just get some kind of experience to get references and keep looking. The worst thing you can do is stay at home all the time for months while looking for none existant jobs.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    I think this is your problem lack of experience, you could be the best programmer in the world but at the moment an employee dosn't know that you can get up early and get to work in time etc.
    I agree! Though that doesn't mean my past work experience shouldn't be counted. I have worked in one place for just over a year and a summer job and one contract position developing a website albeit a simple website.

    (Original post by AT82)
    Have you considered getting a supermarket job for the time being? It will be experience to put down on your CV, ok its not programming but will proove you're reliable and can held down a job, then your degree should back up that you can program etc.
    No way! Not a supermarket job. I might as well apply to admin/office jobs rather than a supermarkte job Not after spending 3 years in a degree and 1 year in MSc. It's really downing having to go back down to something such as that.
    (Original post by AT82)
    As for the web development masters I had a look at that but thought it would be a waste of time and money, they won't really teach you anything you don't already know.
    I agree! After spending a year in MSc I found out I could learn the same things if I read a few books at home and practiced for a few days on the computer. Waste of money I say!

    (Original post by AT82)
    As for programming skills I can kind have this problem, I can program in Java but probably not upto commerical standards, PHP I did get pretty good at and I can learn it in more detail if I have to, the language I feel I probably understood and mastered the most is C#.NET.
    Same here! I am proficient in Java and thats where I got my programming skills from. I haven't practiced Java in a year or so but all I need is a recap and I can carry on programming at a high level. Infact thanks to my programming skills in java I have been able to pick up other langauges pretty quickly albeit upto an intermediate level.


    (Original post by AT82)
    The problem is as well is most employees want experts in one or two languages rather novices in 30 languages.
    Yes true! Like I said I am not an expert in any one area of computing Maybe the downfall of trying to learn so many things at once
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    So do you have some work experience then, what kind of things are you saying in your covering letter? If you have a years worth of work experience, a degree, a masters, I am not sure what the problem could be.

    Maybe we are all doomed for McDonalds

    Hopefully the market will get better.
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    (Original post by AT82)
    So do you have some work experience then, what kind of things are you saying in your covering letter? If you have a years worth of work experience, a degree, a masters, I am not sure what the problem could be.

    Maybe we are all doomed for McDonalds

    Hopefully the market will get better .
    A year's NON-IT work experience. Basically a small student job which I took when I was 18. Nothing special just an admin/office job.

    In my covering letter I'm keeping it simple and put something like below:

    Please find attached my C.V in support of my application for the position of XXXXX. I am sure, on inspection of my C.V, you will recognise I have the skills and experience required for this position making me a suitable candidate. Moreover, I am eager to put my knowledge to practical use which is my utmost motivation for my application to this position.

    I recognise the level of excellence and commitment required for this position and I believe I can provide a positive contribution to the company and I am certain I will be able to perform to the highest of standards.
    blah blah blah
    Mcdonalds :eek:
 
 
 
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